A Trip to the Beach by Melinda Blanchard and Robert Blanchard Flashcards Preview

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1

Anguillians have their own terminology for direction. The word above means east and below means west.

A Trip to the Beach by Melinda Blanchard and Robert Blanchard

2

Why would anyone choose to live surrounded by concrete and traffic rather than fishing boats, water, and palm trees?

A Trip to the Beach by Melinda Blanchard and Robert Blanchard

3

“You gotta pay duty on everything in Anguilla.”

A Trip to the Beach by Melinda Blanchard and Robert Blanchard

4

incredible buoyancy of the salt water made him feel as though he had on a life jacket.

A Trip to the Beach by Melinda Blanchard and Robert Blanchard

5

Island time. It slowed our heartbeats and eased our blood pressure.

A Trip to the Beach by Melinda Blanchard and Robert Blanchard

6

In Anguilla, the game of dominos requires only a table, something to sit on, a set of dominos, and, most important, shade. A domino tree is centrally located in almost every village, strategically placed where taxi drivers congregate, in front of a grocery store or even at a gas station. The game’s popularity is understandable in the eighty-five-degree weather, and besides, it’s easier to drink a Heineken while playing dominos than, say, soccer. But it is serious sport. There are week-long domino tournaments. There are domino teams with uniforms. There are traveling domino teams that fly or boat to other islands, claiming international trophies. I used to think dominos was an easygoing diversion in which players ponder a move and quietly place their pieces on the table in an orderly, even reserved, fashion. Not in Anguilla. The technique for slamming is highly developed and practiced. Dominos are discreetly hidden in one hand—held like playing cards—and once a play has been determined, the chosen piece is raised slowly above the table, as if the player were sneaking up to assassinate a fly. Once this slow, methodical arm raising has created sufficient suspense, bam—the domino is slapped down on the table, often with enough force to bounce the pieces several inches in the air. The exuberance and gusto with which the pieces are slammed down actually makes it a lively spectator sport. Heated games often last long into the night, with small crowds of anxious onlookers waiting to get a turn. Sometimes several tables are lined up in a row and players rotate between games. Bets are placed, money changes hands, and the slamming rhythm intensifies as the stakes rise. Instead of a throbbing head from too much partying, a domino champion wakes the next morning with a throbbing hand.

A Trip to the Beach by Melinda Blanchard and Robert Blanchard

7

The Caribbean is known for its jerk sauce,

A Trip to the Beach by Melinda Blanchard and Robert Blanchard

8

Guava juice, we discovered, was the missing ingredient from most we tried, and freshly squeezed orange juice was a must. Still, our final recipe was simple. Combine equal amounts of pineapple juice, guava juice, freshly squeezed orange juice, and Mt. Gay rum. Add just a dash of grenadine and another of Angostura bitters. Pour over ice and top with a sprinkle of nutmeg.

A Trip to the Beach by Melinda Blanchard and Robert Blanchard

9

Three generations filled her house with energy and love.

A Trip to the Beach by Melinda Blanchard and Robert Blanchard

10

their produce came by boat from Santo Domingo every two weeks and I should come back on Thursday for a better selection.

A Trip to the Beach by Melinda Blanchard and Robert Blanchard

11

“Haven’t you seen salt ponds all over the island?” Clinton asked. “Until ’bout fifteen years ago, they harvest salt outta the ponds and ship it all over the Caribbean—even England. It was how everybody earn a living here before we had tourists. When you see the foam it mean the pond ripe for pickin. It mean there’s plenty of salt.” “What did they do, collect all these bubbles and dry them out?” “Mel. You wanna hear about pickin’ the ponds, you gotta talk to Mammy. She work in the ponds for years, and she love to talk.”

A Trip to the Beach by Melinda Blanchard and Robert Blanchard

12

There was a charisma about Anguillian women that was almost startling, I thought, looking around the bank. They walked slowly, with exceptional posture. They had high cheekbones, smooth chocolate skin, and smiles that illuminated the room around them.

A Trip to the Beach by Melinda Blanchard and Robert Blanchard

13

Anguilla has always been an offshore tax haven.

A Trip to the Beach by Melinda Blanchard and Robert Blanchard

14

A bank job in Anguilla was like a bus ticket out of small-town Kansas. It wasn’t vanity that made these women beautiful, it was pride.

A Trip to the Beach by Melinda Blanchard and Robert Blanchard

15

everyone, including locals, has accounts in more than one place.

A Trip to the Beach by Melinda Blanchard and Robert Blanchard

16

Hard work is good therapy,

A Trip to the Beach by Melinda Blanchard and Robert Blanchard

17

It’s as much about the people as the beach and the views.

A Trip to the Beach by Melinda Blanchard and Robert Blanchard

18

We religiously checked shoes each morning—these bugs love to hide in the cool toe of a sneaker—but

A Trip to the Beach by Melinda Blanchard and Robert Blanchard

19

A favorite throughout the Caribbean is a fish called wahoo.

A Trip to the Beach by Melinda Blanchard and Robert Blanchard

20

No one was able to define the term ground sea, but it is an oddity that seafarers must know in their souls. It was an underwater storm that assaulted the beach in front of the restaurant. The noise was deafening as ten-foot waves crashed against the sand, drowning out all conversation in the dining room. Yet the sky overhead was clear and blue, and relaxed island pelicans stood patiently on the rocks, backs to the wind, waiting for the sea to calm down so they could resume fishing.

A Trip to the Beach by Melinda Blanchard and Robert Blanchard

21

Tourists continually asked why prices in Anguilla are so high. If they spent only one week trying to supply a restaurant, they’d understand immediately.

A Trip to the Beach by Melinda Blanchard and Robert Blanchard

22

Bob and I might be the only people in Anguilla to wear seat belts. Clinton actually was worried that I might be putting my life in danger with this practice and had tried to convince me to listen to reason.

A Trip to the Beach by Melinda Blanchard and Robert Blanchard

23

There are no turkeys in Anguilla. We decided to fly them in from Miami, even though air freight would cost more than the turkeys themselves. It was risky planning Thanksgiving dinner on a British island in the Caribbean,

A Trip to the Beach by Melinda Blanchard and Robert Blanchard

24

Anguillians had watched St. Martin lose its innocence. Over twenty short years, the arrival of giant resorts and casinos combined with a poorly managed immigration department had made it a haven for unemployment, crime, and a population that had lost control of its own destiny.

A Trip to the Beach by Melinda Blanchard and Robert Blanchard

25

Our theories about germs had no foundation, Bob and I were told, and the perils of sudden temperature changes were impossible to dispute. Cooking in any restaurant kitchen calls for frequent trips into the walk-in cooler, but in Anguilla this took some coaxing. When necessary, our staff dutifully went in, but not before placing a small towel on top of their head. This, they agreed, would ward off the flu.

A Trip to the Beach by Melinda Blanchard and Robert Blanchard

26

Rastas always put an I in front of their last name—something to do with their religion and positive energy. They believed it added strength and purity to a name.

A Trip to the Beach by Melinda Blanchard and Robert Blanchard

27

On Sunday mornings in Anguilla families gathered in churchyards for the service. Little boys wore jackets, usually handed down from a long line of brothers and cousins, and girls were in pastel dresses, lacy socks cuffed at the ankle, and shiny black patent leather shoes, their hair braided with ribbons and bows to match their dresses.

A Trip to the Beach by Melinda Blanchard and Robert Blanchard

28

CNN is as popular as wrestling and religion.

A Trip to the Beach by Melinda Blanchard and Robert Blanchard

29

life in the slow lane allows us time to detect the subtleties. You just can’t be in a hurry here.

A Trip to the Beach by Melinda Blanchard and Robert Blanchard

30

The songs were all familiar but were played in a livelier tempo with a reggae beat.

A Trip to the Beach by Melinda Blanchard and Robert Blanchard

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