2.2 Class Inequalities In Poverty Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in 2.2 Class Inequalities In Poverty Deck (29)
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1

What is poverty?

The state or condition of having little or no money, goods or means of support

2

What is absolute poverty?

Lack of basic essentials needed for survival e.g. Food, clothing, housing
Do not have minimum income to meet minimum requirements

3

(Absolute) Bradshaw tried to develop a budget standard of poverty by calculating what?

What is needed to afford an acceptable living standard based on a costed list of items deemed essential

4

(Absolute) criticism - measures of absolute poverty only take into account what?

What is needed for survival

5

(Absolute) criticism - what do measures of absolute poverty not take into account?

What is required to participate in society e.g. Holidays, presents, to not necessities but are seen as social necessities

6

What does relative poverty involve?

Judging whether income is so far below average they are excluded from a normal lifestyle

7

(Relative) this definition makes poverty relative - why?

Will change overtime
Will chance between society e.g. Poverty in U.K. will be higher than India due to higher standard of living

8

(Relative) what is a problem in measuring relative poverty?

Deciding which items are necessities

9

(Relative) criticism - why will it never be possible to eradicate relative poverty?

There will always be people worse off

10

consensual poverty is measuring poverty by looking at direct measures of what?

living standards e.g. running a fridge, affording fresh fruit and veg

11

(consensual) Mack and Lansley asked what in group interviews?

which items of a list people saw as necessities

12

(consensual) Mack and Lansley - what did they include in the list?

items seen as necessities by more than 50% of respondents

13

(consensual) Mack and Lansely then did a survey of the population, how did they classify poor households?

lacking 3 or more necessities

14

(consensual) Mack and Lansely then did a survey of the population, how did they classify severe poverty households?

lacking 5 or more necessities

15

(consensual) Godon (2013) saw what since Mack and Lansley's study?

a major increase in poverty

16

(consensual) in 1983 Mack and Lansley found how many households lacked 3+ necessities?

14%

17

(consensual) in 2013, Gordon found how many households lacked 3+ necessities?

33%

18

(measuring UK poverty) in 1983 how many households were without heating?

5%

19

(measuring UK poverty) in 2012 how many households were without heating?

9%

20

(measuring UK poverty) in 1999 how many households were without fresh fruit and veg?

5%

21

(measuring UK poverty) in 2012 how many households were without fresh fruit and veg?

7%

22

(measuring UK poverty) in 1999 how many children went without going on a school trip every term?

2%

23

(measuring UK poverty) in 2012 how many children went without going on a school trip every term?

8%

24

(child poverty) how many children are in relative poverty?

1.4 million

25

(child poverty) a family is seen as in relative poverty if their income is how far below average?

60%

26

(child poverty) how many children are in poverty?(2013/14)

3/10

27

(child poverty) how many children with one parent in work are in poverty?

2/3

28

(child poverty) is it increasing or decreasing?

increasing

29

what is HBAI?

households below average income
annual publication of poverty statistics

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