Deck 21 Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Deck 21 Deck (100):
1

to take a rain check (on sth)

​used to tell someone that you cannot accept an invitation now, but would like to do so at a later time

- 'Mind if I take a rain check on that drink? I have to work late tonight.'

2

larceny

theft of personal property

3

homely

(of a person) unattractive in appearance

4

at large

(especially of a criminal or dangerous animal) at liberty; escaped or not yet captured

5

a bachelor party

a party for a man who is going to get married, to which only his male friends are invited

6

defamation

the act of harming someone's reputation by saying or writing bad things about them

7

a wuss

a coward (= person who is not brave)

8

unseemly

(of behaviour or actions) not proper or appropriate

9

cerulean

deep blue in colour like a clear sky

10

to commend

to formally and officially praise someone

11

a bearing on sth

relation; relevance

- 'The case has no direct bearing on the issues being considered.'

12

a bloke

a man

13

to nick

to steal

14

a bellend

a stupid or annoying man

15

to say something in a roundabout way

to say something indirectly

16

compliance

the act of obeying an order, rule, or request

17

abhorrent

inspiring disgust by being morally very bad

18

brittle

delicate and easily broken

19

embittered

very angry about unfair things that have happened to you

20

donezo

an exclamation to be used when finished wtih something

- 'I'm donezo!'

21

to bump uglies

to have sex

22

to play coy

to avoid giving a direct or complete answer

- 'When asked about his next book, he played coy.'

23

haphazard

not having an obvious order or plan

- 'He tackled the problem in a typically haphazard manner.'

24

to consort

​to spend a lot of time in the company of a particular group of people, especially people whose character is not approved of

- 'They claimed he had been consorting with drug dealers.'

25

a waiver

an agreement that you do not have to pay or obey something

26

ennui [U]

a feeling of being bored and mentally tired caused by having nothing interesting or exciting to do

27

to bemoan

to complain or express sadness about something

28

intrepid

extremely brave and showing no fear of dangerous situations

29

perchance

by chance; possibly; perhaps

- 'Do you know her, perchance?'

30

a bee's knees

a highly admired person or thing

31

frayed

with the threads at the edge coming loose

32

to exonerate

to show or state that someone or something is not guilty of something

- 'The report exonerated the crew from all responsibility for the collision.'

33

a stumper

a puzzling question

34

phat

excellent

35

to hit the mark

be successful in an attempt or accurate in a guess

36

in the sticks

in the middle of nowhere

37

to have/keep several balls in the air

to try to do several different things at the same time

38

whimsical

playfully quaint or fanciful, especially in an unusual and amusing way

39

to stonewall

to stop a discussion from developing by refusing to answer questions or by talking in such a way that you prevent other people from giving their opinions

40

reprehensible

If someone's behaviour is reprehensible, it is extremely bad or unacceptable

41

thine

archaic form of yours

42

shrill

(of a voice or sound) high-pitched and piercing

43

hark

used to tell someone to listen

- 'Hark, I hear a distant trumpet!'

44

same old same old

used to say that a situation or someone's behaviour remains the same, especially when it is boring or annoying

- 'Most people just keep on doing the same old same old every day.'

45

to strut

to walk in a proud way trying to look important

46

to desist

to stop doing something, especially something that someone else does not want you to do

- 'The soldiers have been ordered to desist from firing their guns.'

47

to clout

to hit someone or something hard

48

to stymie

prevent or hinder the progress of

- 'The changes must not be allowed to stymie new medical treatments.'

49

to skedaddle

to depart quickly or hurriedly; run away

50

serene

calm, peaceful and untroubled; tranquil

51

frenetic

fast and energetic in a rather wild and uncontrolled way

52

an intricacy - intricacies

details, especially of an involved or perplexing subject

53

an cobweb

a spider's web, especially when old and dusty

54

semblance [U]

a situation or condition that is similar to what is wanted or expected, but is not exactly as hoped for

- 'The city has now returned to some semblance of normality after last night's celebrations.'

55

a celebutante /sɪˈlɛbjuːtɑːnt/

a celebrity who is well known in fashionable society

56

draught /drɑːft/

denoting beer or cider served from a barrel or tank rather than from a bottle or can

- 'draught ale'

57

a next of kin

the person or group of people you are most closely related to

58

henpecked


A henpecked man is controlled by and a little frightened of a woman, especially his wife.

59

to browbeat

​to try to force someone to do something by threatening them or persuading them forcefully and unfairly

- 'Don't be browbeaten into working more hours than you want.'

60

a linchpin

a person or thing vital to an enterprise or organisation

61

crinkly

full of creases or wrinkles; wrinkled

62

to limp

to walk slowly and with difficulty because of having an injured or painful leg or foot

63

brazen

bold and without shame

64

a misnomer

a name that does not suit what it refers to, or the use of such a name

- 'It was the scruffiest place I've ever stayed in, so "Grand Hotel" was a complete misnomer.'

65

forceps (pl.)

​a metal instrument with two handles used in medical operations for picking up, pulling, and holding things

66

poised

ready to do a particular thing at any moment

- 'The company is poised to launch its new advertising campaign.'

67

to go south

to make an escape; to disappear

- 'The mugger went South just after the crime.'

68

to garrotte

to kill someone by putting a metal wire or cord around their neck and pulling it

69

to rout

to defeat an opponent completely

70

to work around the clock

to work all day and all night long

71

temerity [U]

a willingness to do or say something that shocks or upsets other people

- 'She had the temerity to call me a liar.'

72

on the lam

moving from place to place to avoid being found or caught

- 'Richard has been on the lam for a week now.'

73

a dearth

an amount or supply that is not large enough

- 'a dearth of new homes in the region'

74

a tadpole

a small, black creature with a large head and long tail that lives in water and develops into a frog or toad

75

to bifurcate

(of roads, rivers, branches, etc.) to divide into two parts

76

toodles!

a shortened anglicised version of the French phrase à tout à l'heure which means goodbye.

77

to tinker with sth

to make small changes to something, especially in an attempt to repair or improve it

- 'I wish the government would stop tinkering with the health service.'

78

to glean

to collect information in small amounts and often with difficulty

- 'From what I was able to glean, the news isn't good.'

79

a lackey

a servant or someone who behaves like one by obeying someone else's orders or by doing unpleasant work for them

80

mottled

covered with areas of different colours that do not form a regular pattern

- 'mottled skin'

81

a courtship

a period during which a couple develop a romantic relationship before getting married

82

to court

to be involved with (someone) romantically, with the intention of marrying

- 'He was courting a girl from the neighbouring farm.'

83

dejection [U]

a sad and depressed state; low spirits

84

inclined

likely or wanting to do something

- 'No one seemed inclined to help.'

85

weepy

feeling likely to cry

86

a frontier

a border between two countries

87

to dissipate

to (cause to) gradually disappear or waste

- 'The heat gradually dissipates into the atmosphere.'
- 'His anger dissipated as the situation became clear.'

88

to hover

to remain in one place in the air

89

to clamp down on sth

to take strong action to stop or limit a harmful or unwanted activity

- 'The government is clamping down on teenage drinking.'

90

the brunt of sth

​the main force of something unpleasant

- 'Small companies are feeling the full brunt of the recession.'

91

an enclosure

an area surrounded by fences or walls

- 'an enclosure for the horses'

92

stirring

causing excitement or strong emotion; rousing

93

to scrutinise

to examine something very carefully in order to discover information

94

to cop out

to avoid doing something that one ought to do

- 'He would not cop out of the difficult tax decisions.'

95

upkeep [U]

the cost or process of keeping something, such as a building, in good condition

- 'The upkeep of larger old properties is very expensive.'

96

uproar [S/U]

a situation in which a lot of people complain about something angrily or make a lot of noise

- 'The book caused an uproar in France.'

97

the subject matter

the things that are being talked or written about, or used as the subject of a piece of art, etc.

- 'The subject matter of the documentary was not really suitable for children.'

98

to excavate

to remove earth that is covering very old objects buried in the ground in order to discover things about the past

99

to undulate

to move with a smooth wave-like motion

- 'Her body undulated to the thumping rhythm of the music.'

100

perverse

strange and not what most people would expect or enjoy

- 'She took a perverse pleasure in hearing that her sister was getting divorced.'