Book More Business: Make Money Speaking by Lois Creamer Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Book More Business: Make Money Speaking by Lois Creamer Deck (94)
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1

The speaking business is 97 percent selling and three percent speaking on the platform. This is why I suggest you think of yourself not as a speaker, but as purveyor of intellectual property.

Book More Business: Make Money Speaking by @LoisCreamer

2

Repurposing intellectual property into several different vehicles is the key to success. Speaking, writing, recording, training, webinars—these

Book More Business: Make Money Speaking by @LoisCreamer

3

Don’t say you’re a motivational speaker. If you want to use the word say, “I’m a high-content speaker who is motivational/inspirational in style and tone.”

Book More Business: Make Money Speaking by @LoisCreamer

4

Don’t use the phrase “free speech.” Instead, use the term “waive my fee,”

Book More Business: Make Money Speaking by @LoisCreamer

5

Once you have a positioning statement, everything else—all content—must be congruent with that statement.

Book More Business: Make Money Speaking by @LoisCreamer

6

Being a generalist used to be a great thing. In fact, many newer speakers still think it’s a great thing. I hate to report the bad news, but that idea is so last century. The market is now seeking out experts. Speakers and consultants who go deep into one particular area instead of many are the ones in demand.

Book More Business: Make Money Speaking by @LoisCreamer

7

Companies seeking speakers who are generalists now typically hire training companies to come in and present, and they typically handle it through their HR departments. They are also used to paying lower fees for this type of training. I strongly suggest that you never go through HR seeking a decision-maker.

Book More Business: Make Money Speaking by @LoisCreamer

8

If you are a professional speaker and have expertise in one area, you go to executive-level people to get hired, never human resources!

Book More Business: Make Money Speaking by @LoisCreamer

9

Never call yourself a trainer. Sadly, trainers are underpaid in the marketplace.

Book More Business: Make Money Speaking by @LoisCreamer

10

A public speaker is someone who speaks occasionally and typically does not receive a fee—perhaps an honorarium, but not a fee. (I don’t consider

Book More Business: Make Money Speaking by @LoisCreamer

11

A professional speaker is someone who speaks for a fee and does so as part of the way they make a living. The key here is that professional speaking is a fee-based activity where fees are received on a consistent basis.

Book More Business: Make Money Speaking by @LoisCreamer

12

If you want to be highly successful in the speaking industry, you need to know what industries and markets are a good fit for your information. Who values and needs your information—and has historically paid for similar information?

Book More Business: Make Money Speaking by @LoisCreamer

13

Marketing to state-level associations may be a little easier because most have meetings every month, although many take off summer and holiday months.

Book More Business: Make Money Speaking by @LoisCreamer

14

When approaching state-level associations, ask for the executive director. Is he or she the decision-maker? Sometimes. If not, he or she will know who you should talk to.

Book More Business: Make Money Speaking by @LoisCreamer

15

State-level associations pay less than national-level groups. Many speakers who wouldn’t fit at the local level need to move directly to the national level.

Book More Business: Make Money Speaking by @LoisCreamer

16

When seeking out opportunities on the national level, you will rarely get a chance to speak to a decision-maker. When contacting them, ask for the meeting planner. Note: The meeting planner will not be the decision-maker, but he or she will be a person of influence.

Book More Business: Make Money Speaking by @LoisCreamer

17

The meeting planner is the person who will ensure that your materials get on the table—in other words, considered for the meeting. Typically, on the national level, the decision is made by a volunteer committee of association members, members who you will never be able to contact.

Book More Business: Make Money Speaking by @LoisCreamer

18

Anytime you see two companies merging (and it’s happening more and more), that could be a great opportunity for you.

Book More Business: Make Money Speaking by @LoisCreamer

19

Offer a package of services: Do a speech on your subject. Combine it with a consulting package where you work with specific groups within the organization to make sure things go smoothly.

Book More Business: Make Money Speaking by @LoisCreamer

20

Look for the “letter from the CEO”

Book More Business: Make Money Speaking by @LoisCreamer

21

These letters outline every challenge, key concern, and pitfall the company is facing in the coming year. It also lists the things they celebrate. We are concerned about all of these!

Book More Business: Make Money Speaking by @LoisCreamer

22

Marketing to your local convention and visitors bureau or commission.

Book More Business: Make Money Speaking by @LoisCreamer

23

The convention calendar. It is a beautiful thing! It lists all companies, associations, and organizations coming into that city to meet, when they will be meeting, how many will be attending, where the meeting will take place, and even who the contact person is. (Don’t get excited by the contact name. It’s never the person to call.)

Book More Business: Make Money Speaking by @LoisCreamer

24

Look at meetings that have at least, say, 75 people attending.

Book More Business: Make Money Speaking by @LoisCreamer

25

“I see you’re coming to my hometown for a meeting. I’m a professional speaker who [insert positioning statement I helped you create here]. I live here, and you’ll love meeting here! If my program would be a fit, realize there would be no associated travel expenses. If there is bad weather, it won’t affect me being there on time. If I’m not a fit, keep my information handy in case you have a cancellation. If I’m not booked, I can be there fast!”

Book More Business: Make Money Speaking by @LoisCreamer

26

How can I get a bureau to book me? My short answer is …. you probably can’t do it on your own. Use your energy toward getting your own bookings. Bureaus are interested in working with “working” speakers—speakers

Book More Business: Make Money Speaking by @LoisCreamer

27

Some bureaus host “speaker showcases” where they invite speakers to do 15 to 20 minutes of their best stuff in front of bureau clients and representatives. Some charge for this; some do not.

Book More Business: Make Money Speaking by @LoisCreamer

28

“bureau-friendly” marketing materials for them. This simply means that your contact information should not appear on the materials. The bureau wants the client to contact them, not you. You will need to make your documents bureau-friendly.

Book More Business: Make Money Speaking by @LoisCreamer

29

The whole “bureau-friendly” thing is a dated concept, and I’ve encouraged bureaus to drop it.

Book More Business: Make Money Speaking by @LoisCreamer

30

Bureaus ask for a percentage of your speaking fee as payment for getting you the engagement; the current average is 30 percent.

Book More Business: Make Money Speaking by @LoisCreamer

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