Socioeconomic Status, Social Support, and Intimate Relationships Flashcards Preview

J - HECOL 210 > Socioeconomic Status, Social Support, and Intimate Relationships > Flashcards

Flashcards in Socioeconomic Status, Social Support, and Intimate Relationships Deck (28)
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1
Q

SES is comprised of 3 things:

A
  • Money.
  • Education.
  • Occupational status.
2
Q

Those of low SES tend to (in relation to relationships)…

A
  • Marry less.
  • Be more likely to divorce.
  • Have higher levels of marital distress.
  • Have children before marriage and have more children.
3
Q

Do the poor care less about marriage?

A

No.

4
Q

Do the poor hold unrealistic standards for marriage?

A

Maybe.

5
Q

Do the poor have worse relationships?

A

No.

6
Q

Poor people’s expectations for the relationships are no different, but low-income people are…

A

More likely to report financial barriers.

7
Q

True or false? Low-income couples report more negative behaviour within their relationship compared to more affluent counterparts.

A

False.

8
Q

What are some explanations why low SES people have more relationship challenges?

A
  • Few resources.
  • Health difficulties.
  • Lower levels of education.
  • Little free time.
9
Q

The challenges faced by low SES people causes…

A

Stress from these problems to spillover to the relationship.

10
Q

What is the prominent approach for helping low-income couples’ intimate relationships?

A

Offering education to teach healthy relationship skills (communication, conflict resolution, etc.).

11
Q

Relationship education was developed for the ___ class.

A

Middle.

12
Q

What is the biggest criticism of relationship enrichment programs?

A

Those who need it most don’t attend.

13
Q

Is teaching healthy relationship skills effective?

A

The effects between those in the intervention and those who aren’t are mixed, and small at best.

14
Q

What did Hawkins say about relationship support?

A
  • Even small effects translate into big savings in terms of reliance on other taxpayer funded sources of support.
  • Most government administered programs have difficulty demonstrating an impact.
15
Q

JobCore

A

Program in the U.S. where those who will not pass high school are sent to trade school and paid. Did not benefit at-risk youth.

16
Q

What does JobCore show?

A

No matter how much money you throw at policy, it may not work.

17
Q

Social Networks

A

Connections to family, friends, neighbours, clubs, or other institutions.

18
Q

When do social networks help?

A

When there is a lot of overlap between partners’ networks, and the members of each person’s social network supports the relationship.

19
Q

How do social networks provide resources?

A

Provide social capital.

20
Q

Social Capital

A

Connections that help you cope with stresses.

21
Q

Shared social networks can make it harder to leave a relationship. This is known as a ___ constraint.

A

Perceived.

22
Q

Shared social networks that ___ of the relationship make it easier to build and foster the relationship.

A

Approve.

23
Q

If social networks ___ of the partner or relationship, this makes the relationship more difficult to sustain.

A

Disapprove.

24
Q

If there is ___ within the network, this makes the relationship more difficult to sustain because support is provided by someone else.

A

Substitutability.

25
Q

Give examples of effects of social networks.

A
  • Opportunity to clarify commitment.

- Access to more alternative partners.

26
Q

Relationships are embedded in a ___.

A

Context.

27
Q

Context can be beneficial when:

A
  • The couple has many resources.
  • High SES.
  • Approving and overlapping social network.
28
Q

Context can be harmful when:

A
  • The couple faces many stressors.
  • Low SES.
  • Independent or disapproving social networks.