Deck 15 Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Deck 15 Deck (100):
1

a seasoning

a substance, especially salt or pepper, that is added to food to improve its flavour

2

in jeopardy

in the risk of loss or injury; in peril or danger

- 'The whole peace process is in jeopardy.'

3

hangry

becoming angry because you are feeling hungry

4

conducive

providing the right conditions for something good to happen or exist

- 'Such a noisy environment was not conducive to a good night's sleep.'

5

bluntly

If you speak bluntly, you speak without trying to be polite or considering other people's feelings

- 'To put it bluntly, I can't afford it.'

6

to revel in sth

to get great pleasure from a situation or an activity

7

undoing [S.]

the cause of someone's failure, or of someone's loss of power or money

8

to unravel

to investigate and solve or explain (something complicated or puzzling)

- 'They were attempting to unravel the cause of death.'

9

conducive

providing the right conditions for something good to happen or exist

- 'Such a noisy environment was not conducive to a good night's sleep.'

10

bluntly

If you speak bluntly, you speak without trying to be polite or considering other people's feelings

- 'To put it bluntly, I can't afford it.'

11

to divvy sth up

​to share out (often between a number of people)

- 'They haven't yet decided how to divvy up the proceeds from the sale.'

12

compulsively

​too much and in a way that shows you are unable to stop

- 'She exercises/cleans/works compulsively.'

13

an abomination

świństwo
= something that you dislike and disapprove of

14

a horndog

a man with strong sexual desires

15

to fornicate

to have sex with someone who you are not married to

16

to fall short (of)

to fail to reach its target

- 'August car sales fell short of the industry's expectations.'

17

a bottle blonde

a woman with artificially lightened blonde hair

18

derogatory

showing strong disapproval and not showing respects

- 'He made some derogatory comment/remark about her appearance.'

19

to enthral

to keep someone completely interested
* enthralling

- 'She had been so enthralled by the adventure that she had hardly noticed the cold.'

20

to reminisce

to talk or write about past experiences that you remember with pleasure

- 'My grandfather used to reminisce about his years in the navy.'

21

an aficionado

someone who is very interested in and enthusiastic about a particular subject

- 'an aficionado of French cinema'

22

to unsheathe

to draw or pull out (a knife, sword, or similar weapon) from its sheath or covering

23

an itinerary

a detailed plan or route of a journey

24

to be on a schedule

to be short on time

25

a libertine

a person, usually a man, who lives in a way that is not moral, having sexual relationships with many people

26

to look into something

to investigate something

- 'I'll have to look into that matter.'

27

thrifty

(adj.) using money and other resources carefully and not wastefully

28

a damsel

a young woman who is not married

29

to dawn on sb

If a fact dawns on you, you understand it after a period of not understanding it

- 'I was about to pay for the shopping when it suddenly dawned on me that I'd left my wallet at home.'

30

off one's rocker

mad

- 'He looked so strange she thought he was off his rocker.'

31

(a)round the bend

crazy, beyond sanity
- 'I think I’m going around the bend.'

32

fisticuffs

​fighting in which people hit each other with their fists

33

preexisting

existing at an earlier time

- 'a preexisting medical condition'

34

to flabbergast

to shock someone, usually by telling that person something they were not expecting

- 'He was flabbergasted when we told him how cheap it was.'

35

contractual

relating to or contained within a contract (= legal agreement)

- 'contractual conditions'

36

to put your best foot forward

​to try as hard as you can

37

aw shucks

used to show that you feel embarrassed or shy

38

contrary to popular belief/opinion

something that you say before you make a statement that is the opposite of what most people believe

- 'Contrary to popular belief, bottled water is not always better than tap water.'

39

all the while

for all of a period of time

- 'There I was thinking you were hard at work and you were upstairs in bed all the while!'

40

to amass

to get a large amount of something, especially money or information, by collecting it over a long period

'She has amassed a huge fortune from her novels.'

41

an imponderable

zagadka
= something that cannot be guessed or calculated because it is completely unknown

42

savoury

Savoury food is salty or spicy and not sweet in taste

43

a shrink

a psychiatrist or psychoanalyst

44

a zealot

a person who has very strong opinions about something, and tries to make other people have them too /= fanatyk

- 'a religious zealot'

45

to fabricate

to invent or produce something false in order to deceive someone

- 'He was late, so he fabricated an excuse to avoid trouble.'

46

a faux pas

words or behaviour that are a social mistake or not polite /= gafa, nietakt

47

to take every measure

podejmować wszelkie środki
= to take action to achieve a particular purpose

48

to allege

to say that someone has done something illegal or wrong without giving proof

49

to set about sth

to start to do or deal with something

- 'I tried to apologize, but I think I set about it the wrong way.'

50

to undermine

to make someone less confident, less powerful, or less likely to succeed, or to make something weaker, often gradually

- 'Criticism just undermines their confidence.'

51

to dwindle

to become smaller in size or amount, or fewer in number

- 'The community has dwindled to a tenth of its former size in the last two years.'

52

to subside

If a condition subsides, it becomes less strong or extreme

- 'The police are hoping that the violence will soon subside.'

53

to seesaw

to change repeatedly from one emotion, situation, etc. to another and then back again

- 'His mind seesawed between hope and despair all through those weeks.'

54

to intersperse

to mix one thing in with another in a way that is not regular

- 'The documentary intersperses graphical animations with film clips of the actual event.'

55

elation [U]

a state of extreme happiness or excitement

56

strung out

very tired and worried

57

a catch-22 situation

an impossible situation where you are prevented from doing one thing until you have done another thing that you cannot do until you have done the first thing

58

to obfuscate

to make something less clear and harder to understand, especially intentionally

59

compliance [U]

the act of obeying an order, rule, or request

60

to swig

to drink, especially by swallowing large amounts in a series of single actions
*a swig

61

an ambiguity [C/U]

the fact of something having more than one possible meaning and therefore possibly causing confusion

- 'We wish to remove any ambiguity concerning our demands.'

62

stale

no longer new or fresh, usually as a result of being kept for too long

- 'The bread/biscuits/cake had gone stale.'

63

to repent of

to be very sorry for something bad you have done in the past and wish that you had not done it

- 'He repented (of his sins) just hours before he died.'

64

to convey

to express a thought, feeling, or idea so that it is understood by other people

- 'Few journalists have managed to convey the full horror of the situation.'

65

contrition [U]

a feeling of sorrow and guiltt for something bad that you have done

66

commendable

deserving praise

67

timely (adj.)

happening at the best possible moment

- 'a timely reminder'

68

arcane

mysterious and known only by a few people

69

a layman

someone who does not have special knowledge of a subject

- 'Could you please explain that in layman's terms (= in a simple way) ?'

70

to rustle

If things such as paper or leaves rustle, or if you rustle them, they move about and make a soft, dry sound
* a rustle [S]

71

telltale

revealing, indicating, or betraying something

- 'She found lipstick on his shirts - the telltale sign that he was having an affair.'

72

a boulder

a very large rock

73

a specimen

something shown or examined as an example; a typical example /= okaz

- 'He has a collection of rare insect specimens.'

74

a nuisance

something or someone that annoys you or causes trouble for you

- 'I've forgotten my umbrella - what a nuisance!'

75

altogether

in total, completely

- 'She wrote less and less often, and eventually she stopped altogether.'
- 'I'm not altogether sure I want that (= I have doubts about it).'

76

taut

tight or completely stretched

- 'a taut rope'

77

to snarl

(of dogs) to make a deep, rough sound while showing the teeth, usually in anger
(of people) to speak or say something angrily and forcefully

- '"Go to hell!", he snarled.'

78

to bewilder

to confuse someone

- 'The instructions completely bewildered me.'

79

a muddle

an untidy or confused state

-'The documents were in a muddle.'
- 'Whenever I go to Europe I get in a muddle about/over (= become confused about) how much things cost.'

80

a facet

one part of a subject, situation, etc. that has many parts

- 'She has so many facets to her personality.'

81

notion

a belief or idea

- 'He has some fanciful notion about converting one room of his apartment into a gallery.'

82

vague

not clearly expressed, known, described, or decided

83

fanciful

not likely to succeed or happen in the real world

84

a motif

a pattern or design

- 'We chose some curtains with a flower motif.'

85

to facilitate

to make something possible or easier

86

a host of

a large number of something

- 'There's a whole host of reasons why he didn't get the job.'

87

to grapple with sth

to try to deal with or understand a difficult problem or subject

- 'Today, many Americans are still grappling with the issue of race.'

88

clutter

(a lot of objects in) a state of being untidy

- 'Sorry about the clutter in the kitchen.'

89

esoteric

very unusual and understood or liked by only a small number of people, especially those with special knowledge

90

to extrapolate

to guess or think about what might happen using information that is already known /= przewidywać, wnioskować

- 'You can't really extrapolate a trend from such a small sample.'

91

to look down on sb

to think that you are better than someone

92

all-encompassing

including or covering everything or everyone; comprehensive

93

to look right through someone

to pretend not to see someone even while your eyes are directed toward that person

- 'I smiled at him, but he looked right through me.'

94

to gut

to remove the inner organs of an animal, especially in preparation for eating it

- 'She gutted the fish and cut off their heads.'

95

surreptitious

done secretly, without anyone seeing or knowing

- 'I couldn't help noticing her surreptitious glances at the clock.'

96

detrimental

causing harm or damage

- 'These chemicals have a detrimental effect on the environment.'

97

to cite

to mention something as proof for a theory or as a reason why something has happened

- 'She cited three reasons why people get into debt.'

98

to commemorate

to recall and show respect for (someone or something)
*commemorative

- 'We commemorate those who lost their lives in the war.'

99

resultant

caused by the event or situation that you have just mentioned /= wynikły, wypadkowy

100

to empathize (with)

to be able to understand how someone else feels

- 'It's very easy to empathize with the characters in her books.'