Regions of Brain/ Blood Supply and Lesions (4-5 Star!!) Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Regions of Brain/ Blood Supply and Lesions (4-5 Star!!) Deck (26):
1

* What symptoms would occlusion of anterior cerebral artery produce?

1. motor/ sensory issues of lower limb and foot

*sensory if more posterior; motor if more anterior, can be both
*unilateral occlusion would produce sx on contralateral side

2

*what symptoms would occlusion of middle cerebral artery produce?

1. motor/sensory issues in upper limbs (hand) and face; also affects Broca's area

3

What symptoms would be seen with Posterior cerebral artery occlusion? Why?

Vision loss--> serves occipital lobe

4

What hemisphere is dominant for most people?

Left (usually opposite to hand you write with, but not always)

5

What deficits seen in Broca's aphasia?

Can comprehend, but not reply in complete sentences or may put words in wrong order/ leave them out

*non-fluent aphasia; Brocas controls motor function of mouth

6

What deficits seen in Wernicke's aphasia?

Cannot comprehend; can speak in full sentences, but they dont make any sense (W = What?)

*fluent aphasia--> Wernicke's is the associative auditory cortex

7

What deficits seen in Conduction aphasia? What is damaged?

Interuption of arcuate fasciculus, which connects Broca's to Wernicke's--> Can speak and understand, but CANNOT REPEAT

*no connection between what they hear and what they say since arcuate is lost

8

What is damaged in global aphasia? Deficits?

Both Broca's and Wernicke's affected; non-fluent aphasia + impaired comprehension of speech

9

What happens if Broca's is damaged on the right side (or non-dominant Broca's aphasia)?

Cannot express emotion or inflection in speech

10

What happens in non-dominant (right side usually) damage to Wernicke's (non-dominant Wernicke aphasia)?

Cannot understand emotion or inflection in speech

11

Hyperorality, hypersexuality, disinhibited behavior.. whaere is lesion? Name of issue?

Bilateral lesion of amygdala--> Kluver- Bucy syndrome

12

Defects in concentration, logical thought, orientation, disinhibition, personality change and reemergence of primitive reflexes

Frontal lobe lesion

*due to atrophy if chronic; ischemia if acute

13

hemispatial neglect

lesion to non-dominant parietal lobe (usually the right)

14

*** inability to write, calculate, finger agnosia and left-right disorientation--> name of issue and where is the lesion

Gertsman syndrome--> lesion in dominant parietal lobe, usually at the angular gyrus

15

Confusion, opthalmoplegia, ataxia, memory loss with confabulation, personality changes--> where is lesion and what is d/o?

Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome--> lesion in mamillary bodies (bilateral); associated with thiamine (B1) deficiency, common cause is alcholism

16

Tremor at rest, chorea

Basal ganglia

17

tremors only when initiating movement (intention tremor), limb ataxia, loss of balance--> where is lesion

Cerebellar hemisphere--> falls to side of lesion; deficits are ipsilateral to lesion

18

truncal ataxia, dysarthria

Cerebellar vermis lesion--> affects things in the midline

19

Amnesia

Hippocampal lesion

20

eyes deviate away from lesion

PPRF

21

eyes deviate toward lesion

Frontal eye field

22

Paralysis of upward gaze--> lesion and what is this symptom called?

Supperior colliculus lesion--> paralysis of upward gaze called Parinaud's syndrome

23

Carotids come from which aortic arch

3rd

*C is 3d letter of alphabet

24

What three structures are in the carotid sheath

Carotid a (common and internal), internal jugular v, vagus n.

25

Main blood supply to brainstem and cerebellum

1. Vertebral artery
2. Basilar artery

26

Before joining basilar artery, what two arteries does the vertebral give off

1. Anterior spinal a.
2. Posterior inferior cerebellar a.

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