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Flashcards in Commitment Deck (77)
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1
Q

Commitment (long and short definitions).

A

The intention to maintain a relationship over time. More simply, “us” with a future.

2
Q

Commitment is thought of as the ___ to give up other ___.

A

Choice, choices.

3
Q

Who studied commitment?

A

Scott Stanley et al.

4
Q

Dedication

A

All the forces that increase the desire to maintain a relationship.

5
Q

Constraint

A

All of the forces that make it more difficult to end a relationship.

6
Q

Dedication is the ___ ___ in commitment.

A

“Want to.”

7
Q

Constraint is the ___ ___ in commitment.

A

“Have to.”

8
Q

Dedication is more closely associated with ___ and constraint relates more to ___ in relationships.

A

Satisfaction, stability.

9
Q

Examples of dedication.

A

Wanting to share the future together, the sex is good, having a couple identity, willingness to sacrifice for the partner and the relationship, love.

10
Q

Examples of constraint.

A

Family expects you to stay together, shared identity, religious beliefs against divorce, having a pet together.

11
Q

Perceived Constraints

A

Internal or external forces that encourage partners to stay together.

12
Q

What are some perceived constraints?

A

Social pressure, the sense that you have made substantial investments that would be lost, ending a relationship would be difficult, lacking better alternatives (subjective).

13
Q

Material Constraints

A

Specific, tangible resources couples share.

14
Q

What are some material constraints?

A

Having a lease, sharing debt, buying furniture, having a pet, planned for a future vacation (objective).

15
Q

Commitment theory is a sub-theory of ___ ___ theory.

A

Social exchange.

16
Q

Felt Constraint

A

Sense of feeling trapped in a relationship - “I would leave my partner if it wasn’t so difficult to do so.”

17
Q

___ constraint is the only aspect of constraint that predicts relationship dissolution.

A

Felt.

18
Q

___ constraint also predicts being in a relationship with physical violence.

A

Felt.

19
Q

___ is what gets us to commit, ___ keep us there.

A

Dedication, constraints.

20
Q

What are the two aspects of commitment?

A

Dedication, constraints.

21
Q

What is the most important function of commitment?

A

Both.

22
Q

Constraint is/isn’t a negative thing.

A

Constraint does not have to be a negative thing.

23
Q

Constraint is ___ as relationships progress.

A

Unavoidable.

24
Q

Constraints don’t feel constraining until ___ with the relationship is low.

A

Satisfaction.

25
Q

Constraints help explain why ___ quality relationships persist.

A

Low.

26
Q

Constraints stabilize ___ quality relationships that have periods of unhappiness.

A

High.

27
Q

Being committed to a relationship has a drastic impact on relationship ___ behaviours.

A

Maintenance.

28
Q

Professor Johnson attends ballets because it provides ___ ___ benefit.

A

Long term.

29
Q

More commitment leads to more…

A

Sacrifices, satisfaction with sacrifices, and willingness to sacrifice.

30
Q

Satisfaction with ___ is one of the strongest predictors of future relationship satisfaction.

A

Sacrifice.

31
Q

___ signals commitment.

A

Sacrifice.

32
Q

___ are more likely to view sacrifice for a partner to be harmful to them.

A

Men.

33
Q

What is the central function of commitment?

A

Formation of romantic relationships.

34
Q

Commitment allows us to ___ ___ ___.

A

Secure romantic attachment.

35
Q

When we think about what we could lose with a person, we get anxious. To resolve this anxiety by ___.

A

Commitment.

36
Q

What is the highest level of commitment in western societies?

A

Marriage.

37
Q

In order for commitment to serve its purpose of securing romantic attachment, to must ___ in both partners and be ___ between the partners.

A

Exist, communicated.

38
Q

One’s personal dedication to a partner will lead to ___ that signal commitment.

A

Behaviours.

39
Q

Give examples of emblems of commitment.

A

Spending time together, going on dates, gifts, flowers, chocolates, etc.

40
Q

There are culturally endorsed emblems of commitment that have stronger ___ ___.

A

Signal power.

41
Q

Give examples of strong culturally endorsed emblems of commitment.

A

Wearing another’s class ring, being “pinned,” sharing letter jackets.

42
Q

Today, there are ___ emblems of commitment.

A

Fewer.

43
Q

Give an example of a emblem of commitment in today’s society.

A

Engagement rings (although they are on the decline).

44
Q

Emblems are important because they show not just your partner, but…

A

Also everyone else that you are in a relationship.

45
Q

Fewer emblems mean that there is ___ ___ of commitment levels from each partner.

A

Greater miscommunication.

46
Q

What social practices lead to greater miscommunication of commitment levels?

A

Hooking up and cohabitation.

47
Q

Fewer emblems mean that ___ are not sent out that one is in a relationship.

A

Signals.

48
Q

There is increased ___ as a result of fewer emblems.

A

Ambiguity.

49
Q

There is a strong perception that ___ are more scared of commitment than ___.

A

Men, women.

50
Q

Who is more committed in a marriage?

A

Men are as committed as women.

51
Q

Men are ___ committed to the idea of marriage than women.

A

More.

52
Q

___ derive more benefits from marriage.

A

Men.

53
Q

___ commit and start sacrificing earlier in relationships.

A

Women.

54
Q

Why do women commit in relationships first?

A
  • Socialization, where women are more attuned to relationships, and invest in them earlier.
  • Biology, where oxytocin impacts women more dramatically than men.
55
Q

When in the middle of overlapping trajectories, who are the losers and why?

A

Women, because there is a large disparity.

56
Q

Men resist commitment because…

A

Of what marriage means to them.

57
Q

What does marriage mean to men?

A
  • Drastic changes in behaviour and responsibility.
  • Greater amount of personal sacrifice.
  • Women don’t report same level of change.
58
Q

Men are more ___ driven and women are more ___ driven.

A

Event, relationally.

59
Q

Women and men view marriage, relationships, and commitment somewhat ___.

A

Differently.

60
Q

Where are the greatest differences in the way men and women vies marriage, relationships, and commitment?

A

Timing and trajectories.

61
Q

People must be ___/___ in their communication of intentions.

A

Clear, intentional.

62
Q

Inertia Theory

A

Romantic relationships have their own form of inertia.

63
Q

According to inertia theory, once in a relationship, this entails being increasingly intertwined in each other’s life. How does this happen typically?

A
  • Casual dating.
  • Exclusive dating.
  • Sex.
  • Live together.
  • Engagement.
  • Marriage.
64
Q

In inertia theory, there is a natural progression of increasing ___.

A

Involvement.

65
Q

As relationships progress, constraints ___ increase, while dedication ___ increase.

A

Will, might.

66
Q

Sliding

A

The combination of inertia and constraints causing people to continue progressing in relationships that would end if it was not so hard to do so.

67
Q

In cohabitation, many cohabiters ___ into marriage not because they want to, but because it is the path of least resistance.

A

Slide.

68
Q

What is the “cohabitation effect?”

A

Getting married because it is the easiest path to take.

69
Q

Is it better to live together then get married, or to live apart then get married?

A

Live apart, as there is no sliding effect. However, if you are engaged first, there is no effect if you live together.

70
Q

Outline a lower risk sequence.

A
  1. Information.
  2. Decision.
  3. Transition.
  4. Inertia & Constraint.
71
Q

Outline a higher risk sequence.

A
  1. Sliding.
  2. Transition.
  3. Interti & Constraint.
  4. Information.
72
Q

Why is sliding so bad?

A

You lose options before making a choice.

73
Q

Healthy commitment involves ___ ___ constraints.

A

Freely chosen.

74
Q

Sliding is bad because it generates ___ before ___ is full developed.

A

Constraints, dedication.

75
Q

What protects us from our feeling constrained?

A

Dedication.

76
Q

The implication of inertia theory is by being intentional and ___ that you want a relationship to progress, rather than ___ into increased involvement.

A

Deciding, sliding.

77
Q

What is the difference between deciding and sliding?

A

Deciding is an active process, while sliding is a passive process.