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Flashcards in Lecture 3 Deck (40):
1

Moral Panic

Refers to antisocial and criminal behaviour. It is an exaggerated reaction from the media, police, and public to the activities of a particular social group.

2

What do you need to start moral panic?

All you need is a narrative that media producers find compelling.

3

What does moral panic lead to?

This leads to an increase in general anxiety and concern over what is represented in the media.

4

Overreaction in moral panic leads to...

Magnification of the original concern.

5

Moral panic leads to social group being viewed as ___ ___.

Folk devils.

6

Folk Devils

Demonized group or individual, and is the central phenomenon of a moral panic.

7

Moral panic extends blame to...

Not only internet pedophiles, but also extended to ISP’s, commercial bodies, and police.

8

Satanic Ritual Abuse

Extreme physical and sexual abuse of children by devil worshipping satanist networks. Drinking blood, eating feces, impregnating victims so babies can be used for sacrifice.

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Satanic Ritual Abuse Scandal

- Michelle Remembers is a book about how Michelle was abused in her childhood.
- However, this whole book was found to be fabricated.
- Hoax turned out to be moral panic.
- People brought up accusations of satanic ritual abuse that were false.

10

True or false? The vast majority of satanic abuse cases never happened.

True.

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What triggered the nationwide crusade against satanic abuse?

Moral panic.

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What happened to the standard of proof during the nationwide crusade against satanic abuse?

Proof became construed as coerced confessions and ambiguous behaviours by the alleged victims and abusers.

13

Volatility element of moral panic:

- Sudden eruption and subsiding of a concern of a newly perceived threat to society.
- Threat comes from media portrayal of moral deviance.

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Hostility element of moral panic:

These deviants are enemies of the basic values of society. Attributed to evil, morally corrupt behaviour.

15

Measurable Concern element of moral panic:

Concern of the public is measurable in concrete ways (i.e. surveys).

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Consensus element of moral panic:

Significant portion of the population needs to consider it a serious threat.

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What is the most important element of moral panic?

Disproportionality.

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Disproportionality element of moral panic:

Takes issues way overboard. Concern about the numbers of moral deviance, and the extent of the harm they can do is exaggerated.

19

Disproportionality element of moral panic:

Takes issues way overboard. Concern about the numbers of moral deviance, and the extent of the harm they can do is exaggerated.

20

Moral Panic full definition:

A moral panic is a form of collective behaviour characterized by suddenly increased concern and hostility in a significant segment of society in reaction to widespread beliefs about a newly perceived threat that is over exaggerated.

21

Consequences of moral panic:

- Social movements aimed at eliminating deviance.
- Generate moral crusades and political struggles to use law to suppress these things.

22

What does the Rape on Campus scandal prompt us to question?

Does the moral panic hysteria match the information provided?

23

Media

Any form of communication that targets an audience in print or electronic format.

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Why is media important?

Defines social problems, shapes public debates.

25

What are the two approaches to studying the impact of media?

Administrative and critical.

26

Administrative approach to studying media:

Similar to the objectivist viewpoint of deviance. Studies the effects of media on individuals’ thoughts, feelings, and behaviours. Who says what to whom, and to what effects.

27

Examples of administrative approach to studying media:

Advertising.

28

Emotional advertisements must evoke ___ feelings.

Positive.

29

What is a new form of advertisement?

Product placement.

30

There is a ___ statistical correlation that is statistically significant between media violence and aggression.

Small.

31

Media Framing

The overall picture of how an issue is depicted in the media. It affects what we think about a particular topic and come to understand social issues.

32

Media frames of ethnic minorities:

- That they are invisible.
- Stereotypes.
- As social problems.
- Adornment or decoration.
- White-washed.

33

Feminine frames presented by media:

- Feminine touch.
- Ritualization of subordination.
- Licensed withdrawal.
- Infantilization.

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Feminine Touch

Touching in a delicate, soft manner. Bent hand and bent wrists. Light pressing of skin.

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Ritualization of Subordination

- Power roles. Person on top is superior. Person placed lower in the frame is portrayed as subordinate.
- Bent knees, tilted head, childish stance.

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Licensed Withdrawal

- Women are portrayed as psychologically removed from situation. They have to rely on others. Averted gaze.
- Fear or uneasiness.
- Hands and fingers cover face.

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Infantilization

Made to seem like a child.

38

Does violence and sex actually sell?

- People are attuned to cues like sex and violence, but these cues are at the expense of other cues.
- Violent media impairs brand recognition. Focus is on violence, not on product they sell us.

39

What type of advertisers are the only ones that do not understand that sex and violence does not sell?

Alcohol.

40

Advertisements are most effective when...

They sell an experience or a story.