Deck 18 Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Deck 18 Deck (100):
1

to run one's mouth

to talk a lot

- 'He was mean and angry and he just kept running his mouth.'

2

demented

unable to think or act clearly because you are extremely worried, angry, or excited by something

3

to take down a notch/peg

to instruct an individual to regulate their level of enthusiasm or to humble someone

- 'Robert needs to take it down a notch with the flirting; he already has a girlfriend.'

4

abject

the state of being extremely unhappy, poor, unsuccessful, etc.

- 'They live in abject poverty.'

5

to snoop on

to look around a place secretly, in order to discover things or find out information about someone or something

- 'People were sent out to snoop on rival businesses.'

6

a prowler

someone who moves around quietly in a place, trying not to be seen, often before committing a crime

7

a lout

a young man who behaves in a very rude, offensive, and sometimes violent way

8

savvy [U]

practical knowledge and ability

- 'She hasn't got much savvy.'

9

incarceration

the state of being confined in prison; imprisonment

10

to dull

to make something less severe

- 'Homeless children sniff glue to dull their hunger pains.- '

11

an atrocity [C usually pl.]

an extremely cruel, violent, or shocking act

- 'They are on trial for committing atrocities against the civilian population.'

12

to butt out of

to stop interfering

- 'Politicians should butt out of these cases.'

13

to miss a beat

to pause or show uncertainty, usually when this is surprising

- '"That's what I thought," replied Olivia, without missing a beat.'

14

penniless

having no money

15

exorbitant

Exorbitant prices, demands, etc. are much too large

16

scum [U/C pl.: scum]

a very bad or immoral person or group of people

- 'His boss treats him like scum (= very badly).'

17

vicarious

experienced as a result of watching, listening to, or reading about the activities of other people, rather than by doing the activities yourself

18

to hightail it

to leave or go somewhere in a great hurry

- 'As soon as I heard he was coming I hightailed it out of there.'

19

artsy-fartsy

trying too hard to make other people admire your artistic knowledge or ability

- 'Phil and his arty-farty friends.'

20

to make eyes at sb

to flirt with someone

21

a dissertation

a very long piece of writing done as part of a course of study

22

a hotcake

​a pancake

23

wee hours

the early hours of the morning, between twelve o'clock at night and the time when the sun rises

24

to electrocute

to injure or kill (someone) by electric shock

25

pretentious

trying to appear or sound more important or clever than you are, especially in matters of art and literature

26

a dint

a small hollow mark in the surface of something, caused by pressure or by being hit

27

poncy

expensive or high quality

28

shabby

looking old and in bad condition because of being used for a long time or not being cared for

29

a tenant

a person who pays rent for the use of land or a building

30

to pull the plug on sth

to do something that prevents an activity from continuing, especially by no longer giving money to support it

- 'If the viewing figures drop much more, the TV network will probably pull the plug on the whole series.'

31

fraud [C/U]

the crime of getting money by deceiving people

- 'credit card fraud'

32

to alight

to get out of a vehicle, especially a train or bus

- 'Mr Pickwick alighted at the gate grom his car.'

33

to convict of

to decide officially in a law court that someone is guilty of a crime

- 'He has twice been convicted of robbery/arson.'

34

not for the life of me

used for emphasizing that you cannot remember or understand something at all

35

not have the faintest idea

used for emphasizing that you do not know or understand something

36

to glow up

to go from the bottom to the top to the point of disbelief.; through an incredible transformation

37

to daydream

If you daydream, you think about pleasant things for a period of time, usually about things that you would like to happen.

38

prepubescent

relating to the period before children start to develop adult sexual characteristics

- 'prepubescent boys'

39

long story short

Taking a long story and summarising its main points, skipping over unnecessary details.

40

residual

remaining after the greater part or quantity has gone

41

renowned

known or talked about by many people; famous

42

comedogenic

tending to cause blackheads by blocking the pores of the skin

43

hypoallergenic

(especially of cosmetics and textiles) relatively unlikely to cause an allergic reaction

44

innocuous

completely harmless (= causing no harm)

45

proliferation

a rapid increase in the number or amount of something

- 'We attempted to measure cell proliferation.'

46

lacklustre

without energy and effort

- 'Britain's number-one tennis player gave a disappointingly lacklustre performance.'

47

cutaneous

relating to the skin

48

stigma [S/U]

a strong feeling of disapproval that most people in a society have about something, especially when this is unfair

- 'There is no longer any stigma to being divorced.'

49

sturdy

physically strong and solid or thick, and therefore unlikely to break or be hurt

- 'a sturdy table'

50

to wane

The moon wanes when it gradually appears less and less round, after the full moon.

51

a slinky

a toy in the form of a loose metal or plastic spring that can be made to "walk" down stairs

52

to flatline

to die

53

debilitating

(of a disease or condition) making someone very weak and infirm

54

merit [U]

the quality of being good and deserving praise

- 'an entertaining film with little artistic merit'

55

a watershed

an event or period marking a turning point in a situation

- 'These works were a watershed in the history of music.'

56

a trailblazer

a person who is the first to do something; an innovator

57

to acquit

o decide officially in a law court that someone is not guilty of a particular crime

- 'She was acquitted of all the charges against her.'

58

to lend oneself or itself to

to be adaptable to something

- 'This room doesn't lend itself to bright colours.'
- 'John doesn't lend himself to casual conversation. '

59

to reverberate

If a loud, deep sound reverberates, it continues to be heard around an area, so that the area seems to shake

- 'The narrow street reverberated with/to the sound of the workmen's drills.'

60

pervasive

present or noticeable in every part of a thing or place

- 'The influence of Freud is pervasive in her books.'

61

to veer

to change direction

- 'All of a sudden, the car veered off the road.'

62

imperious

unpleasantly proud and expecting to be obeyed

63

conceit

the state of being too proud of yourself and your actions

64

a helping

an amount of food given to one person at one time

- 'She eagerly took a second helping of ice cream.'

65

dilapidated

old and in poor condition

66

to delve into sth

to examine something carefully in order to discover more information about someone or something

67

grandeur

the quality of being very large and special or beautiful

- 'the grandeur of Wagner's music'

68

to mint

to produce something new, especially to invent a new phrase or word

- 'newly minted college graduates'

69

a love child

a child whose parents are not married to each other

70

to dissuade

to persuade someone not to do something

- 'I tried to dissuade her from leaving.'

71

preconceived

(of an idea or an opinion) formed too early, especially without enough thought or knowledge

72

to gentrify

to change a place from being a poor area to a richer one

- 'The area where I grew up has been all modernised and gentrified, and has lost all its old character.'

73

to discombobulate

to confuse someone or make someone feel uncomfortable

74

slick

skilful and effective but not sincere or honest

75

to be (as) thick as thieves

to be very close friends and share secrets

76

to keep at arm's length

to avoid becoming connected with someone or something

77

to suffuse

to spread through or over something completely

- 'His voice was low and suffused with passion.'

78

gritty

showing all the unpleasant but true details of a situation

- 'a gritty portrayal of inner-city poverty'

79

to keep it 100 (a hundred)

to keep yourself real and true, to be honest and stick to the way you are, no matter what anyone else thinks

80

a circumference [S/U]

the line surrounding a circular space, or the length of this line

- 'the circumference of a circle'

81

to blabber on

​to talk a lot, especially in a way people find annoying or embarrassing

- 'He's always blabbering on about computers.'

82

to compromise

to risk having a harmful effect on something

- 'We would never compromise the safety of our passengers.'

83

a farce

used to describe something that is supposed to be serious but has turned ridiculous

84

patently

clearly; without a doubt

- 'She was patently lying.'

85

to hit it off (with someone)

to be friendly with each other immediately

- 'We had similar ideas about the show, and the two of us hit it off right away.'

86

to talk the talk

to talk or act in a confident way so that you seem to be very good at what you do

87

I'll have you know

used to emphasise something in a somewhat annoyed or angry way /=dla twojej świadomości

- 'I’ll have you know you’re insulting the woman I love.'

88

heavy-hearted

feeling depressed or melancholy

89

to tread water

to be active but without making progress or falling further behind /=stać w miejscu, pływać w miejscu

90

CPR

cardiopulmonary resuscitation (PL: RKO)

91

stubble [U]

the short hair that grows on a man's face if he has not shaved for a few days
*stubbly (adj.)

92

liability [U]

the fact that someone is legally responsible for something

- 'He denies any liability for the damage caused.'

93

the gist [S]

the most important pieces of information about something, or general information without details

- 'I think I got the gist of what she was saying.'

94

bubblegum

attractive to children or teenagers because of not being serious or not needing much mental effort

- 'a bubblegum pop group'

95

entitled

feeling that you have the right to do or have what you want without having to work for it or deserve it, just because of who you are

96

the holy grail (HG)

something that is extremely difficult to find or get yet being of the best quality

97

to swear by (something)

to believe that something is effective

- 'My father swears by whisky as a cure for a cold.'

98

opaque

1. not able to be seen through; not transparent
2. (especially of language) hard or impossible to understand.

99

to not bring yourself to do something

to not be able to force yourself to do something that you think is unpleasant

- 'I just couldn't bring myself to talk to him about it.'

100

sheer

used to emphasise how very great, important, or powerful a quality or feeling is

- 'It was sheer coincidence that we met.'