Infratemporal Fossa Pt. 2 Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Infratemporal Fossa Pt. 2 Deck (69):
1

The nervous structures of the infratemporal fossa include the

Mandibular nerve (CN V3), Chorda tympani nerve (CN VII), and Lesser petrosal nerve (CN XI)

-and octic ganglion

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The main nerve for general sensory innervation in the head and motor innervation to skeletal muscle derivatives of the 1st pharyngeal arch with its third division

Trigeminal nerve (more specifically mandibular nerve V3)

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Sensory pseudounipolar neurons make up the
trigeminal ganglion of the

Middle cranial fossa

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Each of the trigeminal's 3 divisions exits through foramina in the

Middle cranial fossa

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CN V itself does not contain

Autonomic neurons

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However, all 4 parasympathetic cranial ganglia are associated with

-Travel on its branches

CN V

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The general sensory fibers of CN V1 (opthalmic nerve) are distributed to skin, mucosa, and conjunctiva of the

Front of the head and nose

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As the opthalmic nerve exits the cranium and enters the orbit via the superior orbital fissure, it branches into the

Nasociliary, frontal, and lacrimal nerves

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In the orbit, CN V1 is associated with the parasympathetic ciliary ganglion whose axons extend to supply the

Pupillary constrictor and Ciliary muscles

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How do you test the function of CN V1?

Corneal reflex

-touch the cornea and evoke a reflexive blink

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Provides sensation from cornea

CN V1

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Provides motor control to orbicularis oculi

CN VII

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Conveys sensation for skin and mucosa associated with the upper jaw

CN V2 (maxillary nerve)

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In the pterygopalatine fossa, CN V2 is associated with the parasympathetic pterygopalatine ganglion whose axons extend along branches of CN V2 and CN V1 to innervate the

Lacrimal gland in the orbit

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CN V! and CN V2 are purely

Sensory

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Serves are both sensory for the LOWER jaw region and motor for some skeletal muscles of the head

CN V3 (mandibular nerve)

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CN V3 leaves the middle cranial fossa via the

Foramen ovale

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All branches of the infratemporal nerve originate in the

Infratemporal fossa

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The sensory buccal branch is from

CN V3

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The motor innervation to the buccinator is from

CN VII

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A sensory branch of CN V3 that encircles the middle meningeal artery and wraps around the neck of the mandible

Auriculotemporal nerve

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Distributed to the TMJ, parotid sheath, external ear, tympanic membrane, and skin over the temple

Auriculotemporal nerve

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Carries parasympathetic postganglionic fibers from the octic ganglion to the parotid gland

Auriculotemporal nerve

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Conveys general sensation from the anterior ⅔ of the tongue, oral mucosa on floor of oral cavity, lingual gingiva of mandibular teeth

Lingual nerve of V3

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Special gustatory/taste sensation from the anterior
⅔ of the tongue is carried by sensory fibers in the

Chorda Tympani (CN VII)

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Joins the lingual nerve in the infratemporal fossa and travels along the lingual nerve to the tongue in the oral cavity

Chorda Tympani (from CN VII)

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Cross the lateral surface of the medial pterygoid into the oral cavity inferior to the LAST molar tooth

Lingual nerve and Chorda tympani

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The lingual nerve and sensory fibers of chorda tympani pass into the

Tongue

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Presynaptic parasympathetic fibers in the chorda tympani pass into and synapse on the

Submandibular ganglion (on the floor of the oral cavity)

-for secremotor activation

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Presynaptic parasympathetic fibers in the chorda tympani pass into and synapse on the submandibular ganglion (on the floor of the oral cavity) for secremotro activation of the

Submandibular and Sublingual glands

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Lingual nerve injury proximal to where chorda tympani joins in the infratemporal fossa produces

Ipsilateral loss of general sensation to the anterior 2/3 of the tongue, oral mucosa, and gingivae

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Injury distal to the union of the chorda tympani and lingual nerve in the infratemporal fossa results in

Ipsilateral general sensory loss PLUS loss of secretion from submandibular-sublingual salivary glands

-and loss of taste from anterior 2/3 of tongue

33

Mostly msensory nerve that gives off a motor branch right before it enters the mandibular foramen through the mandibular canal

Inferior alveolar nerve

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The inferior alveolar nerve gives off a motor branch to the

Mylohyoid and anterior belly of digastric

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In the mandibular canal, branches of the inferior alveolar nerve supply the sensation for the

Mandibular teeth

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The inferior alveolar nerve then pierces the mandibles anterior aspect via the mental foramen to supply sensation for the

Chin

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Anesthetizes all mandibular teeth to the median plane and skin-mucosa of the chin and lower lip

An inferior alveolar nerve block

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Accidental deep injection into the medial pterygoid during an inferior alveolar nerve block would temporarily affect the ability to

Open the mouth (due to pterygoid trismus)

39

Supply most of the muscles of f the first pharyngeal arch: muscles that move the mandible (muscles of mastication and some suprahyoids) and tensor
muscles (tensor tympani in the middle ear and tensor veli palatini of the soft palate)

Motor branches of the mandibular nerve (CN V3)

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Both the middle ear (tympanic cavity) and infratemporal fossa are associated with components of the autonomic motor supply to the

Major salivary glands

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To reach the parotid gland with parasympathetic innervation, Presynaptic neuron cell bodies originate in salivary nuclei of the brainstem with axons extending through

CN IX

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As CN IX exits the cranium via the jugular foramen, its tympanic nerve branches through a small canaliculus to enter the

Middle ear in the petrous parts of temporal bone

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In the middle ear, the tympanic nerve forms the tympanic plexus, which gives rise to the

Lesser petrosal nerve

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The lesser petrosal nerve (of CN IX) penetrates the roof of the tympanic cavity to enter the

Middle cranial fossa

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The lesser petrosal nerve then leaves the MCF with the mandibular enrve via the foramen ovale to enter the infratemporal fossa where it synapses in the

Octic ganglion

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Axons from neuron cell bodies in the octic ganglion travel along the

Auriculotemporal nerve to the parotid gland

47

Located in the external carotid nerve plexus and the
activity of these fibers may REDUCE secretion from the gland

-apparent as dry mouth when nervous

Sympathetic post synaptic fibers (from cell bodies in cervical ganglia)

48

To reach the submandibular and sublingual glands with parasympathetic innervation, Presynaptic neuron cell bodies originate in the brainstem salivary nuclei with axons extending through

CN VII

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As CN VII travels through the internal acoustic meatus and facial canal, the chorda tympani branches through the middle ear MEDIAL to

The handle of the malleus (attached to tympanic membrane)

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The chorda tympani then leaves the middle ear via the Petrotympanic fissure (between tympanic and petrous parts of temporal bone) to enter the

Infratemporal fossa

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Once in the infratemporal fossa, the chorda tympani decends to join the

Lingual nerve

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Contains both special sensory taste fibers conveying taste from the ANTERIOR 2/3 of the tongue and parasympathetic presynaptic fibers

Chorda tympani

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Parasympathetic presynaptic fibers of the chorda tympani (CN VII) synapse in the

-hanging off the lingual nerve in the floor of theoral cavity

Submandibular ganglion

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Post synaptic parasympathetic axons then extend to activate secretion of

Submandibular-sublingual glands

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The superior boundary of infratemporal fossa is the greater wing of the sphenoid, which contains the

Foramen Ovale and Foramen Spinosum

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Permits passage of the mandibular nerve and lesser petrosal nerve from the middle cranial fossa into the infratemporal fossa

Foramen Ovale

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Permits passage of the middle meningeal artery from the infratemporal fossa to the middle cranial fossa

Foramen spinosum

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The parietal, frontal, greater wing of sphenoid, squamous part of temporal meet at a weak area of
the skull called the

Pterion

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Located two fingers breadth superior to the zygomatic arch and one fingers beadth posterior to the frontal process of zygomatic bone

Pterion

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Fracture of the pterion may rupture the underlying

Frontal branch of middle meningeal artery

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Inferiorly, the medial pterygoid muscle attaches to the

Medial aspect of the mandible ramus (near its angle)

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The lateral boundary of the infrtemporal fossa is the

Medial surface of the ramus of mandible

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The medial surface of the ramus of the mandible contains the mandibular foramen that transmits the

Inferior alveolar nerve and artery (of maxillary artery)

64

The medial surface of the ramus of the mandible,
which contains the mandibular foramen that transmits the inferior alveolar nerve (of CN V3) and artery (of maxillary artery) out of the infratemporal fossa and through the mandible to eventually exit through
the mental foramen as the

Mental nerve and artery of the chin

65

The medial wall of the infratemporal fossa is the

Lateral pterygoid plate of the sphenoid

66

The anterior wall of the infratemporal fossa is the

Posterior surface of the maxilla

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Lies between the medial and anterior walls of the infratemporal fossa and it allows for communication between the infratemporal fossa and the deeper, more medial pterygopalatine fossa

Pterygomaxillary fissure

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Passes from the infratemporal fossa to the pterygopalatine fossa via the pterygomaxillary fissure

The third (most distal) part of the maxillary artery

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The posterior wall of the infratemporal fossa is formed by the

Tympanic plate, styloid process, and the mastoid process of the temporal bone

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