Compartments of the Leg: Talocrural Joint and Foot Flashcards Preview

Structure and Function Test 1 > Compartments of the Leg: Talocrural Joint and Foot > Flashcards

Flashcards in Compartments of the Leg: Talocrural Joint and Foot Deck (81):
1

The deep fascia of the leg is called the

Crural fascia

2

Extending from the crural fascia are three intermuscular septa, called the

Anterior, posterior, and transverse septa

3

The leg is compartmentalized by the intermuscular septa and the interosseous membrane connecting the

Tibia and Fibula

4

Distally, the crural fascia forms structures that prevent bowstringing of the tendons crossing the ankle joint. These are called

Retinaculua

5

The leg can be organized into which 4 compartments?

Anterior, lateral, superficial posterior, and deep posterior

6

The leg bones are the

Tibia (medial) and Fibula (lateral)

7

The anterior leg muscles function in

Dorsiflexion and digit extension

8

The muscles of the lateral leg function in

Foot eversion

9

The muscles of the superficial posterior leg function in

Foot plantar flexion

10

The muscles of the deep posterior compartment function in

Plantar flexion and digit flexion

11

The muscles of the anterior leg compartment are innervated by the

Deep fibrular nerve

12

The muscles of the lateral leg compartment are innervated by the

Superficial fibrular nerve

13

The muscles of the superficial posterior and deep posterior compartments are innervated by the

Tibial nerve

14

What are the 4 anterior leg muscles?

Tibialis anterior, extensor hallucis longus, extensor digitorum longus, and peroneus tertius

15

Which anterior leg muscles function in dorsiflexion?

All of them

16

Which anterior leg muscles function in foot INVERSION

Tibialis anterior

17

Which anterior leg muscles function in digit extension?

Extensor hallucis longus and extensor digitorum longus

18

What are the two muscles of the lateral leg?

Peroneus longus and peroneus brevis

19

Both the peroneus longus and peroneus brevis both function in

Foot eversion

20

What are the three muscles of the superficial posterior leg?

Gastrocnemius, soleus, and plantaris

21

Which superficial posterior leg muscles function in Knee flexion?

Gastrocnemius and Plantaris

22

Which superficial posterior leg muscles function in foot plantarflexion?

Gastrocnemius, plantaris, and soleus

23

What are the 4 muscles of the deep posterior leg?

Popliteus, flexor hallucis longus, flexor digitorum longus, and tibialis posterior

24

Which deep posterior leg muscles function in knee unlocking?

Popliteus

25

Which deep posterior leg muscles function in digit flexion?

Flexor hallucis longus and flexor digitorum longus

26

Which deep posterior leg muscle function in foot plantar flexion?

Tibialis posterior, flexor hallucis longus, and flexor digitorum longus

27

Which deep posterior leg muscles function in foot inversion?

Tibialis posterior

28

A part of the calcaneus which supports the talus

-where the spring ligament attaches

Sustentaculum tali

29

The spring ligament attaches to the

Sustentaculum tali

30

Articulation between the trochlea of the talus and the distal tibia and fibula

Talocrural joint

31

The movements of dorsiflexion and plantarflexion occur at the

Talocrural joint

32

What are the four ankle and foot ligaments?

Medial collateral (deltoid), Lateral collateral, Plantar calcaneonavicular (spring), and long plantar

33

The medial collateral (deltoid) ligament attaches the

Tibia to the talus, calcaneus, and navicular. It also attaches talus to calcaneus

34

The medial collateral (deltoid) ligament function to

Provide medial support to ankle. Resists eversion

35

The lateral collateral ligament of the ankle attaches the

Fibular to the talus and calcaneus

36

The lateral collateral ligament of the ankle functions to

Provide lateral support to ankle. Resist inversion

37

The plantar calcaneonavicular (spring) ligament attaches the

Sustenaculum tali and navicular bone

38

The plantar calcaneonavicular (spring) ligament function to

Support head of talus in TCN joint and provide elasticity to the arch

39

The long plantar ligament attaches

Calcaneus, cuboid, and lateral 3 metatarsals

40

The long plantar ligament functions to

Provide lateral arch support to foot

41

The movements of dorsiflexion and plantarflexion occur between the

Trochlea of talus and medial malleolus of tibia and lateral malleolus of fibula

42

The movements of inversion and eversion occur at both the

Subtalar and transverse tarsal joints

43

Which leg muscles function in dorsiflexion?

Tibialis Anterior, Extensor Hallucis Longus, Extensor
Digitorum Longus

44

Which leg muscles function in plantarflexion?

Gastrocnemius, Soleus, Tibialis Posterior, Flexor
Digitorum Longus, Flexor Hallucis Longus

45

Which leg muscles function in inversion?

Tibialis anterior and tibialis posterior

46

Which leg muscles function in eversion?

Peroneus longus and peroneus brevis

47

The blood supply to the ankle and sole of the foot is via branches of the

Posterior tibial artery (called the medial and lateral plantar arteries)

48

The dorsum of the ankle and foot is supplied by the

-branch of anterior tibial artery

Dorsalis pedis artery

49

Ankle sprains are common occurences, with most being inverted sprains that stretch or tear the

Lateral collateral ligament of the ankle

50

The lateral collateral ligaments tend to tear from

Anterior to posterior with increasing severity

51

A painful inflammation of the plantar fascia that results from micro tears of the fascia due to repeated stress

Plantar fasciitis

52

A very common foot deformity in which the proximal phalanx of the big toe deviates laterally and the first metatarsal deviates medially

Hallux valgus

53

What happens in hallux valgus?

Proximal phalanx of big toe deviates laterall and first metatarsel deviates medially

54

Friction leads to swelling of the bursa overlying the medial site of the metatarsal head, creating a

Bunion

55

Injury of compression of the leg can lead to compartment syndrome because the crucial fascia is so tight. This would be relieved by a

Fasciotomy

56

Joint between talus and calcaneus.

-A hinge joint where we see eversion and inversion

Subtalar joint

57

Joint between talus, calcaneus, and navicular joint, and the calcaneocuboid joint

Transverse Tarsal joint

58

We get motions of inversion and eversion at the

Subtalar and Transverse tarsal joints

59

When the foot is dorsiflexed, abducted, and exerted we have

Pronation

60

When the foot is plantarflexed, addicted, and inverted we have

Supination

61

Pronation of the foot results in

Inner heel sole wear

62

Supination of the foot results in

Outer heel sole wear

63

Nerve in the sole of the foot that is equivalent to median nerve

Medial plantar nerve

64

Nerve in the sole of the foot that is equivalent to ulnar nerve

Lateral plantar nerve

65

Equivalent of radial and ulnar arteries in the foot

Lateral and medial plantar

66

The superficial artery of the foot

Lateral plantar

67

If you have occlusive disease in aortoiliac artery, there would be pain in the

Thigh and Buttock (also trouble maintaining erection)

68

Femoral occlusive disease would result in pain in the

Calf

69

Occlusive disease in popliteal or proximal tibial or fibular arteries presents with

Foot pain

70

What are the three joints of the ankle and what do they predominantly do?

1.) Talocrural (dorsiflexion and plantarflexion
2.) Subtalar (inversion and eversion)
3.) Transverse tarsal (midfoot inversion and eversion)

71

Which ligament from the ankle's LCL is most likely to be injured in an ankle sprain?

Anteriotalofibular ligament

72

Runs from the talus to the fibula and resists inversion

Anteriotalofibular ligament

73

The plantar fascia is analogous to the palmar aponeurosis, and where it attaches to the calcaneus is the location of

Plantar fasciaitis

74

What is the motor innervation of the dorsum surface of the foot?

Deep fibular

75

What is the sensory innervation of the dorsum surface of the foot?

Superficial Fibular (L5) and Deep fibular (only webbing between great toes)

76

The plantar surface of the foot receives motor and sensory innervation from branches of the tibial nerve called

Medial and lateral plantar nerves

77

When your foot falls asleep it is due to compression of the

Superficial fibular

78

Analogous to the median nerve in the hand

Medial plantar nerve

79

Analogous to the ulnar nerve in the hand

Lateral plantar nerve

80

The main blood supply for the foot is from the

-divides into medial and lateral plantar arteries

Posterior tibial artery

81

The predominant superficial arch of the foot is from the

Lateral plantar artery

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