Histology - 514-4,5,6,7 Flashcards Preview

Tim's Cards > Histology - 514-4,5,6,7 > Flashcards

Flashcards in Histology - 514-4,5,6,7 Deck (64):
1

What does cortical mean?

cortex - around the outside

2

What does the PDL connect?

The cementum around the tooth to the alveolar bone

3

What type of collagen is the PDL composed of?

Type I, III, VII

4

What are the most abundant cells in the PDL?

Fibroblasts

5

The PDL alveolar attachment is equivalent to what structure in bone?

Periosteum

6

What cells form new bone after tooth extraction?

PDL fibroblasts > osteoblasts

7

Do Sharpey's fibers blend into cementum?

Yes
hard to see on slide

8

What is the term for alveolar bone directly lining a tooth?

Bundle Bone
(refers to Sharpey's Fibers)

9

What nerve innervates the PDL?

Trigeminal V

10

What is very tightly related to nerve endings in the PDL?

Collagen fibers

11

What type of fibers are oxytalan and what do they do?

Elastic.
Absorptive and keep vasculature open in PDL

12

Name the 5 principal fiber types of the PDL

1. Alveolar Crest Group
2. Horizontal Group
3. Oblique Group
4. Apical Group
5. Interradicular Group

13

What is the additional fiber ligament that connects teeth to bone and has "memory"?

Transseptal ligament

14

Transseptal fibers are part of...

The GL (gingival ligament)

15

Where is the GL found?

Above the PDL in lamina propria

16

What are the five fiber bundles found in the GL?

Dentogingival, alveologingival, circular, dentoperiosteal, transseptal

17

What are the 3 general categories of tooth movement?

Preeruptive, eruptive, posteruptive

18

What are gubernacular canals?

cords of fibrous tissue creating a path for eruption.

19

Why is root formation not a cause of eruption?

Think tree

20

Why does alveolar bone remodeling not explain tooth eruption?

only explains how pathway was cleared

21

What is the best (however incomplete) model for tooth eruption?

PDL formation as motive force

22

What side does most of the resorption of deciduous teeth occur on?

Lingual

23

What side do permanent teeth develop relative to deciduous?

Lingual

24

What happens when a permanent tooth contacts a deciduous tooth from below?

Resorption happens at the root end of the deciduous tooth

25

What prefix is everything tooth?

Odonto (as opposed to osteo)

26

T/F
Odontoclasts are histologically identical to osteoclasts

True

27

What are 3 reasons for posteruptive tooth movement?

accommodation for growth (age 14-18)
compensation for continued occlusal wear
accommodation for inter proximal wear (mesial drift)

28

What undergoes hyalinization on the compression side of orthodontic tooth movement?

hyalinization (loss of cells in the PDL)

29

If forces are too heavy in tooth movement, what occurs?

Odontoclast resorption of dentin.

30

Is pressure from erupting permanent tooth necessary for deciduous tooth loss?

No, although it does cause resorption on the side being resorbed.

31

Define synostosis

Bony joint - immovable, and fused by osseous tissue
(think left and right mandible)

32

Name four types of joints.

Bony
Fibrous
Cartilaginous
Synovial

33

The left and right mandible are separated by what kind of joint?

Synostoses / Bony

34

Name 3 types of fibrous joints.

serrate sutures (cranial)
squamous sutures
plane/butt sutures (palate)

35

Attachment of a tooth to its socket is a joint called a,

gomphosis

36

example of sydesmosis

tibia to fibula (movable and fibrous)

37

Example of synchondrosis

hyaline cartilage from sternum to ribs.

38

What is an example of a symphysis (cartilaginous joint)?

Pubic symphysis
Intervertebral discs

39

What are the most freely moveable joints?

Synovial

40

What articulation makes up the TMJ?

mandibular condyle with the mandibular fossa (glenoid fossa) of the temporal bone

41

Is there any cartilage on cartilage action in the TMJ?

No - because of articular disk

42

What is articular cartilage composed of?

coarse collagen fibers (dense fibrous connective tissue)

43

What is TMJ syndrome caused by?

malocclusion, injury, arthritis

44

What is a broad term for joint pain/inflammation?

arthritis

45

In which type of arthritis is articular cartilage worn away?

osteoarthritis

46

What type of arthritis is an autoimmune response?

Rheumatoid
cells attack joint as if it was a pathogen and degrades cartilage

47

Is glucosamine/chondroitin an effective means to treat osteoarthritis?

No

48

Why are tendon sheaths in the hands/feet unique?

They wrap tendons in synovial fluid.

49

What is a bursa?

saclike extension of a joint capsule that lubricates nearby tendons (think shoulder)

50

How many muscles in the human body?

About 600

51

What percentage of body heat is produced by muscle activity?

85%

52

The _______ blends with tendon to lend more structural integrity.

Periosteum

53

The dense irregular connective tissue that surrounds a whole muscle is called...

epimysium

54

What heavier connective tissue does the epimysium blend with?

The deep fascia

55

What connective tissue surrounds fascicles of muscle cells?

perimysium

56

What connective tissue surrounds a muscle cell?

Endomysium

57

Are sharpey's fibers stronger than tendon?

Yes.
Stress tears tendon before pulling tendon from muscle or bone.

58

What are the flat, sheet-like tendons under the palm (and scalp and foot)?

aponeuroses

59

Give examples of fusiform, convergent, and parallel muscles.

bicep, pecs, aaaabs (have tendinous intersections)

60

What's an example of a circular muscle?

orbicularis oris

61

What is a fixator muscle?

Holds origin in place - such as muscle holding scapula during bicep flexion

62

What neurons activate skeletal muscles?

motor neurons

63

What is an afferent sensory neuron?

one that propagates signal toward the CNS and brain

64

What are two types of efferent motor neurons

Somatic
Autonomic

Decks in Tim's Cards Class (140):