Deck 17 Flashcards Preview

My English > Deck 17 > Flashcards

Flashcards in Deck 17 Deck (100):
1

to subsume

include or absorb (something) in something else

- 'Most of these phenomena can be subsumed under two broad categories.'

2

a maître d'
maître d's (pl.)

the person in charge of a restaurant or of the people who bring food to your table in a restaurant
- 'a maître d'hôtel'

3

an incentive

something that encourages a person to do something

- 'Bonus payments provide an incentive to work harder.'

4

obscene

morally wrong, offensive, rude, or shocking, usually because of being too obviously related to sex or showing sex
* obscenity

5

to usher

to show someone where they should go, or to make someone go where you want them to go

- 'She ushered us into her office and offered us coffee.'

6

to shriek

to utter a high-pitched piercing sound or words, especially as an expression of terror, pain, or excitement.

7

to utter

to say something or to make a sound with your voice

- 'She sat through the whole meeting without uttering a word.'

8

to walk out on sb

to suddenly leave your husband, wife, or partner and end your relationship with them

9

sopping

extremely wet

- 'You're sopping wet - go and get changed.'

10

a significant other

A person with whom someone has an established romantic or sexual relationship

11

to suck it up

to cope with something unpleasant without complaining

12

to call it quits

to stop doing something

13

to give/hand sth to sb on a (silver) platter

to allow someone to get something very easily, without having to work for it

14

to grow on someone

to become increasingly liked or enjoyed by someone

- 'The new house slowly began to grow on her.'

15

arm candy [U]

a very attractive person taken by another person to a social event in order to impress other people

16

tad

a little, slightly

- 'The fish was OK, but the chips were a tad greasy.'

17

to hit the sauce/bottle

to drink alcohol, especially rapidly and to excess; booze

18

AWOL

Absent Without Official Leave

19

a faculty

a special ability to do a particular thing

- 'She has a faculty for inspiring confidence in people.'

20

to step up to the plate

to take action when something needs to be done, even though this is difficult

- 'In this crisis we all need to step up to the plate and make a difference.'

21

to walk on eggs/eggshells

If you are walking on eggs/eggshells, you are being very careful not to offend someone or do anything wrong

- 'I feel like I walk on eggshells around you.'

22

bogus

false, not real, or not legal

- 'She produced some bogus documents to support her application.'

23

a bouncer

someone whose job is to stand outside a bar, party, etc. and either stop people who cause trouble from coming in or force them to leave

24

a bystander

a person who is standing near and watching something that is happening but is not taking part in it

25

from scratch

from the beginning

26

to bail on someone

to break a date with someone; stand someone up

27

in good/high spirits

happy, cheerful

28

to get your head out of your ass

to stop being so consumed with yourself, and your own well being /=ogarnąć się

29

to gussy sb/sth up

to make someone or something look more attractive or impressive

- 'She was all gussied up in a designer dress.'

30

balmy

(of weather) pleasantly warm

31

a butterball

a chubby or fat person

32

beguiling

interesting or attractive, but perhaps not to be trusted:

- 'That's a beguiling argument, but I'm not convinced by it.'

33

if sb had their druthers

one's preference in a matter.
- 'If I had my druthers, I would prefer to be a writer.'
- 'If he had his druthers, I suspect he'd still be in bed.'

34

to shoot a text

the simple act of sending a text message

35

an acquisition

the process of getting something

36

a nutjob

a mad or crazy person

37

the flavour of the month

a person or thing that is very popular at a particular time

- 'Environmental issues are no longer the flavour of the month.'

38

to inundate

​to give someone so much work or so many things that they cannot deal with it all

- 'We have been inundated with requests for help.'

39

a hump

a large, round raised area or part

- 'The car hit a hump in the road and swerved.'

40

staggering

very shocking and surprising

41

prevalent

existing very commonly or happening often

- 'These diseases are more prevalent among young children.'

42

to lumber

to move slowly and awkwardly

43

reservations [or U]

a doubt or feeling of not being able to agree with or accept something completely

- 'They shared deep reservations about his choice.'
! 'He accepted my advice without reservation.'

44

syntax

the grammatical arrangement of words in a sentence

45

untiring

If someone has untiring energy, interest, or enthusiasm, their energy, interest, or enthusiasm never becomes weaker

46

to contend

to say that something is true or is a fact

- 'The lawyer contended (that) her client had never been near the scene of the crime.'

47

a subtlety

a small but important detail

48

to be averse to doing sth

strongly disliking or opposed to an activity

49

to make amends for

strongly disliking or opposed to

50

to go without saying

be obvious

51

to approve of sb doing sth

to have a positive opinion of someone or something

52

to be an apple of sb's eye

the person who someone loves most and is very proud of

53

to account for sth

to be the reason for something, or to explain the reason for something

- 'She was asked to account for the missing money.'

54

to amount to

to be the same as something, or to have the same effect as something

- 'What you're saying amounts to blackmail.'

55

to make a beeline for something

to move quickly and directly toward something

56

to bump into sb

to meet someone you know when you have not planned to meet them

57

to barter

to exchange goods for other things rather than for money

- 'He bartered his stamp collection for her comics.'

58

abashed

embarrassed

59

a foregone conclusion

a result that is obvious to everyone even before it happens

- 'It's a forgone conclusion that Mark will get the job.'

60

to make allowances

to accept behaviour that you would not normally accept because you know why someone has behaved that way

- 'We have to make allowances for his lack of experience.'

61

in abeyance

halted temporarily; in suspension

62

out and about

engaging in normal activity after an illness

- 'She should be out and about in a few days' time.'

63

to be of/have no fixed abode

to not have a permanent home

64

in the abstract

in a general way

65

of one's own accord

If you do something of your own accord, you do it without being asked to do it

66

to agree to differ/disagree

If two people agree to differ, they accept that they have different opinions about something and stop trying to persuade each other that they are right.

67

in arrears

owing money that should have been paid already

- 'They are in arrears on/with their mortgage payments.'

68

to cast aspersions on sb/sth

to criticize or make damaging remarks or judgments about someone or something

- 'His opponents cast aspersions on his patriotism.'

69

to throw sb off balance

to confuse, surprise or upset someone for a short time by saying or doing something that they are not expecting

70

on the ball

alert, active and aware of things

71

to be beside oneself with

If you are beside yourself with a particular feeling or emotion, it is so strong that it makes you almost out of control

72

to bide one's time

to wait calmly for a good opportunity to do something

- 'She was biding her time until she could get her revenge.'

73

to be in the black

not owing anybody any money

74

to blaze a trail

to do something that has never been done before:

- 'Claude Debussy blazed a trail in music.'

75

on the blink

When a machine is on the blink, it is not working correctly.

76

to go by the board

to be forgotten or not used

- 'Does this mean our holiday plans will have to go by the board?'

77

cut to the bone

reduced to the minimum

78

to pick someone’s brain

to ask someone's advice about a subject the person knows a lot about

- 'Can I pick your brain about how you got rid of those weeds?'

79

a sitter

someone who is having their portrait painted

80

to chuckle

to laugh quietly

- 'She was chuckling to herself as she read the book.'

81

to guffaw

to laugh loudly, especially at something stupid that someone has said or done

82

to sneer

to talk about or look at someone or something in an unkind way that shows you do not respect or approve of them

- 'You may sneer, but a lot of people like this kind of music.'

83

to snigger

to laugh at someone or something in a silly and often unkind way

- 'What are you two sniggering at/about?'

84

to beam

to smile with obvious pleasure

- She beamed with delight at his remarks.

85

to titter

to laugh nervously, often at something that you feel you should not be laughing at

86

to grin

to smile a wide smile

87

to grin and bear it

to accept something bad without complaining

88

adroitly

very skilfully and quickly

89

to sway

to persuade someone to believe or do one thing rather than another

- 'Her speech failed to sway her colleagues into supporting the plan.'

90

affluent

having a lot of money or owning a lot of things:
affluent nations

91

well off

rich

92

revenue [U]

the income that a government or company receives regularly

93

to appreciate

to increase in value

- 'The value of our house has appreciated by 50 percent in the last two years.'

94

to work like a charm

to be very effective, possibly in a surprising way

95

to be in sb's good/bad books

If you are in someone's good/bad books, they are pleased/not pleased with you

96

a raw deal

bad or unfair treatment

97

to lay the blame for sth on sb

to place the blame for something on someone

98

new blood [U]

people with a lot of energy or fresh ideas who are brought into an organization in order to improve it

99

unintelligible

impossible to understand

100

a cliffhanger

a story or a situation that is exciting because its ending or result is uncertain until it happens