Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead by Sheryl Sandberg Flashcards Preview

Book Notes > Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead by Sheryl Sandberg > Flashcards

Flashcards in Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead by Sheryl Sandberg Deck (170)
Loading flashcards...
1

In 1947, Anita Summers, the mother of my longtime mentor Larry Summers, was hired as an economist by the Standard Oil Company. When she accepted the job, her new boss said to her, “I am so glad to have you. I figure I am getting the same brains for less money.” Her reaction to this was to feel flattered. It was a huge compliment to be told that she had the same brains as a man. It would have been unthinkable for her to ask for equal compensation.

Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead by Sheryl Sandberg

2

But knowing that things could be worse should not stop us from trying to make them better.

Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead by Sheryl Sandberg

3

While women continue to outpace men in educational achievement, we have ceased making real progress at the top of any industry.

Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead by Sheryl Sandberg

4

I saw that the senior leaders were almost entirely male, but I thought that was due to historical discrimination against women. The proverbial glass ceiling had been cracked in almost every industry, and I believed that it was just a matter of time until my generation took our fair share of the leadership roles. But with each passing year, fewer and fewer of my colleagues were women. More and more often, I was the only woman in the room.

Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead by Sheryl Sandberg

5

It is time for us to face the fact that our revolution has stalled.12 The promise of equality is not the same as true equality.

Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead by Sheryl Sandberg

6

A truly equal world would be one where women ran half our countries and companies and men ran half our homes.

Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead by Sheryl Sandberg

7

Conditions for all women will improve when there are more women in leadership roles giving strong and powerful voice to their needs and concerns.

Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead by Sheryl Sandberg

8

A 2011 McKinsey report noted that men are promoted based on potential, while women are promoted based on past accomplishments.

Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead by Sheryl Sandberg

9

My argument is that getting rid of these internal barriers is critical to gaining power. Others have argued that women can get to the top only when the institutional barriers are gone. This is the ultimate chicken-and-egg situation.

Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead by Sheryl Sandberg

10

I am writing it for any woman who wants to increase her chances of making it to the top of her field or pursue any goal vigorously.

Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead by Sheryl Sandberg

11

If we can succeed in adding more female voices at the highest levels, we will expand opportunities and extend fairer treatment to all.

Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead by Sheryl Sandberg

12

What Would You Do If You Weren’t Afraid?

Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead by Sheryl Sandberg

13

Despite my athletic shortcomings, I was raised to believe that girls could do anything boys could do and that all career paths were open to me.

Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead by Sheryl Sandberg

14

In comparison to their male counterparts, highly trained women are scaling back and dropping out of the workforce in high numbers.1 In turn, these diverging percentages teach institutions and mentors to invest more in men, who are statistically more likely to stay.

Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead by Sheryl Sandberg

15

During the same years that our careers demanded maximum time investment, our biology demanded that we have children. Our partners did not share the housework and child rearing, so we found ourselves with two full-time jobs.

Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead by Sheryl Sandberg

16

But while compliant, raise-your-hand-and-speak-when-called-on behaviors might be rewarded in school, they are less valued in the workplace.

Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead by Sheryl Sandberg

17

data clearly indicate that in field after field, more men than women aspire to the most senior jobs.

Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead by Sheryl Sandberg

18

Although this is an improvement, even among this demographic, the leadership ambition gap remains. Millennial women are less likely than Millennial men to agree that the statement “I aspire to a leadership role in whatever field I ultimately work” describes them very well.

Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead by Sheryl Sandberg

19

Millennial women were also less likely than their male peers to characterize themselves as “leaders,” “visionaries,” “self-confident,” and “willing to take risks.”

Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead by Sheryl Sandberg

20

Professional ambition is expected of men but is optional—or worse, sometimes even a negative—for women.

Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead by Sheryl Sandberg

21

leadership is largely a culturally created and reinforced trait.

Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead by Sheryl Sandberg

22

From the moment we are born, boys and girls are treated differently.19 Parents tend to talk to girl babies more than boy babies.20 Mothers overestimate the crawling ability of their sons and underestimate the crawling ability of their daughters.21 Reflecting the belief that girls need to be helped more than boys, mothers often spend more time comforting and hugging infant girls and more time watching infant boys play by themselves.

Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead by Sheryl Sandberg

23

The gender stereotypes introduced in childhood are reinforced throughout our lives and become self-fulfilling prophesies.

Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead by Sheryl Sandberg

24

a social-psychological phenomenon called “stereotype threat.” Social scientists have observed that when members of a group are made aware of a negative stereotype, they are more likely to perform according to that stereotype.

Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead by Sheryl Sandberg

25

Our country lags considerably behind others in efforts to help parents take care of their children and stay in the workforce. Of all the industrialized nations in the world, the United States is the only one without a paid maternity leave policy.

Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead by Sheryl Sandberg

26

sharing financial and child-care responsibilities leads to less guilty moms, more involved dads, and thriving children.

Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead by Sheryl Sandberg

27

the holy trinity of fear: the fear of being a bad mother/wife/daughter.

Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead by Sheryl Sandberg

28

What would I do if I weren’t afraid? And then go do it.

Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead by Sheryl Sandberg

29

I realized that in addition to facing institutional obstacles, women face a battle from within.

Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead by Sheryl Sandberg

30

many people, but especially women, feel fraudulent when they are praised for their accomplishments. Instead of feeling worthy of recognition, they feel undeserving and guilty, as if a mistake has been made.

Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead by Sheryl Sandberg

Decks in Book Notes Class (88):