Upper GI Pharmacology Flashcards Preview

MS2 - Digestive, Endocrine, and Metabolic Systems > Upper GI Pharmacology > Flashcards

Flashcards in Upper GI Pharmacology Deck (20):
1

Octreotide is a _________________.

longer-acting analogue of somatostatin

2

Give the mnemonics for CYP inducers and inhibitors.

Inducers: chronic alcoholics steal phen phen and never refuse greasy carbs
- chronic alcoholism
- St. John's wort
- Phenytoin
- Phenobarbital
- Nevirapine
- Rifampin
- Griseofulvin
- Carbamazepine

Inhibitors: AAA racks in GQ magazines
- acute alcohol abuse
- ritonaivr
- amiodarone
- cimetidine
- ketoconazole
- sulfonamides
- isoniazide
- grapefruit juice
- quinolones
- macrolides (except azithromycin)

3

The mechanism of this drug is blocking H2 receptors to block the production of gastric acid.

Cimetidine, famotidine, and ranitidine

4

How do proton-pump inhibitors work?

They get molecularly trapped inside the canaliculi of parietal cells and irreversibly inhibit the H+/K+-ATPase exchanger. Importantly, they only inhibit active pumps.

5

Which drug works faster in PUD, PPIs or H2 antagonists?

PPIs; H2 antagonists work faster in acute gastritis, however.

6

The H2 receptors are on the ____________ membrane of parietal cells.

basolateral (meaning the side that faces the blood)

7

How does sucralfate work?

It is a sulfated disaccharide aluminum that binds to necrotic stomach tissue and forms a protective barrier.

8

Why is sodium bicarbonate often avoided?

Because it is readily absorbed and can cause volume overload.

9

Antacids must be taken _____________.

every two hours to be effective

10

Antacids only need to raise the gastric pH to above ____ to be effective.

4

11

What are the triple and quadruple therapies?

Triple: clarithromycin, amoxicillin, and PPI/H2ant

Quadruple: tetracycline, metronidazole, bismuth, and PPI/H2ant

12

Consider dosage adjustment of __________ in patients with hepatic failure.

PPIs

13

Which drug can produce a hyper-gastrin state?

PPIs – leading to rebound acidity if stopped abruptly

14

Which drug is better at blocking nocturnal acid secretion?

H2 antagonists – this is crucial for duodenal ulcer healing

15

What other drug's absorption can be impacted by increased gastric pH?

Ketoconazole (it requires a low pH to be absorbed)

16

What drug stimulates the release of acetylcholine by PNS neurons onto smooth muscle by antagonizing dopamine, thus acting as an pro-kinetic agent?

Metoclopramide

17

True or false: stimulation of M3 receptors leads to peristalsis.

False. Stimulating the muscarinic receptors (say, with bethanechol) leads to uncoordinated contraction.

18

The best treatment for NSAID-induced ulcers is ________________.

(1) stop taking the NSAID
(2) PPI

19

Adjust the dosage of H2 inhibitors in _________________.

the elderly with renal impairments

20

What side effect do the drugs that directly stimulate acetylcholine release have?

Prolonged QT (this is tegaserod and cisapride)

Decks in MS2 - Digestive, Endocrine, and Metabolic Systems Class (133):