Modules 32-33 Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Modules 32-33 Deck (17):
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Alfred Binet

Started modern intelligence testing by developing questions that would predict children's future progress in the Parish school system.

1

Intelligence quotient

IQ = mental age/chronological age • 100

2

Aptitude tests

Are intended to protect your ability to learn a new skill and future performance.

3

Achievement tests

Are intended to reflect what you have already learned.

4

Standardization

Standardizing a test involves administering the test to a representative sample to a future test takers in order to establish a basis of meaningful comparison.

5

Normal curve

Standardized tests establish a normal distribution of scores on the test and population, a bell shaped pattern called the normal curve.

6

Flynn effect

In the past 60 years intelligence scores of Studley risen by an average of 27 points, a phenomenon known as the Flynn effect.

7

Reliable

When I test you will consistent results. To establish reliability researchers must establish different procedures, such as split half reliability, reliability using different tests, and test-retest reliability.

8

Split half reliability

Dividing the test into two equal halves and assessing how consistent the scores are.

9

Reliability using different tests

Using different forms of the test to measure consistency between them.

10

Test retest reliability

Using the same test on two occasions to measure consistency.

11

Validity

Refers to what the test is supposed to measure or predict. Content validity or predictive validity.

12

Content validity

Refers to the extent a test measures a particular behavior or treat. For example of course final.

13

Predictive validity

Refers to the function of the test and predicting a particular behavior or treat. Predictive power of aptitude scores weekends as children grow older.

14

Mentally retarded

People that have an IQ of below 70, and are required constant supervision a few decades ago but with support a family environment in special-education cannot care for themselves.

15

Genetic influences

Studies of twins, family members, and adopted children together support the idea that there is a significant genetic contribution to intelligence.

16

Stereotype threat

Stereotype threat is a self confirming concerned that one will be evaluated based on a negative stereotype.