Deck 19 Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Deck 19 Deck (100):
1

a feat

an act or achievement that shows great skill or strength

- 'The Eiffel Tower is a remarkable feat of engineering.'

2

a vantage point

the way you think about a subject when you are in a particular situation

- 'From my vantage point...'

3

to deride

to talk about someone or something as if they are ridiculous and do not deserve any respect

- 'Her novel, once derided by critics, is now a classic.'

4

a grudge

a strong feeling of anger and dislike for a person who you feel has treated you badly, especially one that lasts for a long time

- 'I don't bear any grudge against you.'

5

to be onto someone

to have found out that a particular person was involved in a crime

- 'He knew the police were onto him.'

6

a sacrilege [S/U]

(an act of) treating something holy or important without respect

- 'Muslims consider it sacrilege to wear shoes inside a mosque.

7

blasphemy [U]

something that you say or do that shows you do not respect God or a religion

8

an extravaganza

a large, exciting, and expensive event or entertainment

- 'a musical extravaganza'

9

temperamental

A temperamental person is someone whose mood often changes very suddenly

- 'Be careful how you approach her - she's very temperamental.'

10

staple

basic or main; standard or regular

- 'Prices of staple foods such as wheat and vegetables have also been increasing.'

11

to insulate

to protect someone or something from harmful experiences or influences

- 'Children should be insulated from the horrors of war.'

12

unparalleled

having no equal; better or greater than any other

13

muted

A muted colour is not bright

14

a cavern

a large cave

15

to tamper with sth

to touch or make changes to something that you should not, usually without enough knowledge of how it works or when you are trying to damage it

- 'I could see immediately that the lock had been tampered with.'

16

to disburse

​to pay out money, usually from an amount that has been collected for a particular purpose:

17

a gourmet

a person who knows a lot about food and cooking, and who enjoys eating high-quality food

18

shorthand [U]

a method of rapid writing by means of abbreviations and symbols, used especially for taking dictation

- 'Their conversations were taken down in shorthand by a secretary.'

19

mutton [U]

the meat from a goat or sheep ate as food

20

a larder

a cupboard or small room used, especially in the past, for storing food in someone's home

21

fussy, overfussy

1. not easily satisfied, or having very high standards about particular things
2. having too much decoration and too many small details, in a way that is not stylish

22

a currant

a small, black dried grape without seeds

23

unrest [U]

disagreements or fighting between different groups of people

24

to squabble

to argue over something that is not important

25

to inculcate

​to fix beliefs or ideas in someone's mind, especially by repeating them often

- 'Our coach has worked hard to inculcate a team spirit in/into the players.'

26

to snort

to suddenly express strong feelings of anger, disapproval, or disagreement, either by speaking or in a sound that you make

27

an antecedent

someone or something existing or happening before, especially as the cause or origin of something existing or happening later

28

stoked

excited or euphoric

29

word for word

using exactly the same words

- 'She listened to everything I said and repeated it word for word to her mum.'

30

cropping

The art of strategically placing one's body in a photograph as to make that individual look different than they do in real life

31

a mock-up

a full-size model of something large that has not yet been built, showing how it will look or operate

32

to absolve

(especially in religion or law) to free someone from guilt, blame, or responsibility for something

- 'The priest absolved him (of all his sins).'

33

a pew

a long wooden seat with a high back, on which a row of people sit in a church

34

to wring (out)

to twist a cloth or piece of clothing with your hands to remove water from it

- 'She wrung out the shirt and hung it out to dry.'

35

concrete

clear and certain, or real and existing in a form that can be seen or felt

- 'They think she killed her husband, but they have no concrete evidence.'

36

to abduct

to force someone to go somewhere with you, often using threats or violence
* the UFO abduction

37

triage [U]

the process of quickly examining patients who are taken to a hospital in order to decide which ones are the most seriously ill and must be treated first

38

to lionise

to make someone famous, or to treat someone as if they were famous

39

a score

the music written for a film, play

- 'Rodgers wrote the score for/of/to "Oklahoma!".'

40

spot on

completely accurate; exactly right

41

pointedly

in a very obvious way, usually to express criticism or disapproval

- 'He pointedly ignored her after the show.'

42

altogether

completely; totally

- 'I stopped seeing her altogether.'

43

to string someone along

to falsely encourage someone to believe there is hope of a good result

44

to tally

to match or agree with something else

- 'The numbers on your spreadsheet don't tally with ours.'

45

to rake

to use a rake to make earth level or to collect leaves

- 'In the autumn I rake (up) the dead leaves.'

46

to rock

to (cause someone or something to) move backwards and forwards or from side to side in a regular way

- 'He picked up the baby and gently rocked her to sleep.'
- 'a rocking chair'

47

a jig

an energetic traditional dance of Great Britain and Ireland, or the music that is played for such a dance

48

an utensil

a tool, container, or other article, especially for household use

49

coquettish

behaving in such a way as to suggest a playful sexual attraction; flirtatious

50

to finesse

to deal with a situation or a person in a skilful and often slightly dishonest way

51

to play down sth

to make something seem less important or less bad than it really is
- 'She finessed the interview by playing down her lack of experience.'

52

a crib

Someone's crib is their home or the place where they are living at present.

53

to weld

to combine and form a harmonious or effective whole

54

to clock off/out

to leave work, especially by recording the time you leave on a special machine

55

a comfort food [C/U]

the type of food that people eat when they are sad or worried, often sweet food or food that people ate as children

56

inconclusive

not leading to a firm conclusion or result; not ending doubt or dispute

57

to condone

to accept behaviour that is considered morally wrong or offensive

58

to saunter

​to walk in a slow and relaxed way, often in no particular direction

- 'He sauntered by, looking very pleased with himself.'

59

let alone

used to indicate that something is far less likely or suitable than something else already mentioned

- 'He was incapable of leading a bowling team, let alone a country.'

60

merely because

only because

61

to iterate

to constantly repeat one action

62

to outfox

to defeat (someone) by being more clever or cunning than them

63

a slack/slack

adj. not tight; loose
n. the fact that something is too loose

64

to dispatch

to send something, especially goods or a message, somewhere for a particular purpose

65

unadulterated

not spoiled or made weaker by the addition of other substances; pure

66

a hermit

a person living in solitude as a religious discipline

67

to rat out

to expose or reveal incriminating or embarrassing information about someone

68

headspace

a person's state of mind or mindset

69

a hobo

a person who has no place to live and no money and who travels to many different places

70

to crash

to sleep at someone else's house for the night, especially when you have not planned it
* also: to go to a party or other event without an invitation

71

to coincide

to happen at or near the same time

- 'I timed my holiday to coincide with the children's.'
- ''Our views coincide on a range of subjects.'

72

debaucherous

displaying bad sexual behaviour, drinking too much alcohol, taking drugs, etc

73

a recluse

a person who lives alone and avoids going outside or talking to other people

74

to deteriorate

to become worse

- 'She was taken to hospital last week when her condition suddenly deteriorated.'

75

to actualise

to make a reality of

- 'He had actualized his dream and achieved the world record.'

76

to julienne

to cut food into short, thin strips

77

inconsiderate

not thinking or worrying about other people or their feelings

78

to speak ill of someone

to say something bad about someone

79

to belittle

to make a person or an action seem as if he, she or it is not important

- 'Stop belittling yourself - your work is highly valued.'

80

repellent

causing disgust or distaste

81

gallant

(of a man) polite and kind towards women, especially when in public

82

canning

a method of preserving food in which the food contents are processed and sealed in an airtight container

83

to shuck

to remove the shell or natural covering from something that is eaten

84

hectic

full of activity, or very busy and fast

- 'a hectic schedule'

85

a shiner

a bruise near the eye; a black eye

86

scrawny

unpleasantly thin, often with bones showing

87

consolation [U]

something that makes someone who is sad or disappointed feel better

- 'I didn't know what to say - I just offered a few words of consolation.'

88

a bimbo

an attractive but unintelligent or frivolous young woman

89

catatonic

If someone is catatonic, they are stiff and not moving or reacting, as if dead.

90

a saphead

a weak-minded stupid person

91

a soirée

an evening party or gathering, typically in a private house, for conversation or music

92

to skimp on sth

to not spend enough time or money on something

- 'Many old people skimp on food and heating in order to meet their bills.'

93

to splinter

to break into small, sharp pieces

94

to appease

to bring to a state of peace, quiet, ease, calm, or contentment

- 'to appease an angry king'

95

a feather in one's cap

an achievement to be proud of:

- 'It's a real feather in your cap to have such a beautiful girlfriend.'

96

to take sb aback

to surprise or shock someone so much that they do not know how to behave for a short time:

97

to portend

to be a sign that something bad is likely to happen in the future

- 'The eclipses portend some major events.'

98

a potshot

a shot that is fired carelessly or with little preparation

- 'He was taking potshots at neighbourhood cats.'

99

entre nous

between us; privately

100

to pamper

to give someone special treatment, making that person as comfortable as possible and giving them whatever they want

- 'She pampers her dog with the finest steak and salmon.'