How Will You Measure Your Life? by Clayton M. Christensen, James Allworth, and Karen Dillon Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in How Will You Measure Your Life? by Clayton M. Christensen, James Allworth, and Karen Dillon Deck (300)
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1

Despite such professional accomplishments, however, many of them were clearly unhappy.

How Will You Measure Your Life? by Clayton M. Christensen, James Allworth, and Karen Dillon

2

We are there to explore not what we hope will happen to us but rather what the theories predict will happen to us, as a result of different decisions and actions.

How Will You Measure Your Life? by Clayton M. Christensen, James Allworth, and Karen Dillon

3

Then I write three simple questions beside those theories: How can I be sure that I will be successful and happy in my career? My relationships with my spouse, my children, and my extended family and close friends become an enduring source of happiness? I live a life of integrity—and stay out of jail?

How Will You Measure Your Life? by Clayton M. Christensen, James Allworth, and Karen Dillon

4

The Difference Between What to Think and How to Think

How Will You Measure Your Life? by Clayton M. Christensen, James Allworth, and Karen Dillon

5

But instead of telling him what to think, I taught him how to think. He then reached a bold decision about what to do, on his own.

How Will You Measure Your Life? by Clayton M. Christensen, James Allworth, and Karen Dillon

6

When people ask me something, I now rarely answer directly. Instead, I run the question through a theory in my own mind, so I know what the theory says is likely to be the result of one course of action, compared to another.

How Will You Measure Your Life? by Clayton M. Christensen, James Allworth, and Karen Dillon

7

A good theory doesn’t change its mind: it doesn’t apply only to some companies or people, and not to others. It is a general statement of what causes what, and why.

How Will You Measure Your Life? by Clayton M. Christensen, James Allworth, and Karen Dillon

8

Good theory can help us categorize, explain, and, most important, predict.

How Will You Measure Your Life? by Clayton M. Christensen, James Allworth, and Karen Dillon

9

People often think that the best way to predict the future is by collecting as much data as possible before making a decision. But this is like driving a car looking only at the rearview mirror—because data is only available about the past.

How Will You Measure Your Life? by Clayton M. Christensen, James Allworth, and Karen Dillon

10

This is why theory can be so valuable: it can explain what will happen, even before you experience it.

How Will You Measure Your Life? by Clayton M. Christensen, James Allworth, and Karen Dillon

11

That’s a hallmark of good theory: it dispenses its advice in “if-then” statements.

How Will You Measure Your Life? by Clayton M. Christensen, James Allworth, and Karen Dillon

12

You’ll see that without theory, we’re at sea without a sextant.

How Will You Measure Your Life? by Clayton M. Christensen, James Allworth, and Karen Dillon

13

You should learn all that you can from the past; from scholars who have studied it, and from people who have gone through problems of the sort that you are likely to face. But this doesn’t solve the fundamental challenge of what information and what advice you should accept, and which you should ignore as you embark into the future.

How Will You Measure Your Life? by Clayton M. Christensen, James Allworth, and Karen Dillon

14

The only way to be truly satisfied is to do what you believe is great work. And the only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven’t found it yet, keep looking. Don’t settle. As with all matters of the heart, you’ll know when you find it. —Steve Jobs

How Will You Measure Your Life? by Clayton M. Christensen, James Allworth, and Karen Dillon

15

The problem is that what we think matters most in our jobs often does not align with what will really make us happy.

How Will You Measure Your Life? by Clayton M. Christensen, James Allworth, and Karen Dillon

16

Drawing on our research, I will explain what the best circumstances are to be deliberate, to have that plan; and when it’s best to be emergent—to be open to the unexpected.

How Will You Measure Your Life? by Clayton M. Christensen, James Allworth, and Karen Dillon

17

a problem known as agency theory, or incentive theory: why don’t managers always behave in a way that is in the best interest of shareholders? The root cause, as Jensen and Meckling saw it, is that people work in accordance with how you pay them. The takeaway was that you have to align the interests of executives with the interests of shareholders.

How Will You Measure Your Life? by Clayton M. Christensen, James Allworth, and Karen Dillon

18

One of the best ways to probe whether you can trust the advice that a theory is offering you is to look for anomalies—something that the theory cannot explain.

How Will You Measure Your Life? by Clayton M. Christensen, James Allworth, and Karen Dillon

19

a second school of thought—often called two-factor theory, or motivation theory—that turns the incentive theory on its head. It acknowledges that you can pay people to want what you want—over and over again. But incentives are not the same as motivation. True motivation is getting people to do something because they want to do it. This type of motivation continues, in good times and in bad.

How Will You Measure Your Life? by Clayton M. Christensen, James Allworth, and Karen Dillon

20

Frederick Herzberg, probably one of the most incisive writers on the topic of motivation theory,

How Will You Measure Your Life? by Clayton M. Christensen, James Allworth, and Karen Dillon

21

Instead, satisfaction and dissatisfaction are separate, independent measures. This means, for example, that it’s possible to love your job and hate it at the same time.

How Will You Measure Your Life? by Clayton M. Christensen, James Allworth, and Karen Dillon

22

On one side of the equation, there are the elements of work that, if not done right, will cause us to be dissatisfied. These are called hygiene factors. Hygiene factors are things like status, compensation, job security, work conditions, company policies, and supervisory practices.

How Will You Measure Your Life? by Clayton M. Christensen, James Allworth, and Karen Dillon

23

Herzberg asserts that compensation is a hygiene factor, not a motivator.

How Will You Measure Your Life? by Clayton M. Christensen, James Allworth, and Karen Dillon

24

Compensation is a hygiene factor. You need to get it right. But all you can aspire to is that employees will not be mad at each other and the company because of compensation.

How Will You Measure Your Life? by Clayton M. Christensen, James Allworth, and Karen Dillon

25

if you instantly improve the hygiene factors of your job, you’re not going to suddenly love it. At best, you just won’t hate it anymore. The opposite of job dissatisfaction isn’t job satisfaction, but rather an absence of job dissatisfaction.

How Will You Measure Your Life? by Clayton M. Christensen, James Allworth, and Karen Dillon

26

the factors that will cause us to love our jobs? These are what Herzberg’s research calls motivators. Motivation factors include challenging work, recognition, responsibility, and personal growth.

How Will You Measure Your Life? by Clayton M. Christensen, James Allworth, and Karen Dillon

27

intrinsic conditions of the work itself. Motivation is much less about external prodding or stimulation, and much more about what’s inside of you, and inside of your work.

How Will You Measure Your Life? by Clayton M. Christensen, James Allworth, and Karen Dillon

28

Many of my peers had chosen careers using hygiene factors as the primary criteria; income was often the most important of these.

How Will You Measure Your Life? by Clayton M. Christensen, James Allworth, and Karen Dillon

29

they found themselves stuck. They’d managed to expand their lifestyle to fit the salaries they were bringing in, and it was really difficult to wind that back. They’d made choices early on because of the hygiene factors, not true motivators, and they couldn’t find their way out of that trap.

How Will You Measure Your Life? by Clayton M. Christensen, James Allworth, and Karen Dillon

30

The point isn’t that money is the root cause of professional unhappiness. It’s not. The problems start occurring when it becomes the priority over all else, when hygiene factors are satisfied but the quest remains only to make more money.

How Will You Measure Your Life? by Clayton M. Christensen, James Allworth, and Karen Dillon

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