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Flashcards in Endo Exam Deck (57):
1

Normal Pulp:

A clinical diagnostic category in which the pulp is symptom-free and normally responsive to pulp testing.

2

Reversible Pulpitis:

A clinical diagnosis based upon subjective and objective findings indicating that the inflammation should resolve and the pulp return to normal.

3

Symptomatic Irreversible Pulpitis:

A clinical diagnosis based on subjective and objective findings indicating that the vital inflamed pulp is incapable of healing.
Additional descriptors: Lingering thermal pain, spontaneous pain, referred pain.

4

Asymptomatic Irreversible Pulpitis:

A clinical diagnosis based on subjective and objective findings indicating that the vital inflamed pulp is incapable of healing.
Additional descriptors: No clinical symptoms but inflammation produced by caries, caries excavation, trauma, etc.

5

Pulp Necrosis:

A clinical diagnostic category indicating death of the dental pulp. The pulp is usually nonresponsive to pulp testing.

6

Previously Treated:

A clinical diagnostic category indicating that the tooth has been endodontically treated and the canals are obturated with various filling materials other than intracanal medicaments.

7

Previously Initiated Therapy:

A clinical diagnostic category indicating that the tooth has been previously treated by partial endodontic therapy (e.g., pulpotomy, pulpectomy).

8

Normal Apical Tissues:

Teeth with normal periradicular tissues that are not sensitive to percussion or palpation testing. The lamina dura surrounding the root is intact and the periodontal ligament space is uniform.

9

Symptomatic Apical Periodontitis:

Inflammation, usually of the apical periodontium, producing clinical symptoms including a painful response to biting and/or percussion or palpation. It may or may not be associated with an apical radiolucent area.

10

Asymptomatic Apical Periodontitis:

Inflammation and destruction of apical periodontium that is of pulpal origin, appears as an apical radiolucent area, and does not produce clinical symptoms.

11

Acute Apical Abscess:

An inflammatory reaction to pulpal infection and necrosis characterized by rapid onset, spontaneous pain, tenderness of the tooth to pressure, pus formation and swelling of associated tissues.

12

Chronic Apical Abscess:

An inflammatory reaction to pulpal infection and necrosis characterized by gradual onset, little or no discomfort, and the intermittent discharge of pus through an associated sinus tract.

13

Condensing Osteitis:

Diffuse radiopaque lesion representing a localized bony reaction to a low-grade inflammatory stimulus, usually seen at apex of tooth.

14

Color of the Endo files, .06

.08

.10

.15

.20

.25

.30

.35

.40

.45

.50

.55

.60

Pink

Grey

Purple

White

Yellow

Red

Blue

Green

Black

White

Yellow

Red

Blue

15

The root end anatomy of the apical constriction is referred to as what?

Minor apical diameter (apical constrictor)

Major apical diameter (apical foramen)

16

Which of the following is the closest percentage of maxillary molars that have 4 canals?

90-90%

17

What is the closest percentage of mandibular anteriors that have 2 canals?

41.4%

18

What tooth has a C shape root?

Mb canine

19

Maxillary 1st bicuspid commonly have how many roots and how many canals?

2 roots

2 canals

20

Maxillary 2nd bicuspid commonly have how many roots and how many canals?

1 root

1 canal

21

Maxillary 1st molars in the MB2 canal is located where?

MB2 lingual/mesial to MB1

(mesial palatal)

22

Mb 1st premolars frequently have how many canals?

1 canal

70% of the time

23

In hand files what does D0 to D16 mean?

Length of cutting part of file

24

What does 02, 04, 06 refer to?

taper

25

What is the major component of guta percha?

Zinc Oxide (for stability) 75%

26

Can GP alone seal the canal?

No, needs sealer

27

What is NOT a property of a good sealer? (1)

What are 3 properties of sealer?

Does NOT clean the canal - soluble in tissue fluid

Fills voids, chelates, fills lateral canals

28

As you instrument the canal how does the length change?

It gets shorter

29

4 facts about Smear Layer:

product of cleaning/shaping

biofilm of inorganic/organic particles

can block tubules

Hypochlorite will NOT remove

30

Will crown down prep eliminate everything from exiting the apex of the tooth?

False

31

3 properties of NaOCl

1 thing doesn't do:

bactericidal, proteolytic, cleansing

doesn't remove smear layer (not chelating agent)

32

EDTA is _____

Pro lube

*17% EDTA

33

What does EDTA do?

Chelating agens - removes smear layer

reduces friction

34

Does the pulp always exit at the end of the root?

No

35

Can you fill GP in dry canal?

No

36

What is the min. glide path that you should have before going to the rotary?

20

37

All of the following can be a factor used to determine end-pointing in cleaning and shaping the root canal system.
Rariographic width, type of tooth, width of root canal, anatomic configuration - What is NOT relevant?

Type of tooth

38

How are obturation pluggers sized?

Measuring block

39

Color sequence of files:

06 salmon
08 gray
10 purple
15 white
20 yellow
25 red
30 blue
35 green
40 black
45 white
50 yellow

40

The pulp chamber is always located at the center of the tooth at the level of what?

CEJ

41

Utilizing warm gutta percha technique, it is ok NOT to use sealer.

False!!

42

The outline form of a Mb molar with 4 canals is what?

Trapezoidal

43

Is a size 45 tip the same for 02, 04, 06?

Yes

44

What is the diameter of a 06 45 file 2mm from end?

.57 mm

(.12 + .45)

45

A clinical diagnostic category in which the pulp is symptom-free and normally responsive to pulp testing

Normal pulp

46

A clinical diagnosis based upon subjective and objective findings indicating that the inflammation should resolve and the pulp return to normal

Reversible Pulpitis

47

A clinical diagnosis based on subjective and objective findings indicating that the vital inflamed pulp is incapable of healing. Additional descriptors: Lingering thermal pain, spontaneous pain, referred pain

Symptomatic Irreversible Pulpitis

48

A clinical diagnosis based on subjective and objective findings indicating that the vital inflamed pulp is incapable of healing. Additional descriptors: No clinical symptoms but inflammation produced by caries, caries excavation, trauma, etc.

Asymptomatic Irreversible Pulpitis

49

A clinical diagnostic category indicating death of the dental pulp. The pulp is usually nonresponsive to pulp testing.

Pulp necrosis

50

A clinical diagnostic category indicating that the tooth has been endodontically treated and the canals are obturated with various filling materials other than intracanal medicaments.

Previously Treated

51

A clinical diagnostic category indicating that the tooth has been previously treated by partial endodontic therapy (e.g., pulpotomy, pulpectomy

Previously Initiated Therapy

52

Teeth with normal periradicular tissues that are not sensitive to percussion or palpation testing. The lamina dura surrounding the root is intact and the periodontal ligament space is uniform

Normal Apical Tissues

53

Inflammation, usually of the apical periodontium, producing clinical symptoms including a painful response to biting and/or percussion or palpation. It may or may not be associated with an apical radiolucent area

Symptomatic Apical Periodontitis

54

Inflammation and destruction of apical periodontium that is of pulpal origin, appears as an apical radiolucent area, and does not produce clinical symptoms

Asymptomatic Apical Periodontitis

55

An inflammatory reaction to pulpal infection and necrosis characterized by rapid onset, spontaneous pain, tenderness of the tooth to pressure, pus formation and swelling of associated tissues

Acute Apical Abscess

56

An inflammatory reaction to pulpal infection and necrosis characterized by gradual onset, little or no discomfort, and the intermittent discharge of pus through an associated sinus tract

Chronic Apical Abscess

57

Diffuse radiopaque lesion representing a localized bony reaction to a low-grade inflammatory stimulus, usually seen at apex of tooth

Condensing Osteitis

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