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1

They said she was “timid and shy” but had “the courage of a lion.” 215

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain

2

Depending on which study you consult, one third to one half of Americans are introverts—in other words, one out of every two or three people you know. 239

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain

3

If you’re not an introvert yourself, you are surely raising, managing, married to, or coupled with one. 241

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain

4

Velocity of speech counts as well as volume: we rank fast talkers as more competent and likable than slow ones. 258

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain

5

research shows that the voluble are considered smarter than the reticent—even though there’s zero correlation between the gift of gab and good ideas. 259

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain

6

“I’ve never seen anyone so nice and so tough at the same time,” 345

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain

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in 1921 the influential psychologist Carl Jung had published a bombshell of a book, Psychological Types, popularizing the terms introvert and extrovert as the central building blocks of personality. 354

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain

8

Introverts are drawn to the inner world of thought and feeling, said Jung, extroverts to the external life of people and activities. Introverts focus on the meaning they make of the events swirling around them; extroverts plunge into the events themselves. Introverts recharge their batteries by being alone; extroverts need to recharge when they don’t socialize enough. 355

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain

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introverts and extroverts differ in the level of outside stimulation that they need to function well. 366

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain

10

One of the most humane phrases in the English language—“Only connect!”—was written by the distinctly introverted E. M. Forster in a novel exploring the question of how to achieve “human love at its height.” 384

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain

11

Shyness is inherently painful; introversion is not. 387

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain

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the shy person is afraid to speak up, while the introvert is simply overstimulated—but 398

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain

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(Finland is a famously introverted nation. Finnish joke: How can you tell if a Finn likes you? He’s staring at your shoes instead of his own.) 433

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain

14

Dale’s last name is Carnegie (Carnagey, actually; he changes the spelling later, likely to evoke Andrew, the great industrialist). 490

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain

15

Carnegie holds his first class at a YMCA night school on 125th Street in New York City. 492

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain

16

The word personality didn’t exist in English until the eighteenth century, and the idea of “having a good personality” was not widespread until the twentieth. 505

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain

17

In 1790, only 3 percent of Americans lived in cities; in 1840, only 8 percent did; by 1920, more than a third of the country were urbanites. “We cannot all live in cities,” wrote the news editor Horace Greeley in 1867, “yet nearly all seem determined to do so.” 513

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain

18

the new personality-driven ads cast consumers as performers with stage fright from which only the advertiser’s product might rescue them. These ads focused obsessively on the hostile glare of the public spotlight. “ALL AROUND YOU PEOPLE ARE JUDGING YOU SILENTLY,” warned a 1922 ad for Woodbury’s soap. 552

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain

19

Men who were too quiet around women risked being thought gay; as a popular 1926 sex guide observed, “homosexuals are invariably timid, shy, retiring.” 577

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain

20

1940s that Harvard should reject the “sensitive, neurotic” type and the “intellectually over-stimulated” in favor of boys of the “healthy extrovert kind.” In 1950, Yale’s president, Alfred Whitney Griswold, declared that the ideal Yalie was not a “beetle-browed, highly specialized intellectual, but a well-rounded man.” 618

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain

21

the fastest-selling pharmaceutical in American history, according to the social historian Andrea Tone. By 1956 one of every twenty Americans had tried it; by 1960 a third of all prescriptions from U.S. doctors were for Miltown or a similar drug called Equanil. 639

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain

22

“John Quincy Adams who can write / And Andrew Jackson who can fight.” The victor of that campaign? The fighter beat the writer, 659

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain

23

but everything about him is an exercise in superiority, from the way he occasionally addresses the audience as “girls and boys,” 824

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain

24

throughout the seminar, he constantly tries to “upsell” us. 840

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain

25

But the thing about Tony—and what draws people to buy his products—is that like any good salesman, he believes in what he’s pitching. 853

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain

26

We see salesmanship as a way of sharing one’s gifts with the world. This is why Tony’s zeal to sell to and be adulated by thousands of people at once is seen not as narcissism or hucksterism, but as leadership of the highest order. 862

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain

27

If Abraham Lincoln was the embodiment of virtue during the Culture of Character, then Tony Robbins is his counterpart during the Culture of Personality. 864

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain

28

an HBS grad, once called the place the “Spiritual Capital of Extroversion.” 886

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain

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The essence of the HBS education is that leaders have to act confidently and make decisions in the face of incomplete information. 916

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain

30

“If you’re preparing alone for class, then you’re doing it wrong. Nothing at HBS is intended to be done alone.” 941

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain

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