To Sell Is Human by Daniel Pink Flashcards Preview

Book Notes > To Sell Is Human by Daniel Pink > Flashcards

Flashcards in To Sell Is Human by Daniel Pink Deck (213)
Loading flashcards...
1

In the United States alone, some 1 in 9 workers still earns a living trying to get others to make a purchase.

To Sell Is Human by @DanielPink

2

“non-sales selling.”

To Sell Is Human by @DanielPink

3

If you buy these arguments, or if you’re willing just to rent them for a few

To Sell Is Human by @DanielPink

4

One adage of the sales trade has long been ABC—“Always Be Closing.” The three chapters of Part Two introduce the new ABCs—Attunement, Buoyancy, and Clarity.

To Sell Is Human by @DanielPink

5

I draw on a rich reservoir of research to show you the three rules of attunement—and why extraverts rarely make the best salespeople.

To Sell Is Human by @DanielPink

6

the Fuller Man became a fixture in popular culture—Lady

To Sell Is Human by @DanielPink

7

One out of every nine American workers works in sales. Each day more than fifteen million people earn their keep by trying to convince someone else to make a purchase.7

To Sell Is Human by @DanielPink

8

The United States manufacturing economy, still the largest in the world, cranks out nearly $2 trillion worth of goods each year.

To Sell Is Human by @DanielPink

9

37 percent of respondents said they devoted a significant amount of time to “teaching, coaching, or instructing others.”

To Sell Is Human by @DanielPink

10

70 percent reported that they spent at least some of their time “persuading or convincing others.” What’s more, non-sales selling turned out to be far more prevalent than selling in the traditional sense. When we asked how much time they put in “selling a product or service,” about half of respondents said “no time at all.”

To Sell Is Human by @DanielPink

11

striking interplay between what people find valuable and what they actually do.

To Sell Is Human by @DanielPink

12

why more of us find ourselves in sales: the rise of small entrepreneurs.

To Sell Is Human by @DanielPink

13

The U.S. Census Bureau estimates that the American economy has more than twenty-one million “non-employer” businesses—operations without any paid employees. These include everything from electricians to computer consultants to graphic designers.

To Sell Is Human by @DanielPink

14

middle-class employment of the future won’t be employees of large organizations, but self-sufficient “artisans.”

To Sell Is Human by @DanielPink

15

In just three years, Kickstarter surpassed the U.S. National Endowment for the Arts as the largest backer of arts projects in the United States.9

To Sell Is Human by @DanielPink

16

MIT’s Technology Review, “In 1982, there were 4.6 billion people in the world, and not a single mobile-phone subscriber. Today, there are seven billion people in the world—and six billion mobile cellular-phone subscriptions.”12 Cisco predicts that by 2016, the world will have more smartphones (again, handheld minicomputers) than human beings—ten billion in all.13

To Sell Is Human by @DanielPink

17

“We have no salespeople,” he told me, “because in a weird way, everyone is a salesperson.”

To Sell Is Human by @DanielPink

18

“We try to espouse the philosophy that everyone the customer touches is effectively a salesperson,”

To Sell Is Human by @DanielPink

19

Irritation, he says, is “challenging people to do something that we want them to do.” By contrast, “agitation is challenging them to do something that they want to do.” What he has discovered throughout his career is that “irritation doesn’t work.” It might be effective in the short term.

To Sell Is Human by @DanielPink

20

“The model of health care is ‘We’re the experts.’ We go in and tell you what to do.” But she has found, and both experience and evidence confirm, that this approach has its limits. “We need to take a step back and bring [patients] on board,” she told me. “People usually know themselves way better than I do.” So now, in order to move people to move themselves, she tells them, “I need your expertise.” Patients heal faster and better when they’re part of the moving process.

To Sell Is Human by @DanielPink

21

And the emotions elicited by “sales” or “selling” carry an unmistakable flavor. Of the twenty-five most offered words, only five have a positive valence

To Sell Is Human by @DanielPink

22

caveat emptor—buyer beware.

To Sell Is Human by @DanielPink

23

The belief that sales is slimy, slick, and sleazy has less to do with the nature of the activity itself than with the long-reigning but fast-fading conditions in which selling has often taken place. The balance has shifted. If you’re a buyer and you’ve got just as much information as the seller,

To Sell Is Human by @DanielPink

24

His book, How to Sell Anything to Anybody—whose

To Sell Is Human by @DanielPink

25

“Girard’s Rule of 250”—that each of us has 250 people in our lives we know well enough to invite to a wedding or a funeral. If you reach one person, and get her to like you and buy from you, she will connect you to others in her 250-person circle.

To Sell Is Human by @DanielPink

26

“A Chevrolet sold by Joe Girard is not just a car,” he writes. “It is a whole relationship between me and the customer and his family and friends and the people he works with.”5

To Sell Is Human by @DanielPink

27

when do you think you might start looking at a new car?” I ask the question straight out, and he is going to think about it and give me an answer. Maybe he only wants to get rid of me. But whatever the reason what he says is probably going to be what he really means. It’s easier than trying to dream up a lie.

To Sell Is Human by @DanielPink

28

“People want a fair deal from someone they like.”

To Sell Is Human by @DanielPink

29

When buyers can know more than sellers, sellers are no longer protectors and purveyors of information. They’re the curators and clarifiers of it—helping to make sense of the blizzard of facts, data, and options.

To Sell Is Human by @DanielPink

30

When the product is complicated—credit default swaps, anyone?—and the potential for lucre enormous, some people will strive to maintain information imbalances and others will opt for outright deception. That won’t change. As long as flawed and fallible human beings walk the planet, caveat emptor remains useful guidance. I heed this principle. So should you.

To Sell Is Human by @DanielPink

Decks in Book Notes Class (88):