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Flashcards in Vocabulary for Exam 4- MORS 113 Deck (175):
1

Method of drainage in which the drainage is stopped at intervals while the injection continues. A type of restricted drainage.

Intermittent Drainage

2

Substances that bind metallic ions such as EDTA (ethylenediarnine- tetracetic acid) used as an anticoagulant in embalming solutions.

Chelate

3

A chemical capable of drying tissues by searing, caustic.

Cauterizing Agent

4

Abnormal accumulation of cerebrospinal fluids in the ventricles of the brain.

Hydrocephalus

5

Disease characterized by a rash, for example, measles.

Exanthematous Disease

6

Mucous membrane that lines the eyelid and covers the white portion of the eye.

Conjunctiva

7

Occurs when the arterial supply to an area of the body is increased.

Active Capillary Congestion

8

Abnormal accumulation of fluids in a saclike structure, especially the scrotal sac.

Hydrocele

9

Sloughing off of the epidermis, wherein there is a separation of the epidermis from the underlying dermis.

Desquamation (Skin Slip)

10

Water loving.

Hydrophilic

11

The movement of blood from the heart and arteries into the capillaries and veins, which occurs at the moment of death.

Articulo-Mortis

12

An organic catalyst produced by living cells and capable of autolytic decomposition.

Enzymes

13

Biological agent or condition that constitutes a hazard to humans.

Biohazard

14

The red respiratory portion of the red blood cells; iron containing pigment of red blood cells functioning to carry oxygen to the cells.

Hemoglobin

15

Any abnormal color in or upon the human body.

Discoloration

16

Antemortem discolorations resulting from the administration of drugs or chemotherapeutic agents.

Drug Discoloration

17

Loss of blood to the point where life can no longer be sustained.

Exsanguination

18

Chemicals added to embalming solution to deal with varying demands predicted upon the embalming fluid to be used, type of embalming and the environment.

Modifying Agents

19

Liquid product of inflammation containing various proteins and leukocytes.

Pus

20

Method of drainage in which drainage occurs continuously during vascular (arterial) injection.

Concurrent Drainage (Continuous Drainage)

21

Those resulting from an acute inflammation of the skin and blisters.

Second Degree Burn

22

A thin vesicle on the skin containing liquid matter.

Blister

23

Extravascular movement of preservative fluids by gravitational force to the dependent areas of the body.

Gravity Filtration

24

An amorphous, nonvolatile solid or soft side substance, a natural exudation from plants. Any of a class of solid or soft organic compounds of natural or synthetic origin.

Resinous Substance

25

The process of taking in, as in a colored object which takes in certain rays of light and reflects other rays giving the object its recognizable color.

Absorption

26

A specific antibody acting destructively upon cells and tissues.

Lysin

27

The mixture of arterial (vascular) fluid and water which is used for the arterial injection and may include supplemental fluids.

Arterial Solution

28

The movement of the arterial solution through the capillaries into the intercellular spaces, from an intravascular to an extravascular position.

Diffusion Fluid

29

Glycoprotein substance developed by the body in response to, and interacting specifically with, an antigen.

Antibody (Immunoglobin)

30

A diminished, or lowered, coagulability of blood.

Hypinosis

31

Characterized by high fever, causing dehydration of the body.

Febrile

32

Embalming fluid that contains dyes and coloring agents intended to restore a more natural skin tone through the embalming process.

Cosmetic Fluid (Active Dyes)

33

The concentrated, preservative, embalming chemical that will be diluted with water to form the arterial solution for injection into the arterial system during vascular embalming. The purpose is for inactivating saprophytic bacteria and rendering the body tissues less susceptible to decomposition.

Arterial Fluid (Vascular Fluid)

34

An agent employed in the preparation of tissues for the purpose of maintaining the existing form of the structure. Many agents are used, the most important one being formalin.

Fixative

35

Circumscribed inflammation of the skin and deeper tissues that ends in suppuration and is accompanied by systemic symptoms, such a fever or leukocytosis; Several communicating boils of the skin and subcutaneous tissues with the production and discharge of pus and dead tissue.

Carbuncle

36

A hallow place or area.

Cavity

37

The process of converting soluble protein into insoluble protein by heating or contact with a chemical such as alcohol or an aldehyde. The solidification of a solid into a gelatinous mass.

Coagulation

38

The property of certain cells of becoming fluid when shaken, and then becoming solid again.

Thixotropy

39

Transparent part of the tunic of the eyeball that covers the iris and pupil and admits light into the interior.

Cornea

40

Excessive leanness; a wasted condition resulting in sunken surfaces of the face.

Emaciation

41

Within a cell or cells.

Intracellular

42

A state of being twisted or pushed out of natural shape or position.

Distortion

43

The formation of cavities in an organ or tissue; frequently seen in some forms of tuberculosis.

Cavitation

44

To force a fluid through (an organ or tissue), especially by way of the blood vessels; injection during vascular (arterial) embalming.

Perfusion

45

The passage of solvent from a solution of lesser to one of greater solute concentration when the two solutions are separated b a semipermeable membrane.

Osmosis (Hindered Diffusion)

46

Accumulation of serous fluids in the peritoneal cavity.

Ascites

47

Group of chemicals used in addition to vascular (arterial) and cavity embalming fluids; includes but is not limited to hardening compounds, preservative powders, sealing agents, mold preventative agents, and pack application agents.

Accessory Chemicals

48

An organic compound containing nitrogen; any compounds formed from ammonia by replacement of one or more hydrogen atoms by organic radicals. The general formula for the primary is R-NH2.

Amine

49

Antemortem necrosis in a wound infected by an anaerobic gas forming bacillus, the most common etiologic agent being Clostridium perfringens.

Gas Gangrene

50

Loss of moisture from the body tissue which may occur antemortem or postmortem (antemortem febrile disease, diarrhea or emesis, postmortem injection or embalming solution or through absorption of air).

Dehydration

51

A vascular incision made on vessels by cutting in an oblique or slanting direction.

Diagonal Incision

52

Unchecked putrefaction eventually results in a complete breakdown and disappearance of all body structures, except the bones.

Disintegration

53

An organism that prefers an oxygen environment but is capable of living and growing in its absence.

Facultative Anaerobe

54

Blood present in vomitus; vomiting of blood from the stomach.

Hematemesis

55

Conditions characterized by excessive concentrations of bilirubin in the skin and tissues and deposition of excessive bile pigment in the skin, cornea, body fluids, and mucous membranes with the resulting yellow appearance of the patient.

Jaundice (Icterus)

56

Liquid containing dissolved substances.

Solution

57

Method of injection-drainage in which embalming solution is injected and then injection is stopped while drainage is open which is a type of restricted drainage.

Alternate Drainage

58

Combination of iodine and a solubilizing agent or carrier that liberates free iodine in solution; a chemical disinfectant.

Iodophore

59

Discoloration of the body outside the blood vascular system, for example, ecchymosis, petechia, hematoma, and postmortem stain.

Extravascular Blood Discoloration

60

The dome-like superior portion of the cranium; that portion removed during cranial autopsy.

Calvarium

61

The process of seepage or diffusion into tissue of substances that are not ordinarily present.

Infiltration

62

Legal limits established by OSHA to which workers can be exposed continuously for a short period of time without damage or injury. Exposures at this level should not be for more than 15 minutes and not repeated more than 4 times per work day.

Short Term Exposure Limit (STEL)

63

Substance used to kill insect larvae.

Larvicide

64

Rendered thoroughly dry, exhausted of moisture.

Desiccation

65

The increased size of an organ or part due to the excessive but regulated increase in the number of its cells.

Hyperplasia

66

The movement of molecules or other particles in solution from an area of greater concentration to an area of lesser concentration until uniform concentration is reached.

Diffusion

67

The rise in temperature after death due to continued cellular metabolism.

Postmortem Caloricity

68

Chemical in powder form; typically used for surface embalming of the remains.

Preservative Powder

69

A solution containing a relatively large amount of solute.

Concentrated Solution

70

Having an abnormal amount of fat on the body.

Corpulence (Obesity)

71

Drug-induced edema wherein the excess fluid is located within the cell. Upon palpation, there is no noticeable depression.

Solid Edema

72

Occurs when venous drainage from an area is decreased.

Passive Capillary Congestion

73

Inflammation of the peritoneum, the membranous coat lining the abdominal cavity and investing the viscera.

Peritonitis

74

Disease resulting from a deficiency in the secretion of adrenocortical hormones, with "bronze" discoloration of the skin and electrolyte imbalances.

Addison's Disease

75

An organic compound containing one or more -CHO groups. The general formula is R-CHO, where R is a hydrocarbon group or hydrogen.

Aldehyde

76

Abnormal accumulation of fluid in the throacic cavity.

Hydrothroax

77

Building blocks of which proteins are constructed, and the end products of protein digestion or hydrolysis. Their basic formula is NH2-CHR-COOH. An amino group, an alpha carbon, any aliphatic or aromatic radical, and a carboxyl group.

Amino Acid

78

Between the cells of a structure.

Intercellular

79

A swelling or mass of clotted blood confined to an organ or spaced caused by a ruptured blood vessel.

Hematoma

80

Freedom from infection and from any form of life.

Asepsis (Sterility)

81

Having relatively large patches of color somewhat different from the remainder of the coloring.

Blotched

82

The presence of bacteria in the blood.

Bacteremia

83

Absorbing moisture readily.

Hygroscopic

84

Anaerobic, saprophytic, spore-forming bacterium responsible for tissue gas.

Clostridium perfringens (Gas Bacillus, Clostridium Welchii)

85

A blood clot which contains all of the blood elements coagulated in an evenly mixed mass.

Current Clot (Cruor clot, jelly clot)

86

Restorative treatment usually accompanied by aspiration, gravitation, or external pressure to remove gases or excess liquids from tissues; passages are made through the tissues with a scalpel, hypodermic needle, or trocar.

Channeling

87

Severe generalized edema.

Anasarca

88

The term applied to a number of pathological conditions causing a thickening, hardening, and loss of elasticity of the walls of the arteries.

Arteriosclerosis

89

An injury caused by heat which produces redness of the skin.

First Degree Burn (Hyperemia)

90

Agent that has the ability to inhibit or retard bacterial growth. No destruction of viability of the microorganism is implied.

Bacteriostatic Agent

91

Condition in which interstitial spaces contain such excessive amounts of fluid that skin remains depressed after palpation.

Pitting Edema

92

A solution-like system in which the size of the solute particle is between 1 and 100 nanometers. Particles of solute pass through filters but not membranes.

Colloid

93

A microorganism that prefers an environment devoid of oxygen but has adapted so that it can live and grow in the presence of oxygen.

Facultative Aerobe

94

Substance able to destroy lice.

Pediculicide

95

Fluid injected for purposes other than preservation and disinfection.

Supplemental Fluid

96

Microorganisms (Colon bacillus) found normally in the colon.

Coliform Organisms

97

Chemical agents capable of destroying, and/or inhibiting the growth of saprophytic or pathogenic fungi, including molds.

Fungicide

98

Antemortem injuries resulting from friction of the skin against a firm object resulting in the removal of the epidermis.

Abrasion

99

Destructive to bacteria.

Bactericidal Agent

100

Organelle that exists within the cell, but separate from the cell; contains hydrolytic enzymes that break down proteins and certain carbohydrates.

Lysosomes

101

The substance on which an enzyme acts.

Substrate

102

Necrotic tissue that is wet as a result of inadequate venous drainage; may be accompanied by bacterial infection.

Wet Gangrene (Moist Gangrene)

103

Deviation from the normal.

Anomaly

104

A foreign substance that stimulates the formation of antibodies that react specifically with it.

Antigen

105

Inner lining of the eye that receives the images formed by the lens and transmits those images to the brain through the optic nerve.

Retina

106

Absorption of the fluid portion of blood by the tissues after death resulting in postmortem edema.

Imbibition

107

A protein found in blood plasma.

Albumin

108

Any one of a group of nitrogenous organic compounds formed by the action of putrefactive bacteria on proteins; indole, skatole, cadaverine, and putrescine.

Ptomaine

109

A form of arteriosclerosis marked by the deposition of lipids in the inner layer of arterial walls.

Atherosclerosis

110

A blood clot which contains all the blood elements with red and white blood cells separated into distinct layers.

Chicken Fat Clot

111

The breaking down part of postmortem caloricity.

Canabolism

112

Organic compound found in plants and animals, can be broken down into amino acids.

Protein

113

Fluid in the supporting connective tissues surrounding body cells (about one fifth of the body weight).

Interstitial Fluid

114

An abscess or pyogenic infection of a sweat gland or hair follicle.

Furuncle (Boil)

115

Discharge of red blood cells in the urine.

Hematuria

116

Any change in structure produced during the course of disease or injury.

Lesion

117

A condition which occurs in dead bodies when exposed to temperatures near or below the freezing point, thus causing the tissues to become firm and rigid.

Cold Stiffening

118

The true metabolic enzymes of bacterium, produced within the bacterial cell wall.

Endoenzymes

119

Tissue that circulates through the vascular system and is composed of approximately 22% solids and 78% water.

Blood

120

The act of making tissue rigid. The solidification of a compound.

Fixation

121

Substances which increase the activity of enzymes.

Co-enzymes (Accelerators)

122

In its broadest sense, refers to the moistening, and softening, of any tissue decomposing in a liquid medium.

Maceration

123

Assimilation of gas, vapor, or dissolved matter by the surface of a solid or liquid.

Adsorption

124

Destruction of cutaneous and subcutaneous tissues; seared, charred.

Third Degree Burns

125

Injection of very strong arterial fluid (often waterless) under relatively high pressure into the head and face through both common carotid arteries to effect preservation and disinfection while minimizing swelling.

Instant Tissue Fixation ("Head Freeze")

126

Pathogenic state, resulting from the presence of microorganisms or their products in the blood or other tissues.

Sepsis

127

The arm pit.

Base of the Axillary Space

128

Removal of particles (liquid or solid) from a solution, as it passes through a membrane or other partial barrier.

Filtration

129

Dye that helps to cover internal discolorations such as jaundice.

Counter Staining Compound

130

Total evacuation (absence) of tissue.

Fourth Degree Burn

131

The enlargement of an organ or part due to the increase in size of the cells composing it.

Hypertrophy

132

Abnormal accumulation of fluids in tissue or body cavities.

Edema (Dropsy)

133

Formation of new channels in a tissue.

Canalization

134

An organic compound containing one or more hydroxyl group (-OH). The general formula or a monohydroxyl is R-OH, where R os a hydrocarbon group.

Alcohol

135

Condition characterized by the multiplication of bacteria in blood.

Septicemia

136

Separation of substances in solution by the difference of their rates of diffusion through a semipermeable membrane.

Dialysis (Selective Diffusion)

137

A wasting, decrease in size of an organ or tissue.

Atrophy

138

An injury caused by a blow without laceration.

Bruise (Ecchymosis, Contusion, Suggulation)

139

Drawing together, or a contraction, of gels which results in the giving off of water.

Syneresis

140

An evaluation of exposures that are time-weighted over an established period. It allows the exposure levels to be averaged generally over an eight-hour time period.

Time Weighted Average (TWA)

141

A liquid holding another substance in solution.

Solvent

142

To cut or tear into irregular segments.

Lacerate

143

Separation of compounds into simpler substances by action of microbial and/or autolytic enzymes.

Decomposition

144

Method by which solutes and/or solvents cross through a membrane with no energy provided by the cells of the membrane. In embalming, examples include pressure filtration, dialysis, diffusion, and osmosis.

Passive Transport System

145

Condition that results when the body part that dies had little blood and remains aseptic and occurs when the arteries but not the veins are obstructed.

Dry Gangrene (Ischemic Necrosis)

146

The substance that is dissolved in a solution.

Solute

147

The maximum legal limits established by OSHA for regulated substances. These are based on employee exposure that are time-weighted over an eight-hour work shift. When these limits are exceeded, employers must take proper steps to reduce employee exposure for formaldehyde. The level for formaldehyde is .75ppm.

Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL)

148

Relaxation phase of the heart action, or beat.

Diastole

149

Chemical in powder form that has the ability to absorb and to disinfect. Often used in cavity treatment of autopsied cases.

Hardening Compound

150

Postmortem accumulation of gas in tissues or cavities brought about by an anaerobic gas forming bacillus- Clostridium perfringens.

Tissue Gas

151

A chemical which lightens or blanches skin discoloration.

Bleach

152

Resins combined with oil, a fragrant, resinous, oily exudate from various trees and plants.

Balsamic Substance

153

Wound characterized by irregular tearing of tissue.

Laceration

154

A localized accumulation of pus.

Abscess

155

Blood in sputum.

Hemoptysis

156

The non protein portion of hemoglobin; the red pigment of the hemoglobin.

Heme

157

The white portion of the eye.

Sclera

158

Dimethylketone; a colorless liquid which is used to soften and remove scabs; a solvent for restorative wax, or a stain remover.

Acetone

159

The movement of the arterial solution from the point of injection through the blood vascular system.

Distribution Fluid

160

Soft, whitish, crumbly or greasy material that forms upon the postmortem hydrolysis and hydrogenation of body fats.

Adipocere (Grave Wax)

161

Passage of embalming solution through the capillary wall to diffuse with the interstitial fluids by application of positive intravascular pressure. Embalming solution passes from an intravascular to an extravascular position.

Pressure Filtration

162

Characteristic pus-filled structure of a disease, such as smallpox, syphilis, and acne.

Pustular Lesion

163

Distention of the pelvis and calyces of one or both kidneys with urine as a result of obstruction.

Hydronephrosis

164

Discolorations resulting from changes in blood composition, content, or location, either intravascularly or extravascularly.

Blood Discoloration

165

A vascular incision made at 90 degrees to the long axis of the vessel.

Transverse Incision

166

Those levels are established to ensure adequate protection of employees and exposures below OSHA limits, but it minimize the compliance burdens for employers whose employees have exposures below the 8 hour permissible exposure limit (PEL). The level for formaldehyde is .50ppm.

Action Level (AL-Exposure Limits)

167

Enzymes which function outside of the bacterial cell wall.

Exoenzymes

168

Bluish discoloration of the skin or mucous membrane due to lack of oxygen.

Cyanosis

169

Fluid or cellular debris exuding from blood vessels and deposited in tissues or tissue surfaces; usually a result of inflammation.

Exudate

170

A chemical which lightens skin discoloration.

Bleaching Agent

171

Intravascular; the increase of viscosity of blood brought about by the clumping of particulate formed elements in the blood vessels which is a specific type of congealing.

Agglutination

172

An antiseptic/disinfectant employed to dry moist tissues and to bleach.

Carbolic Acid (Phenol)

173

The building part of postmortem caloricity.

Anabolism

174

Contraction phase of the heart action, or beat.

Systole

175

Bacterial inhabitants of the colon.

Coli-flora

Decks in Embalming Class (61):