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1

The area is most effectively defined by its soil. You know you are in Patagonia when you see rodados patagonicos, the basalt pebbles left behind by glaciers, and jarilla, the low bush that is its dominant flora. 107

In Patagonia by Bruce Chatwin

2

Patagonia’s nothingness forces the mind in on itself. 111

In Patagonia by Bruce Chatwin

3

Ted Turner and Sylvester Stallone have bought properties there.132

In Patagonia by Bruce Chatwin

4

Chatwin was particularly adept at extracting from perfect strangers their best stories and making extravagant connections. 151

In Patagonia by Bruce Chatwin

5

marvelous and limitless backdrop against which to play out his thesis. A theater for his own restlessness, Patagonia, he would covertly argue, was the source of everyone else’s restlessness too. 232

In Patagonia by Bruce Chatwin

6

(Maté incidentally is a drink for which I also have a love/hate relationship). 279

In Patagonia by Bruce Chatwin

7

Bridges observed: “If you haven’t ruffled any feathers, you certainly haven’t written anything worth writing.” 324

In Patagonia by Bruce Chatwin

8

the Welsh community of Gaiman, 328

In Patagonia by Bruce Chatwin

9

Chatwin’s book, she often wrote to the Buenos Aires Herald, “whilst containing some elements of truth was much exaggerated and in some instance pure lies.” 342

In Patagonia by Bruce Chatwin

10

“Everything that is in the book happened, although of course in another order.” The “lies” he admits to Ignatieff are examples of his romanticism, as when he describes an ordinary stainless steel chair as being “by Mies van der Rohe” 349

In Patagonia by Bruce Chatwin

11

He told not a half-truth but a truth and a half. 353

In Patagonia by Bruce Chatwin

12

This version was less romantic but had the merit of being true. 403

In Patagonia by Bruce Chatwin

13

‘He was very macho,’ she said, ‘like most Argentine boys, but I never thought it would come to that.’ 438

In Patagonia by Bruce Chatwin

14

He loved his country with the passion of the second generation immigrant 467

In Patagonia by Bruce Chatwin

15

He did his duty to his country and up-ended the chronology. He twisted the evidence to show that all hot-blooded mammals began in South America and went north. And then he got quite carried away: he published a paper suggesting that Man himself had emerged from the soil of the patria; which is why, in some circles, the name of Ameghino is set beside Plato and Newton. 479

In Patagonia by Bruce Chatwin

16

‘My neighbours are Italian,’ Bill said. ‘The Its have got the whole region buttoned up. All came from one village in the Marches forty years back. 517

In Patagonia by Bruce Chatwin

17

Do you know what we pray for down here? Pray for sadistically? Bad winter in Europe. Makes the price of wool go up.’ 554

In Patagonia by Bruce Chatwin

18

The Indians were migrant workers from Southern Chile. They were Araucanian Indians. A hundred years ago the Araucanians were incredibly fierce and brave. They painted their bodies red and flayed their enemies alive and sucked at the hearts of the dead. 601

In Patagonia by Bruce Chatwin

19

The Araucanians are still very tough and would be a lot tougher if they gave up drink. 606

In Patagonia by Bruce Chatwin

20

The Patagonian. desert is not a desert of sand or gravel, but a low thicket of grey-leaved thorns which give off a bitter smell when crushed. 614

In Patagonia by Bruce Chatwin

21

desert wanderers discover in themselves a primaeval calmness 621

In Patagonia by Bruce Chatwin

22

He was thirty-three (the age when geniuses die), 640

In Patagonia by Bruce Chatwin

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he made the common tourist’s mistake of confusing fifteen for fifty pesos.) 668

In Patagonia by Bruce Chatwin

24

history of the Kingdom of Araucania and Patagonia belongs rather to the obsessions of bourgeois France than to the politics of South America. 700

In Patagonia by Bruce Chatwin

25

Port Madryn. A hundred and fifty-three Welsh colonists landed here off the brig Mimosa in 1865. 716

In Patagonia by Bruce Chatwin

26

the village of Gaimán, the centre of Welsh Patagonia today. 734

In Patagonia by Bruce Chatwin

27

The colonists came with few possessions but they clung to their family clocks. 737

In Patagonia by Bruce Chatwin

28

salmuera, made of vinegar, garlic, chillies and oregano. 769

In Patagonia by Bruce Chatwin

29

‘Patagonia!’ he cried. ‘She is a hard mistress. She casts her spell. An enchantress! She folds you in her arms and never lets go.’ 852

In Patagonia by Bruce Chatwin

30

The Persians had come to Patagonia as missionaries for their world religion. They had plenty of money and had stuffed the place with the trappings of middle-class Teheran—wine-red 918

In Patagonia by Bruce Chatwin

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