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Flashcards in The Eye of the World_31 Deck (500):
1

he said quickly.

he said quickly.

2

Egwene stared at him openly before she caught herself, [shikashi] he pressed on with the [shinjitsu] – or a [bājon] of it.

Egwene stared at him openly before she caught herself, but he pressed on with the truth – or a version of it.

3

The two of them had left the Two [kawa] to see Caemlyn.

The two of them had left the Two Rivers to see Caemlyn.

4

On the [michi] they had heard of the [iseki] of a great [toshi], [shikashi] when they found Shadar Logoth, there were Trollocs there.

On the way they had heard of the ruins of a great city, but when they found Shadar Logoth, there were Trollocs there.

5

The two of them managed to [dasshutsu] across the [kawa] Arinelle, [shikashi] by that [jikan] they were completely lost.

The two of them managed to escape across the River Arinelle, but by that time they were completely lost.

6

Then they fell in with a [otoko] who offered to [gaido] them to Caemlyn.

Then they fell in with a man who offered to guide them to Caemlyn.

7

He had said his [namae] was none of their [bijinesu], and he hardly seemed friendly, [shikashi] they needed a [gaido].

He had said his name was none of their business, and he hardly seemed friendly, but they needed a guide.

8

The [saisho] either of them had seen of [ōkami] had been after the [kodomo tachi] of the [hikari] appeared.

The first either of them had seen of wolves had been after the Children of the Light appeared.

9

All they had been trying to do was hide so they would not get eaten by [ōkami] or killed by the [dansei] on [uma].

All they had been trying to do was hide so they would not get eaten by wolves or killed by the men on horses.

10

"...[baai] we’d known you were [kodomo tachi] of the [hikari],"

“...If we’d known you were Children of the Light,”

11

he finished, "we’d have gone to you for [tasukeru]."

he finished, “we’d have gone to you for help.”

12

Byar snorted with [shinjirare nai].

Byar snorted with disbelief.

13

Perrin did not [kaigo] overmuch; [baai] the [omo] [senchō] was convinced, Byar could not [gai] them.

Perrin did not care overmuch; if the Lord Captain was convinced, Byar could not harm them.

14

It was [heiya] that Byar would [teishi] breathing [baai] [omo] [senchō] Bornhald told him to.

It was plain that Byar would stop breathing if Lord Captain Bornhald told him to.

15

"There is no [kanshu] in that,"

“There is no Warder in that,”

16

the [gurē]-haired [otoko] said after a [shunkan].

the gray-haired man said after a moment.

17

Perrin’s [hatsumei] failed him; he knew he should have taken [jikan] to think it out.

Perrin’s invention failed him; he knew he should have taken time to think it out.

18

Egwene leaped into the [ihan].

Egwene leaped into the breach.

19

“We met him in Baerlon.

“We met him in Baerlon.

20

The [toshi] was crowded with [dansei] who had come down from the mine after the [fuyu], and we were put at the same [hyō] in an [in].

The city was crowded with men who had come down from the mines after the winter, and we were put at the same table in an inn.

21

We only talked to him for the [nagasa] of a [shokuji]."

We only talked to him for the length of a meal.”

22

Perrin breathed again.

Perrin breathed again.

23

Thank you, Egwene.

Thank you, Egwene.

24

"Give them back their [mochimono], [ko] Byar.

“Give them back their belongings, Child Byar.

25

Not the [buki], of [mochiron]."

Not the weapons, of course.”

26

When Byar looked at him in [odoroki], Bornhald added, "Or are you one of those who have taken to looting the unenlightened, [ko] Byar?

When Byar looked at him in surprise, Bornhald added, “Or are you one of those who have taken to looting the unenlightened, Child Byar?

27

It is a bad [bijinesu], that, yes?

It is a bad business, that, yes?

28

No [otoko] can be a [dorobō] and [sanpo] in the [hikari]."

No man can be a thief and walk in the Light.”

29

Byar seemed to [kurō shite imasu] with [shinjirare nai] at the [teian].

Byar seemed to struggle with disbelief at the suggestion.

30

“Then you’re letting us go?”

“Then you’re letting us go?”

31

Egwene sounded surprised.

Egwene sounded surprised.

32

Perrin lifted his [atama] to [gyōshi] at the [omo] [senchō].

Perrin lifted his head to stare at the Lord Captain.

33

"Of [mochiron] not, [ko],"

“Of course not, child,”

34

Bornhald said sadly.

Bornhald said sadly.

35

"You may be [uranai] the [shinjitsu] about [kōfuku] from the Two [kawa], since you know about Baerlon, and the mine.

“You may be telling the truth about being from the Two Rivers, since you know about Baerlon, and the mines.

36

[shikashi] Shadar Logoth...?

But Shadar Logoth...?

37

That is a [namae] [hijō ni], [hijō ni] few know, most of them [Kurai-yūjin], and anyone who knows enough to know the [namae], knows enough not to go there.

That is a name very, very few know, most of them Darkfriends, and anyone who knows enough to know the name, knows enough not to go there.

38

I suggest you think of a [yori yoi] [monogatari] on the [tabi] to Amador.

I suggest you think of a better story on the journey to Amador.

39

You will have [jikan], since we must [ichiji teishi] in Caemlyn.

You will have time, since we must pause in Caemlyn.

40

Preferably the [shinjitsu], [ko].

Preferably the truth, child.

41

There is [jiyū] in [shinjitsu] and the [hikari]."

There is freedom in truth and the Light.”

42

Byar forgot some of his [enryo] toward the [gurē]-haired [otoko].

Byar forgot some of his diffidence toward the gray-haired man.

43

He spun from the [shūjin], and there was an outraged snap to his [kotoba].

He spun from the prisoners, and there was an outraged snap to his words.

44

“You can’t!

“You can’t!

45

It is not allowed!”

It is not allowed!”

46

Bornhald raised one [mayu] quizzically, and Byar pulled himself up short, swallowing.

Bornhald raised one eyebrow quizzically, and Byar pulled himself up short, swallowing.

47

"Forgive me, my [omo] [senchō].

“Forgive me, my Lord Captain.

48

I forgot myself, and I humbly beg [onsha] and submit myself for [kugyō], [shikashi] as my [omo] [senchō] himself has pointed out, we must [rīchi] Caemlyn in [jikan], and with most of our [sai maunto] gone, we will be hard pressed enough without carrying [shūjin] along."

I forgot myself, and I humbly beg pardon and submit myself for penance, but as my Lord Captain himself has pointed out, we must reach Caemlyn in time, and with most of our remounts gone, we will be hard pressed enough without carrying prisoners along.”

49

“And what would you suggest?”

“And what would you suggest?”

50

Bornhald asked calmly.

Bornhald asked calmly.

51

"The [penaruti] for [Kurai-yūjin] is [shi]."

“The penalty for Darkfriends is death.”

52

The [furatto] [koe] made it all the more jarring.

The flat voice made it all the more jarring.

53

He might have been suggesting stepping on a [bagu].

He might have been suggesting stepping on a bug.

54

"There is no [kyūsen] with the [kage].

“There is no truce with the Shadow.

55

There is no [jihi] for [Kurai-yūjin]."

There is no mercy for Darkfriends.”

56

"[netsui] is to be applauded, [ko] Byar, [shikashi], as I must often tell my [musuko], Dain, [nesshin sugiru koto] can be a grievous [koshō].

“Zeal is to be applauded, Child Byar, but, as I must often tell my son, Dain, overzealousness can be a grievous fault.

57

Remember that the [kyōgi] also say, ’No [otoko] is so lost that he cannot be brought to the [hikari].’ These two are young.

Remember that the Tenets also say, ’No man is so lost that he cannot be brought to the Light.’ These two are young.

58

They cannot yet be [fukai] in the [kage].

They cannot yet be deep in the Shadow.

59

They can yet be led to the [hikari], [baai] they will only allow the [kage] to be lifted from their [me].

They can yet be led to the Light, if they will only allow the Shadow to be lifted from their eyes.

60

We must give them that [kikai]."

We must give them that chance.”

61

For a [shunkan] Perrin almost [kanjita] [aijō] for the grandfatherly [otoko] who stood between them and Byar.

For a moment Perrin almost felt affection for the grandfatherly man who stood between them and Byar.

62

Then Bornhald turned his [sofu]’s [egao] on Egwene.

Then Bornhald turned his grandfather’s smile on Egwene.

63

"[baai] you [kyohi shimasu] to come to the [hikari] by the [jikan] we [rīchi] Amador, I will be forced to [tān] you over to the [shitsumonsha], and beside them Byar’s [netsui] is [shikashi] a [kyandoru] beside the [nichi]."

“If you refuse to come to the Light by the time we reach Amador, I will be forced to turn you over to the Questioners, and beside them Byar’s zeal is but a candle beside the sun.”

64

The [gurē]-haired [otoko] sounded like a [otoko] who regretted what he must do, [shikashi] who had no [ito] of ever doing anything [shikashi] his [gimu] as he [mimashita] it.

The gray-haired man sounded like a man who regretted what he must do, but who had no intention of ever doing anything but his duty as he saw it.

65

"Repent, renounce the [Kurai] One, come to the [hikari], confess your [tsumi] and tell what you know of this [hiretsusa] with [ōkami], and you will be spared that.

“Repent, renounce the Dark One, come to the Light, confess your sins and tell what you know of this vileness with wolves, and you will be spared that.

66

You will [sanpo] [muryō desu], in the [hikari]."

You will walk free, in the Light.”

67

His [shisen] centered on Perrin, and he sighed sadly.

His gaze centered on Perrin, and he sighed sadly.

68

[kōri] filled Perrin’s [sebone].

Ice filled Perrin’s spine.

69

"[shikashi] you, just Perrin from the Two [kawa].

“But you, just Perrin from the Two Rivers.

70

You killed two of the [kodomo tachi]."

You killed two of the Children.”

71

He touched the [ono] that Byar still held.

He touched the axe that Byar still held.

72

"For you, I [kyōfu], a [kōshu dai] waits in Amador."

“For you, I fear, a gibbet waits in Amador.”

73

[akira] 31

Chapter 31

74

[geki] for Your [yūshoku]

Play for Your Supper

75

Rand narrowed his [me], watching the [bōjin o] that [jōshō shita] ahead, three or four bends of the [dōro] away.

Rand narrowed his eyes, watching the dust-tail that rose ahead, three or four bends of the road away.

76

Mat was already headed toward the wild [ikegaki] alongside the [dōro].

Mat was already headed toward the wild hedgerow alongside the roadway.

77

Its [ebāgurīn] leaves and densely intermeshed [eda] would hide them as [yoku] as a [ishi] [kabe], [baai] they could find a [michi] through to the [sonota] [saido].

Its evergreen leaves and densely intermeshed branches would hide them as well as a stone wall, if they could find a way through to the other side.

78

The [sonota] [saido] of the [dōro] was marked by the sparse [chairo] [sukeruton] of [atama]-high [busshu], and beyond was an [ōpun] [ryōiki] for [hanbun] a [mairu] to the [hayashi].

The other side of the road was marked by the sparse brown skeletons of head-high bushes, and beyond was an open field for half a mile to the woods.

79

It might have been [ichibu] of a [nōjō] not too long abandoned, [shikashi] it offered no quick hiding [basho].

It might have been part of a farm not too long abandoned, but it offered no quick hiding place.

80

He tried to [saibankan] the [supīdo] of the [bōjin o], and the [kaze].

He tried to judge the speed of the dust-tail, and the wind.

81

A sudden [toppū] swirled [dōro] [hokori] up around him, obscuring everything.

A sudden gust swirled road dust up around him, obscuring everything.

82

He blinked and adjusted the [heiya], [kurai] [sukāfu] across his [hana] and [kuchi no naka].

He blinked and adjusted the plain, dark scarf across his nose and mouth.

83

None too clean now, it made his [kao] itch, [shikashi] it kept him from inhaling [hokori] with every [iki].

None too clean now, it made his face itch, but it kept him from inhaling dust with every breath.

84

A [nōka] had given it to him, a long-faced [otoko] with [mizo] in his [hō] from [shinpai].

A farmer had given it to him, a long-faced man with grooves in his cheeks from worry.

85

“I don’t know what you’re running from,”

“I don’t know what you’re running from,”

86

he had said with an anxious [shikame men], "and I don’t want to.

he had said with an anxious frown, “and I don’t want to.

87

You understand?

You understand?

88

My [kazoku]."

My family.”

89

Abruptly the [nōka] had [hotta] two long scarves out of his [kōto] [poketto] and pushed the [motsure] of [wuru] at them.

Abruptly the farmer had dug two long scarves out of his coat pocket and pushed the tangle of wool at them.

90

"It’s not much, [shikashi] here.

“It’s not much, but here.

91

[zokushite imasu] to my [otokonoko].

Belong to my boys.

92

They have [tanin].

They have others.

93

You don’t know me, understand?

You don’t know me, understand?

94

It’s hard [kai]."

It’s hard times.”

95

Rand treasured the [sukāfu].

Rand treasured the scarf.

96

The [risuto] of [shinsetsu] he had made in his [kokoro] in the [hi] since Whitebridge was a short one, and he did not [shinjiru] it would get much longer.

The list of kindnesses he had made in his mind in the days since Whitebridge was a short one, and he did not believe it would get much longer.

97

Mat, all [shikashi] his [me] hidden by the [sukāfu] wrapped around his [atama], hunted swiftly along the tall [ikegaki], pulling at the leafy [eda].

Mat, all but his eyes hidden by the scarf wrapped around his head, hunted swiftly along the tall hedgerow, pulling at the leafy branches.

98

Rand touched the [heron]-marked [moyō] at his [beruto], [shikashi] let his [te] [aki] away.

Rand touched the heron-marked hilt at his belt, but let his hand fall away.

99

Once already, cutting a [ana] through a [hejji] had almost given them away.

Once already, cutting a hole through a hedge had almost given them away.

100

The [bōjin o] was moving toward them, and staying together too long.

The dust-tail was moving toward them, and staying together too long.

101

Not the [kaze].

Not the wind.

102

At least it was not raining.

At least it was not raining.

103

[ame] settled the [hokori].

Rain settled the dust.

104

No [mondai] how hard it fell, it never turned the hard-packed [dōro] to [doro], [shikashi] when it rained there was no [hokori].

No matter how hard it fell, it never turned the hard-packed road to mud, but when it rained there was no dust.

105

[hokori] was the only warning they had before whoever it was came [tojiru] enough to hear.

Dust was the only warning they had before whoever it was came close enough to hear.

106

Sometimes that was too late.

Sometimes that was too late.

107

“Here,”

“Here,”

108

Mat called softly.

Mat called softly.

109

He seemed to [suteppu] [migi] through the [hejji].

He seemed to step right through the hedge.

110

Rand hurried to the [supotto].

Rand hurried to the spot.

111

[dare-ka] had cut a [ana] there, once.

Someone had cut a hole there, once.

112

It was partly [zōshoku saseta] over, and from three [ashi] away it looked as [kotai] as the [nokori], [shikashi] [tojiru] up there was only a thin [gamen] of [eda].

It was partly grown over, and from three feet away it looked as solid as the rest, but close up there was only a thin screen of branches.

113

As he pushed through, he heard [uma] coming.

As he pushed through, he heard horses coming.

114

Not the [kaze].

Not the wind.

115

He crouched behind the barely covered [ōpuningu], clutching the [moyō] of his [ken] as the [kishu] rode by.

He crouched behind the barely covered opening, clutching the hilt of his sword as the horsemen rode by.

116

Five...

Five...

117

six...

six...

118

seven of them.

seven of them.

119

Plainly dressed [dansei], [shikashi] [ken] and [yari] said they were not [murabito].

Plainly dressed men, but swords and spears said they were not villagers.

120

Some wore [kawa] [chunikku] with [kinzoku] [sutaddo], and two had round [hagane] [kyappu].

Some wore leather tunics with metal studs, and two had round steel caps.

121

[shōnin][keibi], perhaps, between hirings.

Merchants’ guards, perhaps, between hirings.

122

Perhaps.

Perhaps.

123

One of them casually swung his [me] toward the [hejji] as he went by the [ōpuningu], and Rand bared an [inchi] of his [ken].

One of them casually swung his eyes toward the hedge as he went by the opening, and Rand bared an inch of his sword.

124

Mat snarled silently like a cornered [anaguma], squinting above his [sukāfu].

Mat snarled silently like a cornered badger, squinting above his scarf.

125

His [te] was under his [kōto]; he always clutched the [dagā] from Shadar Logoth when there was [kiken].

His hand was under his coat; he always clutched the dagger from Shadar Logoth when there was danger.

126

Rand was no longer sure [baai] it was to protect himself or to protect the [rubī]-hilted [dagā].

Rand was no longer sure if it was to protect himself or to protect the ruby-hilted dagger.

127

Of late Mat seemed to forget he had a [bou], sometimes.

Of late Mat seemed to forget he had a bow, sometimes.

128

The [raidā] passed at a [osoi] [kobashiri], going somewhere with a [mokuteki] [shikashi] not too great a [sokkō].

The riders passed at a slow trot, going somewhere with a purpose but not too great a haste.

129

[hokori] sifted through the [hejji].

Dust sifted through the hedge.

130

Rand waited until the clop of the hooves faded before he stuck his [atama] cautiously back through the [ana].

Rand waited until the clop of the hooves faded before he stuck his head cautiously back through the hole.

131

The [bōjin o] was [yoku] down the [dōro], going the [michi] they had come.

The dust-tail was well down the road, going the way they had come.

132

Eastward the [sora] was clear.

Eastward the sky was clear.

133

He climbed out onto the [dōro], watching the [koramu] of [hokori] [ugokasu] [nishi].

He climbed out onto the roadway, watching the column of dust move west.

134

“Not after us,”

“Not after us,”

135

he said, halfway between a [seimei] and a [shitsumon].

he said, halfway between a statement and a question.

136

Mat scrambled out after him, looking warily in both [hōkō].

Mat scrambled out after him, looking warily in both directions.

137

“Maybe,”

“Maybe,”

138

he said.

he said.

139

“Maybe.”

“Maybe.”

140

Rand had no [kangae] which [michi] he meant it, [shikashi] he nodded.

Rand had no idea which way he meant it, but he nodded.

141

Maybe.

Maybe.

142

It had not begun like this, their [tabi] down the Caemlyn [dōro].

It had not begun like this, their journey down the Caemlyn Road.

143

For a long [jikan] after leaving Whitebridge, Rand would suddenly find himself staring back down the [dōro] behind them.

For a long time after leaving Whitebridge, Rand would suddenly find himself staring back down the road behind them.

144

Sometimes he would see [dare-ka] who made his [iki] [kyacchi], a tall, skinny [otoko] hurrying up the [dōro], or a lanky, [shiroi]-haired [nakama] up beside the [doraibā] on a [wagon], [shikashi] it was always a [pakku - gyōshō jin], or [nōka] [tsukuri] their [michi] to [shijō], never Thom Merrilin.

Sometimes he would see someone who made his breath catch, a tall, skinny man hurrying up the road, or a lanky, white-haired fellow up beside the driver on a wagon, but it was always a pack-peddler, or farmers making their way to market, never Thom Merrilin.

145

[kibō] faded as the [hi] passed.

Hope faded as the days passed.

146

There was considerable [torafikku] on the [dōro], [wagon] and [kāto], [hitobito] on [uma] and [hitobito] afoot.

There was considerable traffic on the road, wagons and carts, people on horses and people afoot.

147

They came singly and in [gurūpu], a [densha] of [shōnin][wagon] or a dozen [kishu] together.

They came singly and in groups, a train of merchants’ wagons or a dozen horsemen together.

148

They did not [jamu] the [dōro], and often there was nothing in [kōkei] except the all [shikashi] leafless [kigi] lining the hard-packed roadbed, [shikashi] there were certainly more [hitobito] traveling than Rand had ever seen in the Two [kawa].

They did not jam the road, and often there was nothing in sight except the all but leafless trees lining the hard-packed roadbed, but there were certainly more people traveling than Rand had ever seen in the Two Rivers.

149

Most traveled in the same [hōkō] that they did, eastward toward Caemlyn.

Most traveled in the same direction that they did, eastward toward Caemlyn.

150

Sometimes they got a [noru] in a [nōka]’s [wagon] for a little [kyori], a [mairu], or five, [shikashi] more often they walked.

Sometimes they got a ride in a farmer’s wagon for a little distance, a mile, or five, but more often they walked.

151

[dansei] on [jōba] they avoided; when they spotted even one [raidā] in the [kyori] they scrambled off the [dōro] and hid until he was past.

Men on horseback they avoided; when they spotted even one rider in the distance they scrambled off the road and hid until he was past.

152

None ever wore a [kuro] [gaitō], and Rand did not really think a Fade would let them see him coming, [shikashi] there was no [pointo] in taking [kikai].

None ever wore a black cloak, and Rand did not really think a Fade would let them see him coming, but there was no point in taking chances.

153

In the [hajime] it was just the Halfmen they feared.

In the beginning it was just the Halfmen they feared.

154

The [saisho] [mura] after Whitebridge looked so much like Emond’s [ryōiki] that Rand’s [suteppu] dragged when he [mimashita] it.

The first village after Whitebridge looked so much like Emond’s Field that Rand’s steps dragged when he saw it.

155

Thatched [yane] with high [chōten], and goodwives in their [epuron] gossiping over the [fensu] between their [hausu], and [kodomo tachi] playing on a [mura] [midori].

Thatched roofs with high peaks, and goodwives in their aprons gossiping over the fences between their houses, and children playing on a village green.

156

The [josei]’s [kami] hung unbraided around their [kata], and [sonota] small [monogoto] were different, too, [shikashi] the whole together was like home.

The women’s hair hung unbraided around their shoulders, and other small things were different, too, but the whole together was like home.

157

[ushi] cropped on the [midori], and [gachō] waddled [jiko]-importantly across the [dōro].

Cows cropped on the green, and geese waddled self-importantly across the road.

158

The [kodomo tachi] tumbled, laughing, in the [hokori] where the [kusa] was gone altogether.

The children tumbled, laughing, in the dust where the grass was gone altogether.

159

They did not even [hyōjō] around when Rand and Mat went by.

They did not even look around when Rand and Mat went by.

160

That was another [koto] that was different.

That was another thing that was different.

161

[gaijin] were no [fūgawari] there; two more did not [dorō] so much as a [ni] [ichimoku].

Strangers were no oddity there; two more did not draw so much as a second glance.

162

[mura] [inu] only raised their [heddo] to [sunifu] as he and Mat passed; none stirred themselves.

Village dogs only raised their heads to sniff as he and Mat passed; none stirred themselves.

163

It was coming on [yūgata] as they went through the [mura], and he [kanjita] a [pan] of [hōmushikku] as [tentō shimasu] appeared in the windows.

It was coming on evening as they went through the village, and he felt a pang of homesickness as lights appeared in the windows.

164

No [mondai] what it [rukkusu] like, a small [koe] whispered in his [kokoro], it isn’t really home.

No matter what it looks like, a small voice whispered in his mind, it isn’t really home.

165

Even [baai] you go into one of those [hausu] Tam won’t be there.

Even if you go into one of those houses Tam won’t be there.

166

[baai] he was, could you [hyōjō] him in the [kao]?

If he was, could you look him in the face?

167

You know, now, don’t you?

You know, now, don’t you?

168

Except for little [monogoto] like where you come from and who you are.

Except for little things like where you come from and who you are.

169

No [fībā - yume].

No fever-dreams.

170

He hunched his [kata] against taunting [warai] [uchigawa] his [atama].

He hunched his shoulders against taunting laughter inside his head.

171

You might as [yoku] [teishi], the [koe] snickered.

You might as well stop, the voice snickered.

172

One [basho] it as [yoi] as another when you aren’t from anywhere, and the [Kurai] One has you marked.

One place it as good as another when you aren’t from anywhere, and the Dark One has you marked.

173

Mat tugged at his [surību], [shikashi] he pulled loose and stared at the [hausu].

Mat tugged at his sleeve, but he pulled loose and stared at the houses.

174

He did not want to [teishi], [shikashi] he did want to [hyōjō] and remember.

He did not want to stop, but he did want to look and remember.

175

So much like home, [shikashi] you’ll never see that again, will you?

So much like home, but you’ll never see that again, will you?

176

Mat yanked at him again.

Mat yanked at him again.

177

His [kao] was [pin to hatta], the [hada] around his [kuchi no naka] and [me] [shiroi].

His face was taut, the skin around his mouth and eyes white.

178

“Come on,”

“Come on,”

179

Mat muttered.

Mat muttered.

180

“Come on.”

“Come on.”

181

He looked at the [mura] as [baai] he suspected something of hiding there.

He looked at the village as if he suspected something of hiding there.

182

“Come on.

“Come on.

183

We can’t [teishi] yet."

We can’t stop yet.”

184

Rand turned in a complete [sākuru], taking in the whole [mura], and sighed.

Rand turned in a complete circle, taking in the whole village, and sighed.

185

They were not [hijō ni] far from Whitebridge.

They were not very far from Whitebridge.

186

[baai] the Myrddraal could get past Whitebridge’s [kabe] without [kōfuku] seen, it would have no [meiwaku] at all searching this small [mura].

If the Myrddraal could get past Whitebridge’s wall without being seen, it would have no trouble at all searching this small village.

187

He let himself be drawn on into the [inaka] beyond, until the [ka yabuki]-roofed [hausu] were left behind.

He let himself be drawn on into the countryside beyond, until the thatch-roofed houses were left behind.

188

[yoru, kishi_knt] fell before they found a [supotto] by [gekkō], under some [busshu] still bearing their [shin da] leaves.

Night fell before they found a spot by moonlight, under some bushes still bearing their dead leaves.

189

They filled their [hara] with [samui] [mizu] from a shallow [ogawa] not far away and curled up on the [gurando], wrapped in their [gaitō], without a [kasai].

They filled their bellies with cold water from a shallow rivulet not far away and curled up on the ground, wrapped in their cloaks, without a fire.

190

A [kasai] could be seen; [yori yoi] to be [samui].

A fire could be seen; better to be cold.

191

Uneasy with his [omoide], Rand woke often, and every [jikan] he could hear Mat muttering and tossing in his [suimin].

Uneasy with his memories, Rand woke often, and every time he could hear Mat muttering and tossing in his sleep.

192

He did not [yume], that he could remember, [shikashi] he did not [suimin] [yoku].

He did not dream, that he could remember, but he did not sleep well.

193

You’ll never see home again.

You’ll never see home again.

194

That was not the only [yoru, kishi_knt] they spent with just their [gaitō] to protect them from the [kaze], and sometimes the [ame], [samui] and soaking.

That was not the only night they spent with just their cloaks to protect them from the wind, and sometimes the rain, cold and soaking.

195

It was not the only [shokuji] they made from nothing [shikashi] [samui] [mizu].

It was not the only meal they made from nothing but cold water.

196

Between them they had enough [koin] for a few [shokuji] at an [in], [shikashi] a [shindai] for the [yoru, kishi_knt] would take too much.

Between them they had enough coins for a few meals at an inn, but a bed for the night would take too much.

197

[monogoto] [kosuto] more [soto ni] the Two [kawa], more this [saido] of the Arinelle than in Baerlon.

Things cost more outside the Two Rivers, more this side of the Arinelle than in Baerlon.

198

What [okane] they had left had to be saved for an [kinkyū jitai].

What money they had left had to be saved for an emergency.

199

One [gogo] Rand mentioned the [dagā] with the [rubī] in its [moyō], [dōjini, tsutsu, issun] they were trudging down the [dōro] with [hara] too empty to rumble, and the [nichi] [hikui] and weak, and nothing in [iken] for the coming [yoru, kishi_knt] [shikashi] more [busshu].

One afternoon Rand mentioned the dagger with the ruby in its hilt, while they were trudging down the road with bellies too empty to rumble, and the sun low and weak, and nothing in view for the coming night but more bushes.

200

[Kurai] [kumo] built up overhead for [ame] during the [yoru, kishi_knt].

Dark clouds built up overhead for rain during the night.

201

He hoped they were lucky; maybe no more than an icy [kirisame].

He hoped they were lucky; maybe no more than an icy drizzle.

202

He went on a few [suteppu] before he realized that Mat had stopped.

He went on a few steps before he realized that Mat had stopped.

203

He stopped, too, wriggling his [tsumasaki] in his [būtsu].

He stopped, too, wriggling his toes in his boots.

204

At least his [ashi] [kanjita] [atatakai].

At least his feet felt warm.

205

He eased the [suto rappu] across his [kata].

He eased the straps across his shoulders.

206

His [mōfu] [rōru] and Thom’s bundled [gaitō] were not heavy, [shikashi] even a few [pondo] weighed heavy after [mairu] on an empty [i].

His blanket roll and Thom’s bundled cloak were not heavy, but even a few pounds weighed heavy after miles on an empty stomach.

207

"What’s the [mondai], Mat?"

“What’s the matter, Mat?”

208

he said.

he said.

209

“Why are you so anxious to sell it?”

“Why are you so anxious to sell it?”

210

Mat demanded angrily.

Mat demanded angrily.

211

“I found it, after all.

“I found it, after all.

212

You ever think I might like to [kīpu] it?

You ever think I might like to keep it?

213

For a [dōjini, tsutsu, issun], anyway.

For a while, anyway.

214

[baai] you want to sell something, sell that bloody [ken]!"

If you want to sell something, sell that bloody sword!”

215

Rand rubbed his [te] along the [heron]-marked [moyō].

Rand rubbed his hand along the heron-marked hilt.

216

"My [chichioya] gave this [ken] to me.

“My father gave this sword to me.

217

It was his.

It was his.

218

I wouldn’t ask you to sell something your [chichioya] gave you.

I wouldn’t ask you to sell something your father gave you.

219

[chi] and [hai], Mat, do you like going hungry?

Blood and ashes, Mat, do you like going hungry?

220

Anyway, even [baai] I could find somebody to buy it, how much would a [ken] bring?

Anyway, even if I could find somebody to buy it, how much would a sword bring?

221

What would a [nōka] want with a [ken]?

What would a farmer want with a sword?

222

That [rubī] would fetch enough to take us all the [michi] to Caemlyn in a [kyarijji].

That ruby would fetch enough to take us all the way to Caemlyn in a carriage.

223

Maybe all the [michi] to [tāru] Valon.

Maybe all the way to Tar Valon.

224

And we’d eat every [shokuji] in an [in], and [suimin] every [yoru, kishi_knt] in a [shindai].

And we’d eat every meal in an inn, and sleep every night in a bed.

225

Maybe you like the [kangae] of walking halfway across the [sekai] and sleeping on the [gurando]?"

Maybe you like the idea of walking halfway across the world and sleeping on the ground?”

226

He glared at Mat, and his [yūjin] glared back.

He glared at Mat, and his friend glared back.

227

They stood like that in the [mannaka] of the [dōro] until Mat suddenly gave an uncomfortable [kata o sukumeru], and dropped his [me] to the [dōro].

They stood like that in the middle of the road until Mat suddenly gave an uncomfortable shrug, and dropped his eyes to the road.

228

“Who would I sell it to, Rand?

“Who would I sell it to, Rand?

229

A [nōka] would have to [yūryō] in [niwatori]; we couldn’t buy a [kyarijji] with [niwatori].

A farmer would have to pay in chickens; we couldn’t buy a carriage with chickens.

230

And [baai] I even showed it in any [mura] we’ve been through, they’d probably think we [nusun da] it.

And if I even showed it in any village we’ve been through, they’d probably think we stole it.

231

The [hikari] knows what would happen then."

The Light knows what would happen then.”

232

After a [bun] Rand nodded reluctantly.

After a minute Rand nodded reluctantly.

233

"You’re [migi].

“You’re right.

234

I know it.

I know it.

235

I’m sorry; I didn’t mean to snap at you.

I’m sorry; I didn’t mean to snap at you.

236

It’s only that I’m hungry and my [ashi] [kizutsuketa]."

It’s only that I’m hungry and my feet hurt.”

237

“mine, too.”

“Mine, too.”

238

They started down the [dōro] again, walking even more wearily than before.

They started down the road again, walking even more wearily than before.

239

The [kaze] gusted up, blowing [hokori] in their [kao].

The wind gusted up, blowing dust in their faces.

240

“mine, too.”

“Mine, too.”

241

Mat coughed.

Mat coughed.

242

[nōjō] did provide some [shokuji] and a few [yoru] out of the [samui].

Farms did provide some meals and a few nights out of the cold.

243

A [hoshikusa no yama] was nearly as [atatakai] as a [heya] with a [kasai], at least compared to lying under the [busshu], and a [hoshikusa no yama], even one without a tarp over it, kept all [shikashi] the heaviest [ame] off, [baai] you [hotta] yourself in deeply enough.

A haystack was nearly as warm as a room with a fire, at least compared to lying under the bushes, and a haystack, even one without a tarp over it, kept all but the heaviest rain off, if you dug yourself in deeply enough.

244

Sometimes Mat tried his [te] at stealing [tamago], and once he attempted to [gyūnyū] a [ushi] left unattended, staked out on a long [rōpu] to [sakumotsu] in a [ryōiki].

Sometimes Mat tried his hand at stealing eggs, and once he attempted to milk a cow left unattended, staked out on a long rope to crop in a field.

245

Most [nōjō] had [inu], though, and [nōjō] [inu] were watchful.

Most farms had dogs, though, and farm dogs were watchful.

246

A two-[mairu] [jikkō] with baying [ryōken] at their [kakato] was too high a [kakaku] for two or three [tamago] as Rand [mimashita] it, especially when the [inu] sometimes took [jikan] to go away and let them down out of the [tsurī] where they had taken [hinan sho].

A two-mile run with baying hounds at their heels was too high a price for two or three eggs as Rand saw it, especially when the dogs sometimes took hours to go away and let them down out of the tree where they had taken shelter.

247

The [jikan] were what he regretted.

The hours were what he regretted.

248

He did not really like doing it, [shikashi] Rand preferred to [apurōchi] a [nōka] openly in broad [natsujikan].

He did not really like doing it, but Rand preferred to approach a farmhouse openly in broad daylight.

249

Now and again they had the [inu] set on them anyway, without a [kotoba] [kōfuku] said, for the [uwasa] and the [kai] made everyone who lived apart from [sonota] [hitobito] nervous about [gaijin], [shikashi] often an [jikan] or so chopping [mokuzai] or hauling [mizu] would earn a [shokuji] and a [shindai], even [baai] the [shindai] was a [yama] of [wara] in the [naya].

Now and again they had the dogs set on them anyway, without a word being said, for the rumors and the times made everyone who lived apart from other people nervous about strangers, but often an hour or so chopping wood or hauling water would earn a meal and a bed, even if the bed was a pile of straw in the barn.

250

[shikashi] an [jikan] or two doing [zatsuyō] was an [jikan] or two of [natsujikan] when they were standing still, an [jikan] or two for the Myrddraal to [kyacchi] up.

But an hour or two doing chores was an hour or two of daylight when they were standing still, an hour or two for the Myrddraal to catch up.

251

Sometimes he wondered how many [mairu] a Fade could [kabā] in an [jikan].

Sometimes he wondered how many miles a Fade could cover in an hour.

252

He begrudged every [bun] of it – though admittedly not so much when he was wolfing down a goodwife’s [atsui] [sūpu].

He begrudged every minute of it – though admittedly not so much when he was wolfing down a goodwife’s hot soup.

253

And when they had no [tabemono], knowing they had spent every possible [bun] moving toward Caemlyn did not do much to soothe an empty [hara].

And when they had no food, knowing they had spent every possible minute moving toward Caemlyn did not do much to soothe an empty belly.

254

Rand could not make up his [kokoro] [baai] it was worse to lose [jikan] or go hungry, [shikashi] Mat went beyond worrying about his [hara] or [tsuikyū].

Rand could not make up his mind if it was worse to lose time or go hungry, but Mat went beyond worrying about his belly or pursuit.

255

“What do we know about them, anyway?”

“What do we know about them, anyway?”

256

Mat demanded one [gogo] [dōjini, tsutsu, issun] they were mucking out [yatai] on a small [nōjō].

Mat demanded one afternoon while they were mucking out stalls on a small farm.

257

"[hikari], Mat, what do they know about us?"

“Light, Mat, what do they know about us?”

258

Rand sneezed.

Rand sneezed.

259

They were working stripped to the [koshi], and [ase] and [wara] covered them both liberally, and [mōto] of [wara dasuto] hung in the [kūki].

They were working stripped to the waist, and sweat and straw covered them both liberally, and motes of straw-dust hung in the air.

260

"What I know is they’ll give us some [rōsuto] [kohitsuji] and a real [shindai] to [suimin] in."

“What I know is they’ll give us some roast lamb and a real bed to sleep in.”

261

Mat [hotta] his [hoshikusa yō kumade] into the [wara] and [hiryō] and gave a sidelong [shikame men] at the [nōka], coming from the [rimen] of the [naya] with a [baketsu] in one [te] and his milking [sutsūru] in the [sonota].

Mat dug his hayfork into the straw and manure and gave a sidelong frown at the farmer, coming from the back of the barn with a bucket in one hand and his milking stool in the other.

262

A stooped old [otoko] with [hada] like [kawa] and thin, [gurē] [kami], the [nōka] slowed when he [mimashita] Mat looking at him, then looked away quickly and hurried on out of the [naya], slopping [gyūnyū] over the [rimu] of the [baketsu] in his [sokkō].

A stooped old man with skin like leather and thin, gray hair, the farmer slowed when he saw Mat looking at him, then looked away quickly and hurried on out of the barn, slopping milk over the rim of the bucket in his haste.

263

“He’s up to something, I tell you,”

“He’s up to something, I tell you,”

264

Mat said.

Mat said.

265

"See the [michi] he wouldn’t meet my [me]?

“See the way he wouldn’t meet my eye?

266

Why are they so friendly to a [kappuru] of [wandarāzu] they never laid [me] on before?

Why are they so friendly to a couple of wanderers they never laid eyes on before?

267

Tell me that.”

Tell me that.”

268

"His [tsuma] says we remind her of their [mago].

“His wife says we remind her of their grandsons.

269

will you [teishi] worrying about them?

Will you stop worrying about them?

270

What we have to [shinpai] about is behind us.

What we have to worry about is behind us.

271

I [kibō]."

I hope.”

272

“He’s up to something,”

“He’s up to something,”

273

Mat muttered.

Mat muttered.

274

When they finished, they washed up at the [torafu] in [furonto] of the [naya], their [kage] stretching long with the sinking [nichi].

When they finished, they washed up at the trough in front of the barn, their shadows stretching long with the sinking sun.

275

Rand toweled off with his [shatsu] as they walked to the [nōka].

Rand toweled off with his shirt as they walked to the farmhouse.

276

The [nōka] met them at the [tobira]; he leaned on a [kwōtā] in a too-casual [yarikata].

The farmer met them at the door; he leaned on a quarterstaff in a too-casual manner.

277

Behind him his [tsuma] clutched her [epuron] and peered past his [kata], chewing her [rippu].

Behind him his wife clutched her apron and peered past his shoulder, chewing her lip.

278

Rand sighed; he did not think he and Mat reminded them of their [mago] any longer.

Rand sighed; he did not think he and Mat reminded them of their grandsons any longer.

279

"Our [musuko] are coming to [hōmon] tonight,"

“Our sons are coming to visit tonight,”

280

the old [otoko] said.

the old man said.

281

“All four of them.

“All four of them.

282

I forgot.

I forgot.

283

They’re all four coming.

They’re all four coming.

284

Big [wakamono].

Big lads.

285

Strong.

Strong.

286

Be here any [jikan], now.

Be here any time, now.

287

I’m afraid we don’t have the [shindai] we promised you."

I’m afraid we don’t have the bed we promised you.”

288

His [tsuma] [suiryoku] a small [bandoru] wrapped in a [napukin] past him.

His wife thrust a small bundle wrapped in a napkin past him.

289

“Here.

“Here.

290

It’s [pan], and [chīzu], and [pikurusu], and [kohitsuji].

It’s bread, and cheese, and pickles, and lamb.

291

Enough for two [shokuji], maybe.

Enough for two meals, maybe.

292

Here.”

Here.”

293

Her wrinkled [kao] asked them to please take it and go.

Her wrinkled face asked them to please take it and go.

294

Rand took the [bandoru].

Rand took the bundle.

295

“Thank you.

“Thank you.

296

I understand.

I understand.

297

Come on, Mat.”

Come on, Mat.”

298

Mat followed him, grumbling [dōjini, tsutsu, issun] he pulled his [shatsu] over his [atama].

Mat followed him, grumbling while he pulled his shirt over his head.

299

Rand [shikō] it best to [kabā] as many [mairu] as they could before stopping to eat.

Rand thought it best to cover as many miles as they could before stopping to eat.

300

The old [nōka] had a [inu].

The old farmer had a dog.

301

It could have been worse, he [shikō].

It could have been worse, he thought.

302

Three [hi] earlier, [dōjini, tsutsu, issun] they were still working, they’d had the [inu] set on them.

Three days earlier, while they were still working, they’d had the dogs set on them.

303

The [inu], and the [nōka], and his two [musuko] waving cudgels chased them out to the Caemlyn [dōro] and [hanbun] a [mairu] down it before giving up.

The dogs, and the farmer, and his two sons waving cudgels chased them out to the Caemlyn Road and half a mile down it before giving up.

304

They had barely had [jikan] to [sunacchi] up their [mochimono] and [jikkō].

They had barely had time to snatch up their belongings and run.

305

The [nōka] had carried a [bou] with a [hiroi heddo] [yajirushi] nocked.

The farmer had carried a bow with a broad-head arrow nocked.

306

“don’t come back, hear!”

“Don’t come back, hear!”

307

he had shouted after them.

he had shouted after them.

308

"I don’t know what you’re up to, [shikashi] don’t let me see your shifty [me] again!"

“I don’t know what you’re up to, but don’t let me see your shifty eyes again!”

309

Mat had started to [tān] back, [bukiyō] at his [yazutsu], [shikashi] Rand pulled him on.

Mat had started to turn back, fumbling at his quiver, but Rand pulled him on.

310

“Are you crazy?”

“Are you crazy?”

311

Mat gave him a sullen [hyōjō], [shikashi] at least he kept running.

Mat gave him a sullen look, but at least he kept running.

312

Rand sometimes wondered [baai] it was worthwhile stopping at [nōjō].

Rand sometimes wondered if it was worthwhile stopping at farms.

313

The further they went, the more suspicious of [gaijin] Mat became, and the less he was able to hide it.

The further they went, the more suspicious of strangers Mat became, and the less he was able to hide it.

314

Or bothered to.

Or bothered to.

315

The [shokuji] got skimpier for the same [shigoto], and sometimes not even the [naya] was offered as a [basho] to [suimin].

The meals got skimpier for the same work, and sometimes not even the barn was offered as a place to sleep.

316

[shikashi] then a [soryūshon] to all their [mondai] came to Rand, or so it seemed, and it came at Grinwell’s [nōjō].

But then a solution to all their problems came to Rand, or so it seemed, and it came at Grinwell’s farm.

317

[shujin] Grinwell and his [tsuma] had nine [kodomo tachi], the eldest a [musume] not more than a [toshi] younger than Rand and Mat.

Master Grinwell and his wife had nine children, the eldest a daughter not more than a year younger than Rand and Mat.

318

[shujin] Grinwell was a sturdy [otoko], and with his [kodomo tachi] he probably had no must of any more [tasukeru], [shikashi] he looked them up and down, taking in their [ryokō]-stained [fuku] and dusty [būtsu], and allowed as how he could always find [shigoto] for more [te].

Master Grinwell was a sturdy man, and with his children he probably had no need of any more help, but he looked them up and down, taking in their travel-stained clothes and dusty boots, and allowed as how he could always find work for more hands.

319

[shufu] Grinwell said that [baai] they were going to eat at her [hyō], they would not do it in those filthy [monogoto].

Mistress Grinwell said that if they were going to eat at her table, they would not do it in those filthy things.

320

She was about to do [sentaku butsu], and some of her [otto]’s old [fuku] would fit them [yoku] enough for working.

She was about to do laundry, and some of her husband’s old clothes would fit them well enough for working.

321

She smiled when she said it, and for a [bun] she looked to Rand just like [shufu] al’Vere, though her [kami] was [kiiro]; he had never seen [kami] that [iro] before.

She smiled when she said it, and for a minute she looked to Rand just like Mistress al’Vere, though her hair was yellow; he had never seen hair that color before.

322

Even Mat seemed to lose some of his [kinchō] when her [egao] touched him.

Even Mat seemed to lose some of his tension when her smile touched him.

323

The eldest [musume] was another [mondai].

The eldest daughter was another matter.

324

[Kurai]-haired, big-eyed, and [kawaii], Else grinned impudently at them whenever her [ryōshin] were not looking.

Dark-haired, big-eyed, and pretty, Else grinned impudently at them whenever her parents were not looking.

325

[dōjini, tsutsu, issun] they worked, moving [bareru] and [fukuro] of [kokumotsu] in the [naya], she hung over a [sutōru] [tobira], humming to herself and chewing the [owari] of one long pigtail, watching them.

While they worked, moving barrels and sacks of grain in the barn, she hung over a stall door, humming to herself and chewing the end of one long pigtail, watching them.

326

Rand she watched especially.

Rand she watched especially.

327

He tried to ignore her, [shikashi] after a few [bun] he put on the [shatsu] [shujin] Grinwell had loaned him.

He tried to ignore her, but after a few minutes he put on the shirt Master Grinwell had loaned him.

328

It was tight across the [kata] and too short, [shikashi] it was [yori yoi] than nothing.

It was tight across the shoulders and too short, but it was better than nothing.

329

Else laughed out loud when he tugged it on.

Else laughed out loud when he tugged it on.

330

He began to think that this [jikan] it would not be Mat’s [koshō] when they were chased off.

He began to think that this time it would not be Mat’s fault when they were chased off.

331

Perrin would know how to [handoru] this, he [shikō].

Perrin would know how to handle this, he thought.

332

He’d make some offhand [komento], and [kawaii] soon she’d be laughing at his [jōku] instead of mooning around where her [chichioya] can see.

He’d make some offhand comment, and pretty soon she’d be laughing at his jokes instead of mooning around where her father can see.

333

Only he could not think of any offhand [komento], or any [jōku], either.

Only he could not think of any offhand comment, or any jokes, either.

334

Whenever he looked in her [hōkō], she smiled at him in a [michi] that would have her [chichioya] loosing the [inu] on them [baai] he [mimashita].

Whenever he looked in her direction, she smiled at him in a way that would have her father loosing the dogs on them if he saw.

335

Once she told him she liked tall [dansei].

Once she told him she liked tall men.

336

All the [otokonoko] on the [nōjō] around there were short.

All the boys on the farms around there were short.

337

Mat gave a nasty [shinobiwarai].

Mat gave a nasty snicker.

338

Wishing he could think of a [jōku], Rand tried to concentrate on his [hoshikusa yō kumade].

Wishing he could think of a joke, Rand tried to concentrate on his hayfork.

339

The younger [kodomo tachi], at least, were a [shukufuku] in Rand’s [me].

The younger children, at least, were a blessing in Rand’s eyes.

340

Mat’s [keikai shin] always eased a little when there were [kodomo tachi] around.

Mat’s wariness always eased a little when there were children around.

341

After [yūshoku] they all settled in [furonto] of the [danro], with [shujin] Grinwell in his [okiniiri] [isu] thumbing his [paipu] full of [tabakku] and [shufu] Grinwell fussing with her sewing [bokkusu] and the [shatsu] she had washed for him and Mat.

After supper they all settled in front of the fireplace, with Master Grinwell in his favorite chair thumbing his pipe full of tabac and Mistress Grinwell fussing with her sewing box and the shirts she had washed for him and Mat.

342

Mat [hotta] out Thom’s colored [utsuwa-bw, tama-bl] and began to [jaguringu].

Mat dug out Thom’s colored balls and began to juggle.

343

He never did that unless there were [kodomo tachi].

He never did that unless there were children.

344

The [kodomo tachi] laughed when he pretended to be dropping the [utsuwa-bw, tama-bl], snatching them at the [saigo] [bun], and they clapped for [funsui] and [zu]-eights and a six-[utsuwa-bw, tama-bl] [sākuru] that he really did almost [otosu, shizuku].

The children laughed when he pretended to be dropping the balls, snatching them at the last minute, and they clapped for fountains and figure-eights and a six-ball circle that he really did almost drop.

345

[shikashi] they took it in [yoi] [ichibu], [shujin] Grinwell and his [tsuma] applauding as hard as their [kodomo tachi].

But they took it in good part, Master Grinwell and his wife applauding as hard as their children.

346

When Mat was done, bowing around the [heya] with as many [kakkizuku] as Thom might have made, Rand took Thom’s [furūto] from its case.

When Mat was done, bowing around the room with as many flourishes as Thom might have made, Rand took Thom’s flute from its case.

347

He could never [handoru] the [gakki] without a [pan] of [kanashimi].

He could never handle the instrument without a pang of sadness.

348

Touching its [gōrudo]-and-[gin] [uzumaki] was like touching Thom’s [memori].

Touching its gold-and-silver scrollwork was like touching Thom’s memory.

349

He never handled the [hāpu] except to see that it was safe and [dorai] – Thom had always said the [hāpu] was beyond a farmboy’s clumsy [te][shikashi] whenever a [nōka] allowed them to [taizai], he always played one [kyoku] on the [furūto] after [yūshoku].

He never handled the harp except to see that it was safe and dry – Thom had always said the harp was beyond a farmboy’s clumsy hands – but whenever a farmer allowed them to stay, he always played one tune on the flute after supper.

350

It was just a little something extra to [yūryō] the [nōka], and maybe a [michi] of keeping Thom’s [memori] fresh.

It was just a little something extra to pay the farmer, and maybe a way of keeping Thom’s memory fresh.

351

With a laughing [kibun] already set by Mat’s juggling, he played "Three [onnanoko] in the [sōgen]."

With a laughing mood already set by Mat’s juggling, he played “Three Girls in the Meadow.”

352

[shujin] and [shufu] Grinwell clapped along, and the smaller [kodomo tachi] danced around the [yuka], even the smallest [otokonoko], who could barely [sanpo], stomping his [ashi] in [jikan].

Master and Mistress Grinwell clapped along, and the smaller children danced around the floor, even the smallest boy, who could barely walk, stomping his feet in time.

353

He knew he would [shōri] no prizes at Bel [kōdinēto], [shikashi] after Thom’s [shidō] he would not be embarrassed to enter.

He knew he would win no prizes at Bel Tine, but after Thom’s teaching he would not be embarrassed to enter.

354

Else was sitting [kurosu]-legged in [furonto] of the [kasai], and as he lowered the [furūto] after the [saigo] [chūi shite kudasai], she leaned forward with a long [tameiki] and smiled at him.

Else was sitting cross-legged in front of the fire, and as he lowered the flute after the last note, she leaned forward with a long sigh and smiled at him.

355

"You [geki] so beautifully.

“You play so beautifully.

356

I never heard anything so beautiful.”

I never heard anything so beautiful.”

357

[shufu] Grinwell suddenly paused in her sewing and raised an [mayu] at her [musume], then gave Rand a long, appraising [hyōjō].

Mistress Grinwell suddenly paused in her sewing and raised an eyebrow at her daughter, then gave Rand a long, appraising look.

358

He had picked up the [kawa] case to put the [furūto] away, [shikashi] under her [gyōshi] he dropped the case and almost the [furūto], too.

He had picked up the leather case to put the flute away, but under her stare he dropped the case and almost the flute, too.

359

[baai] she accused him of trifling with her [musume]...

If she accused him of trifling with her daughter...

360

In [zetsubō] he put the [furūto] back to his [kuchibiru] and played another [uta], then another, and another.

In desperation he put the flute back to his lips and played another song, then another, and another.

361

[shufu] Grinwell kept watching him.

Mistress Grinwell kept watching him.

362

He played "The [kaze] That Shakes the [yanagi],"

He played “The Wind That Shakes the Willow,”

363

and "Coming home From Tarwin’s [kangeki],"

and “Coming Home From Tarwin’s Gap,”

364

and "[shufu] Aynora’s [rū sutā],"

and “Mistress Aynora’s Rooster,”

365

and "The Old [kuro] [kuma]."

and “The Old Black Bear.”

366

He played every [uta] he could think of, [shikashi] she never took her [me] off him.

He played every song he could think of, but she never took her eyes off him.

367

She never said anything, either, [shikashi] she watched, and weighed.

She never said anything, either, but she watched, and weighed.

368

It was late when [shujin] Grinwell finally stood up, chuckling and rubbing his [te] together.

It was late when Master Grinwell finally stood up, chuckling and rubbing his hands together.

369

"[yoku], this has been rare [tanoshii], [shikashi] it’s [michi] past our [shūshin ji].

“Well, this has been rare fun, but it’s way past our bedtime.

370

You traveling [wakamono] make your own [jikan], [shikashi] [asa] comes early on a [nōjō].

You traveling lads make your own hours, but morning comes early on a farm.

371

I’ll tell you [wakamono], I have paid [yoi] [okane] at an [in] for no [yori yoi] [entāteimento] than I’ve had this [yoru, kishi_knt].

I’ll tell you lads, I have paid good money at an inn for no better entertainment than I’ve had this night.

372

For worse.”

For worse.”

373

"I think they should have a [hōshū], [chichioya],"

“I think they should have a reward, father,”

374

[shufu] Grinwell said as she picked up her youngest [otokonoko], who had long since fallen asleep in [furonto] of the [kasai].

Mistress Grinwell said as she picked up her youngest boy, who had long since fallen asleep in front of the fire.

375

"The [naya] is no fit [basho] to [suimin].

“The barn is no fit place to sleep.

376

They can [suimin] in Else’s [heya] tonight, and she will [suimin] with me."

They can sleep in Else’s room tonight, and she will sleep with me.”

377

Else grimaced.

Else grimaced.

378

She was careful to [kīpu] her [atama] down, [shikashi] Rand [mimashita] it.

She was careful to keep her head down, but Rand saw it.

379

He [shikō] her [haha] did, too.

He thought her mother did, too.

380

[shujin] Grinwell nodded.

Master Grinwell nodded.

381

"Yes, yes, much [yori yoi] than the [naya].

“Yes, yes, much better than the barn.

382

[baai] you don’t [kokoro] sleeping two to a [shindai], that is."

If you don’t mind sleeping two to a bed, that is.”

383

Rand flushed; [shufu] Grinwell was still looking at him.

Rand flushed; Mistress Grinwell was still looking at him.

384

"I do [negai] I could hear more of that [furūto].

“I do wish I could hear more of that flute.

385

And your juggling, too.

And your juggling, too.

386

I like that.

I like that.

387

You know, there’s a little [tasuku] you could [tasukeru] with tomorrow, and—"

You know, there’s a little task you could help with tomorrow, and —”

388

"They’ll be wanting an early [kaishi, hajimeru], [chichioya],"

“They’ll be wanting an early start, father,”

389

[shufu] Grinwell cut in.

Mistress Grinwell cut in.

390

"Arien is the next [mura] the [michi] they’re going, and [baai] they intend to try their [un] at the [in] there, they’ll have to [sanpo] all [ichi nichi] to get there before [kurai]."

“Arien is the next village the way they’re going, and if they intend to try their luck at the inn there, they’ll have to walk all day to get there before dark.”

391

"Yes, [shufu],"

“Yes, mistress,”

392

Rand said, “we will.

Rand said, “we will.

393

And thank you.”

And thank you.”

394

She gave him a tight-lipped [egao] as [baai] she knew [hijō ni] [yoku] that his [arigatō gozaimasu] were for more than her [jogen], or even [yūshoku] and a [atatakai] [shindai].

She gave him a tight-lipped smile as if she knew very well that his thanks were for more than her advice, or even supper and a warm bed.

395

The whole next [ichi nichi] Mat twitted him about Else as they made their [michi] down the [dōro].

The whole next day Mat twitted him about Else as they made their way down the road.

396

He kept trying to [henkō] the [taishō], and what the Grinwells had suggested about performing at [ryokan] was the easiest [koto] to [kokoro].

He kept trying to change the subject, and what the Grinwells had suggested about performing at inns was the easiest thing to mind.

397

In the [asa], with Else pouting as he left, and [shufu] Grinwell watching with a sharp-eyed [hyōjō] of [yoi yakkai harai] and soonest-mended, it was just something to [kīpu] Mat from talking.

In the morning, with Else pouting as he left, and Mistress Grinwell watching with a sharp-eyed look of good-riddance and soonest-mended, it was just something to keep Mat from talking.

398

By the [jikan] they did [rīchi] the next [mura], it was something else again.

By the time they did reach the next village, it was something else again.

399

With [yūgure] descending, they entered the only [in] in Arien, and Rand spoke to the [yadoya no shujin].

With dusk descending, they entered the only inn in Arien, and Rand spoke to the innkeeper.

400

He played "[ferī] O’er the [kawa]"

He played “Ferry O’er the River”

401

– which the plump [yadoya no shujin] called "[dārin] [sara]"

– which the plump innkeeper called “Darling Sara”

402

– and [ichibu] of "The [dōro] to Dun Aren,"

– and part of “The Road to Dun Aren,”

403

and Mat did a little juggling, and the [ketsuron] was that they slept in a [shindai] that [yoru, kishi_knt] and ate roasted [jagaimo] and [atsui] [gyūniku].

and Mat did a little juggling, and the upshot was that they slept in a bed that night and ate roasted potatoes and hot beef.

404

It was the smallest [heya] in the [in], to be sure, up under the [nokishita] in the [rimen], and the [shokuji] came in the [mannaka] of a long [yoru, kishi_knt] of playing and juggling, [shikashi] it was still a [shindai] beneath a [yane].

It was the smallest room in the inn, to be sure, up under the eaves in the back, and the meal came in the middle of a long night of playing and juggling, but it was still a bed beneath a roof.

405

Even [yori yoi], to Rand, every [natsujikan] [jikan] had been spent traveling.

Even better, to Rand, every daylight hour had been spent traveling.

406

And the [in]’s [jōren kyaku] did not seem to [kaigo] [baai] Mat stared at them suspiciously.

And the inn’s patrons did not seem to care if Mat stared at them suspiciously.

407

Some of them even looked askance at one another.

Some of them even looked askance at one another.

408

The [kai] made [utagai] of [gaijin] a [atarimae], and there were always [gaijin] at an [in].

The times made suspicion of strangers a commonplace, and there were always strangers at an inn.

409

Rand slept [yori yoi] than he had since leaving Whitebridge, despite sharing a [shindai] with Mat and his nocturnal muttering.

Rand slept better than he had since leaving Whitebridge, despite sharing a bed with Mat and his nocturnal muttering.

410

In the [asa] the [yadoya no shujin] tried to [hanashi] them into staying another [ichi nichi] or two, [shikashi] when he could not, he called over a bleary-eyed [nōka] who had drunk too much to [doraibu] his [kāto] home the [yoru, kishi_knt] before.

In the morning the innkeeper tried to talk them into staying another day or two, but when he could not, he called over a bleary-eyed farmer who had drunk too much to drive his cart home the night before.

411

An [jikan] later they were five [mairu] further [higashi], sprawling on their [bakkuappu shimasu] on the [wara] in the [rimen] of Eazil Forney’s [kāto].

An hour later they were five miles further east, sprawling on their backs on the straw in the back of Eazil Forney’s cart.

412

That became the [michi] of their traveling.

That became the way of their traveling.

413

With a little [un], and maybe a [noru] or two, they could almost always [rīchi] the next [mura] by [kurai].

With a little luck, and maybe a ride or two, they could almost always reach the next village by dark.

414

[baai] there was more than one [in] in a [mura], the [yadoya] would bid for them once they heard Rand’s [furūto] and [mimashita] Mat [jaguringu].

If there was more than one inn in a village, the innkeepers would bid for them once they heard Rand’s flute and saw Mat juggle.

415

Together they still did not come [tojiru] to a [ginyūshijin], [shikashi] they were more than most [mura] [mimashita] in a [toshi].

Together they still did not come close to a gleeman, but they were more than most villages saw in a year.

416

Two or three [ryokan] in a [machi] meant a [yori yoi] [heya], with two [shindai], and more generous [bubun] of a [yori yoi] cut of [niku], and sometimes even a few [dōka] in their [poketto] when they left besides.

Two or three inns in a town meant a better room, with two beds, and more generous portions of a better cut of meat, and sometimes even a few coppers in their pockets when they left besides.

417

In the [asa] there was almost always [dare-ka] to [teikyō] a [noru], another [nōka] who had stayed too late and drunk too much, or a [shōnin] who had liked their [entāteimento] enough not to [kokoro] [baai] they hopped up on the [rimen] of one of his [wagon].

In the mornings there was almost always someone to offer a ride, another farmer who had stayed too late and drunk too much, or a merchant who had liked their entertainment enough not to mind if they hopped up on the back of one of his wagons.

418

Rand began to think their [mondai] were over till they reached Caemlyn.

Rand began to think their problems were over till they reached Caemlyn.

419

[shikashi] then they came to Four [ō].

But then they came to Four Kings.

420

[akira] 32

Chapter 32

421

Four [ō] in [kage]

Four Kings in Shadow

422

The [mura] was bigger than most, [shikashi] still a scruffy [machi] to [kuma] a [namae] like Four [ō].

The village was bigger than most, but still a scruffy town to bear a name like Four Kings.

423

As usual, the Caemlyn [dōro] hashitta straight through the [sentā] of the [machi], [shikashi] another heavily traveled [kōsoku dōro] came in from the [minami], too.

As usual, the Caemlyn Road ran straight through the center of the town, but another heavily traveled highway came in from the south, too.

424

Most [mura] were [shijō] and gathering [basho] for the [nōka] of the [eria], [shikashi] there were few [nōka] to be seen here.

Most villages were markets and gathering places for the farmers of the area, but there were few farmers to be seen here.

425

Four [ō] survived as a stopover for [shōnin][wagon] [ressha] on their [michi] to Caemlyn and to the mining [machi] in the [yama] of [misuto] beyond Baerlon, as [yoku] as the [mura] between.

Four Kings survived as a stopover for merchants’ wagon trains on their way to Caemlyn and to the mining towns in the Mountains of Mist beyond Baerlon, as well as the villages between.

426

The southern [dōro] carried [rugādo]’s [bōeki] with the mine in the [nishi]; Lugarder [shōnin] going to Caemlyn had a more direct [rūto].

The southern road carried Lugard’s trade with the mines in the west; Lugarder merchants going to Caemlyn had a more direct route.

427

The [shūi] [kuni] held few [nōjō], barely enough to [fīdo] themselves and the [machi], and everything in the [mura] centered on the [shōnin] and their [wagon], the [dansei] who [unten shita] them and the [rōdōsha] who loaded the [seihin].

The surrounding country held few farms, barely enough to feed themselves and the town, and everything in the village centered on the merchants and their wagons, the men who drove them and the laborers who loaded the goods.

428

[purotto] of bare [chikyū], [gurando] to [hokori], lay scattered through Four [ō], filled with [wagon] parked [hoīru] to [hoīru] and abandoned except for a few bored [keibi].

Plots of bare earth, ground to dust, lay scattered through Four Kings, filled with wagons parked wheel to wheel and abandoned except for a few bored guards.

429

[kyūsha] and [uma ga takusan] lined the [machi], all of which were wide enough to allow [wagon] to pass and deeply rutted from too many [hoīru].

Stables and horse-lots lined the streets, all of which were wide enough to allow wagons to pass and deeply rutted from too many wheels.

430

There was no [mura] [midori], and the [kodomo tachi] played in the [wa da-chi], dodging [wagon] and the [noroi] of [wagon] [doraibā].

There was no village green, and the children played in the ruts, dodging wagons and the curses of wagon drivers.

431

[mura] [josei], their [heddo] covered with scarves, kept their [me] down and walked quickly, sometimes followed by wagoneers’ [komento] that made Rand blush; even Mat gave a [kaishi, hajimeru] at some of them.

Village women, their heads covered with scarves, kept their eyes down and walked quickly, sometimes followed by wagoneers’ comments that made Rand blush; even Mat gave a start at some of them.

432

No [onna] stood gossiping over the [fensu] with a [rinjin].

No woman stood gossiping over the fence with a neighbor.

433

[tanchō] wooden [hausu] stood [hō] by jowl, with only [semai] [roji] between and [shikkui] – where anyone had bothered to [shikkui] the weathered [bōdo] – faded as [baai] it had not been freshened in [toshi].

Drab wooden houses stood cheek by jowl, with only narrow alleys between and whitewash – where anyone had bothered to whitewash the weathered boards – faded as if it had not been freshened in years.

434

Heavy [shattā] on the [hausu] had not been [ōpun] in so long that the [hinji] were [kotai] [shikori] of [sabi].

Heavy shutters on the houses had not been open in so long that the hinges were solid lumps of rust.

435

[noizu] hung over everything, clanging from [tanya ya], [sakebu] from the [wagon] [doraibā], raucous [warai] from the [machi]’s [ryokan].

Noise hung over everything, clanging from blacksmiths, shouts from the wagon drivers, raucous laughter from the town’s inns.

436

Rand swung down from the [rimen] of a [shōnin]’s [kyanbasu]-topped [wagon] as they came abreast of a garishly painted [in], all [gurīnzu] and [kiiro] that caught the [me] from afar among the leaden [hausu].

Rand swung down from the back of a merchant’s canvas-topped wagon as they came abreast of a garishly painted inn, all greens and yellows that caught the eye from afar among the leaden houses.

437

The [rain] of [wagon] kept moving.

The line of wagons kept moving.

438

None of the [doraibā] even seemed to [chūi shite kudasai] that he and Mat had gone; [yūgure] was falling, and they all had their [me] on unhitching the [uma] and reaching the [ryokan].

None of the drivers even seemed to notice that he and Mat had gone; dusk was falling, and they all had their eyes on unhitching the horses and reaching the inns.

439

Rand stumbled in a [manneri], then leaped quickly to avoid a heavy-laden [wagon] clattering the [sonota] [michi].

Rand stumbled in a rut, then leaped quickly to avoid a heavy-laden wagon clattering the other way.

440

The [doraibā] shouted a [noroi] at him as the [wagon] rolled by.

The driver shouted a curse at him as the wagon rolled by.

441

A [mura] [onna] stepped around him and hurried on without ever [kaigi] his [me].

A village woman stepped around him and hurried on without ever meeting his eye.

442

"I don’t know about this [basho],"

“I don’t know about this place,”

443

he said.

he said.

444

He [shikō] he could hear [ongaku] mixed in the din, [shikashi] he could not tell from where it was coming.

He thought he could hear music mixed in the din, but he could not tell from where it was coming.

445

From the [in], maybe, [shikashi] it was hard to be sure.

From the inn, maybe, but it was hard to be sure.

446

“I don’t like it.

“I don’t like it.

447

Maybe we’d [yori yoi] go on this [jikan]."

Maybe we’d better go on this time.”

448

Mat gave him a scornful [hyōjō], then rolled his [me] at the [sora].

Mat gave him a scornful look, then rolled his eyes at the sky.

449

[Kurai] [kumo] thickened overhead.

Dark clouds thickened overhead.

450

"And [suimin] under a [hejji] tonight?

“And sleep under a hedge tonight?

451

In that?

In that?

452

I’m used to a [shindai] again."

I’m used to a bed again.”

453

He cocked his [atama] to listen, then grunted.

He cocked his head to listen, then grunted.

454

"Maybe one of these [basho] doesn’t have [myūjishan].

“Maybe one of these places doesn’t have musicians.

455

Anyway, I’ll [kake] they don’t have a [jagurā]."

Anyway, I’ll bet they don’t have a juggler.”

456

He slung his [bou] across his [kata] and started for the bright [kiiro] [tobira], studying everything through narrowed [me].

He slung his bow across his shoulders and started for the bright yellow door, studying everything through narrowed eyes.

457

Rand followed doubtfully.

Rand followed doubtfully.

458

There were [myūjishan] [uchigawa], their [tsitā] and [doramu] almost drowned in coarse [warai] and drunken shouting.

There were musicians inside, their zither and drum almost drowned in coarse laughter and drunken shouting.

459

Rand did not bother to find the [yanushi].

Rand did not bother to find the landlord.

460

The next two [ryokan] had [myūjishan] as [yoku], and the same deafening [fukyōwaon].

The next two inns had musicians as well, and the same deafening cacophony.

461

Roughly dressed [dansei] filled the [hyō] and stumbled across the [yuka], waving [magukappu] and trying to fondle serving [meido] who dodged with fixed, long-[kurushimi] [egao].

Roughly dressed men filled the tables and stumbled across the floor, waving mugs and trying to fondle serving maids who dodged with fixed, long-suffering smiles.

462

The [tatemono] shook with the [raketto], and the [nioi] was sour, a [akushū] of old [Kajitsu-sake] and unwashed [bodi].

The buildings shook with the racket, and the smell was sour, a stench of old wine and unwashed bodies.

463

Of the [shōnin], in their [shiruku] and [berubetto] and [rēsu], there was no [sain]; private dining [heya] abovestairs protected their [mimi] and [hana].

Of the merchants, in their silk and velvet and lace, there was no sign; private dining rooms abovestairs protected their ears and noses.

464

He and Mat only put their [heddo] in the [tobira] before leaving.

He and Mat only put their heads in the doors before leaving.

465

He was [hajime] to think they would have no [sentaku] [shikashi] to [ugokasu] on.

He was beginning to think they would have no choice but to move on.

466

The fourth [in], The Dancing Cartman, stood silent.

The fourth inn, The Dancing Cartman, stood silent.

467

It was as gaudy as the [sonota] [ryokan], [kiiro] trimmed in bright [akai] and bilious, [me]-wrenching [midori], though here the [peinto] was cracked and peeling.

It was as gaudy as the other inns, yellow trimmed in bright red and bilious, eye-wrenching green, though here the paint was cracked and peeling.

468

Rand and Mat stepped [uchigawa].

Rand and Mat stepped inside.

469

Only [hanbun] a dozen [dansei] sat at the [hyō] that filled the common [heya], hunched over their [magukappu], each one glumly alone with his [shikō].

Only half a dozen men sat at the tables that filled the common room, hunched over their mugs, each one glumly alone with his thoughts.

470

[bijinesu] was definitely not [yoi], [shikashi] it had been [yori yoi] once.

Business was definitely not good, but it had been better once.

471

Exactly as many serving [meido] as there were [jōren kyaku] busied themselves around the [heya].

Exactly as many serving maids as there were patrons busied themselves around the room.

472

There was [takusan] for them to do – [yogore] crusted the [yuka] and [kumonosu] filled the [kōnā] of the [tenjō][shikashi] most were not doing anything really useful, only moving so they would not be seen standing still.

There was plenty for them to do – dirt crusted the floor and cobwebs filled the corners of the ceiling – but most were not doing anything really useful, only moving so they would not be seen standing still.

473

A [hone no] [otoko] with long, stringy [kami] to his [kata] turned to scowl at them as they came through the [tobira].

A bony man with long, stringy hair to his shoulders turned to scowl at them as they came through the door.

474

The [saisho] [osoi] [todoroku] of [kaminari] rumbled across Four [ō].

The first slow peal of thunder rumbled across Four Kings.

475

“What do you want?”

“What do you want?”

476

He was rubbing his [te] on a greasy [epuron] that hung to his [ashikubi].

He was rubbing his hands on a greasy apron that hung to his ankles.

477

Rand wondered [baai] more [yogore] was coming off on the [epuron] or on the [otoko]’s [te].

Rand wondered if more grime was coming off on the apron or on the man’s hands.

478

He was the [saisho] skinny [yadoya no shujin] Rand had seen.

He was the first skinny innkeeper Rand had seen.

479

"[yoku]?

“Well?

480

Speak up, buy a [dorinku], or get out!

Speak up, buy a drink, or get out!

481

Do I [hyōjō] like a raree [shō]?"

Do I look like a raree show?”

482

Flushing, Rand launched into the [netsuben] he had perfected at [ryokan] before this.

Flushing, Rand launched into the spiel he had perfected at inns before this.

483

"I [geki] the [furūto], and my [yūjin] [jaguringu], and you’ll not see two [yori yoi] in a [toshi].

“I play the flute, and my friend juggles, and you’ll not see two better in a year.

484

For a [yoi] [heya] and a [yoi] [shokuji], we’ll [nuritsubushi] this common [heya] of yours."

For a good room and a good meal, we’ll fill this common room of yours.”

485

He remembered the filled common [heya] he had already seen that [yūgata], especially the [otoko] who had vomited [migi] in [furonto] of him at the [saigo] one.

He remembered the filled common rooms he had already seen that evening, especially the man who had vomited right in front of him at the last one.

486

He had had to [suteppu] lively to [kīpu] his [būtsu] untouched.

He had had to step lively to keep his boots untouched.

487

He faltered, [shikashi] caught himself and went on.

He faltered, but caught himself and went on.

488

"We’ll [nuritsubushi] your [in] with [dansei] who will repay the little we [kosuto] twenty [kai] over with the [tabemono] and [dorinku] they buy.

“We’ll fill your inn with men who will repay the little we cost twenty times over with the food and drink they buy.

489

Why should—”

Why should —”

490

"I’ve got a [otoko] plays the [darushimā],"

“I’ve got a man plays the dulcimer,”

491

the [yadoya no shujin] said sourly.

the innkeeper said sourly.

492

“You have a drunk, Saml Hake,”

“You have a drunk, Saml Hake,”

493

one of the serving [meido] said.

one of the serving maids said.

494

She was passing him with a [torei] and two [magukappu], and she paused to give Rand and Mat a plump [egao].

She was passing him with a tray and two mugs, and she paused to give Rand and Mat a plump smile.

495

"Most [kai], he can’t see [yoku] enough to find the common [heya],"

“Most times, he can’t see well enough to find the common room,”

496

she confided in a loud [sasayaku].

she confided in a loud whisper.

497

"haven’t even seen him in two [hi]."

“Haven’t even seen him in two days.”

498

Without taking his [me] off Rand and Mat, Hake casually backhanded her across the [kao].

Without taking his eyes off Rand and Mat, Hake casually backhanded her across the face.

499

She gave a surprised [isaki] and fell heavily to the unwashed [yuka]; one of the [magukappu] broke, and the spilled [Kajitsu-sake] washed [ogawa] in the [yogore].

She gave a surprised grunt and fell heavily to the unwashed floor; one of the mugs broke, and the spilled wine washed rivulets in the dirt.

500

"You’re docked for the [Kajitsu-sake] and [hason].

“You’re docked for the wine and breakage.