Modeling Technique Flashcards Preview

Restorative Art > Modeling Technique > Flashcards

Flashcards in Modeling Technique Deck (34):
1

The process of constructing a solid three dimensional from by many additions of a pliable material such as restorative wax.

  • The feature from a mass is impractical

Modeling

2

The linear form of the head or features.

Silhouette

3

Turn the model and the construction until a line is visible.

Use of the solhouette to accurately model surface form.

4

  • First learn the concepts of modeling as taught.
  • As we progress each of us uses our own technique.
  • A thorough knowledge of stuctural relationships and the norm of each feature will help us to recognize any variation and recreate it.
  • Only when we have developed our own technique can we safely "borrow" from others.

Development of technique

5

Any support or framework employed in a restorative treatment.

Armature

6

  • Splints
  • Wire
  • Certain sutures
  • Cotton saturated with:
    • Plaster of paris
    • Liquid sealer
  • Cardboard
  • Pliable metal plates

Types of Armatures

7

Never begin modeling without adequate preparation first.

  • Analyze the situation
  • Anticipate problems
  • Determine a plan of operation

Analyzation Before Modeling

8

When modeling, you determine this and stay within their limits.

  • Involves three dimensions.

Size

9

  1. Length
  2. Width
  3. Projection (most difficult)

Dimensions of Size

10

Correct spatial relationship of features.

Position

11

  • Bone structure
  • Facial proportions (also determines size)

Useful in determining position

12

The external shape

Form

13

  • Knowledge of structural relationships
  • Object analyzation 
  • Manual coordination

Achievement of Form

14

  1. Exact measurements of length and width must be marked on the wax surfaces.
  2. Long shallow lines are marked with a spatula.
  3. These lines can be erased by rubbing a finger over them when the modeling is completed.

Landmarks of Size

15

Whenever 2 or more measurements are made in the same direction, be sure they are made from the same point.

Measurements in one direction

16

  1. The model should be to the side or above the modeling.
  2. Close one eye and model by sighting at arms length.
  3. Profile viewing requires the parallel location of the model.
  4. Refer to the model many times.
  5. View the model and waxwork from the same point.

Position of The Model

17

  • Visualize the feature as a geometric form.
  • Parts of the feature may resemble a form.

Configuration to a pattern.

18

  • Ear - Wedge
  • Glabella- Triangle

Visualize the feature as a geometric form

19

  • Outer rim of the ear - ? (question mark)
  • Closed eye- Almond
  • Line of closure of the lips- Hunting bow

Parts of a feature  may resemble a form

20

Modeling speed will stay the same, the difference is:

  • Fewer mistakes are made as we learn.
  • Correction of errors is time consuming.

Progression

21

The greatest amount of work is done with these.

The hands

22

These are required for inexcesssible areas.

Instruments

23

Use one of these at a time, supporting with the other when necessary.

Hand

24

Try to work at this distance.

Arms length

25

This can result from being heavy handed.

Distortion of the features

26

  • Construct each feature in its rough form.
  • Do the smoothing at one time- when the feature has its form.

Rough Modeling

27

Correctly build the mass, then worry about small details, depressions, concave areas (Example: nares)

Construction of large masses

28

  • By additions
  • By reductions
    • May people prefer to just "start over"
    • You can slowly reduce the model- trim away the wax while maintaining the form.

Surface Corrections

29

To observe the surface as a linear form.

Modeling by silhouette

30

Example: Nose- get the correct profile first, then proceed.

Modeling first by profile.

31

Importance: The form is seen when viewing the deceased.

Modeling the bilateral form second.

32

  • It is nearly impossible when the body is on the table.
  • Inverted position- reveals unnoticed details.

Modeling from Direct View

33

  • Keeps the eyes from becoming fatigued.
  • Modeling will be accurate.
  • Distance viewing is helpful.
  • Move the table to change light direction and create shadows.

Frequency of Changed Viewing

34

  • These are very important
  • Will reduce eye fatigue.
  • When returning to the work area study your subject from a distance.

Rest Periods