Word List 14 Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Word List 14 Deck (90):
1

entrust

to confer a trust on; especially to deliver something in trust to
to commit to another with confidence

e.g. She was entrusted with the job of organizing the reception.
We entrusted our financial adviser with the investment of all of our savings.

2

enunciate

to make a definite or systematic statement of
announce, proclaim
articulate, pronounce

e.g. He set out to enunciate the basic principles of his system.
enunciate all the syllables

3

denunciation

an act of denouncing; especially a public condemnation

e.g. The attack drew strong denunciations from leaders around the world.

4

environ

encircle, surround

e.g. a decaying, impoverished city environed by affluent suburbs

5

envision

to picture to oneself

e.g. envisions a career dedicated to promoting peace

6

epaulet

something that ornaments or protects the shoulder (an ornamental fringed shoulder pad formerly worn as part of a military uniform; an ornamental strip or loop sewn across the shoulder of a dress of coat)

7

ephemeral

lasting one day only
lasting a very short time

e.g. an ephemeral fever
The autumnal blaze of colors is always to be treasured, all the more so because it is so ephemeral.

8

epicure

one with sensitive and discriminating tastes especially in food or wine

9

epidemic

affecting or tending to affect a disproportionately large number of individuals within a population, community, or region at the same time
excessively prevalent
contagious
characterized by very widespread growth or extent

e.g. Typhoid was epidemic.
epidemic laughter
The practice had reached epidemic proportions.

10

episodic

made up of separate especially loosely connected episodes; having the form of an episode
of or limited in duration or significance to a particular episode; temporary
occurring, appearing, or changing at usually irregular intervals; occasional

e.g. The long novel was filmed for television as an episodic movie that was shown over the course of five evenings.
Malaria is characterized by episodic attacks of chills and fever that coincide with mass destruction of blood cells.

11

equine

of, relating to, or resembling a horse or the horse family

12

episodic

13

epitaph

an inscription on or at a tomb or a grave in memory of the one buried there
a brief statement commemorating or epitomizing a deceased person or something past

e.g. The epitaph reads "In loving memory of...."

14

epithet

a characterizing word or phrase accompanying or occurring in place of the name of a person or thing
a disparaging or abusive word or phrase

e.g. His charitable works have earned him the epithet "Mr. Philanthropy."
a group of angry people hurling epithets at one another

15

epitome

a summary of a written work; a brief presentation or statement of something
a typical or ideal example; embodiment
brief or miniature form (usually used with in)

e.g. The golden rule is often cited as the epitome of moral conduct: "Do unto others as you would have them do unto you."
The prestigious prep school prides itself on being widely regarded as the epitome of tradition and old-fashioned values.

16

epitomize

- epitome

e.g. This student's struggles epitomize the trouble with our schools.
His personal code of behavior on playing field is epitomized by his favorite saying, "Nice guys finish last".

17

epoch

an event or a time marked by an event that begins a new period or development
a memorable event or date

e.g. The development of the steam engine marked an important epoch in the history of industry.

18

equable

marked by lack of variation or change; uniform
marked by lack of noticeable, unpleasant, or extreme variation or inequality

e.g. An area with an equable climate would be our first choice for a place in which to settle.

19

intemperate

not temperate; especially given to excessive use of intoxicating liquors

e.g. intemperate anger so extreme that the man should be in therapy
a serious course in wine appreciation that does not welcome intemperate drinkers and party animals

20

equanimity

evenness of mind especially under stress
right disposition; balance

e.g. an Olympic diver who always displays remarkable equanimity on the platform
physical equanimity

21

librate

to oscillate or move from side to side or between two points
to remain poised or balanced

22

escapism

habitual diversion of the mind to purely imaginative activity or entertainment as an escape from reality or routine

e.g. Reading romantic novels is for her a form of escapism.

23

equivocate

to use unclear language especially with intent to deceive
to avoid committing oneself in what one says

e.g. The applicant seemed to be equivocating when we asked him about his last job.

24

erasure

- erase

e.g. accidental erasure of the tape

25

erect

vertical in position; standing up or out from the body
to building something by putting together materials
to fix in an upright position
to elevate in status

e.g. A lone tree remained erect after the terrible tornado had passed.
The city erected a statue in his honor.

26

err

to make a mistake
to violate an accepted standard of conduct

e.g. erred in his calculation
The court erred in refusing to allow bail.

27

erratic

having no fixed course; wandering
characterized by lack of consistency, regularity, or uniformity
deviating from what is ordinary or standard; eccentric

e.g. an erratic comet
Because of your erratic attendance at practice, you are in danger of being cut from the team.
an erratic genius

28

ersatz

being a usually artificial and inferior substitute or imitation

e.g. an apartment complex designed as an ersatz Mediterranean villa
Like everything else the restaurant served, the whipped cream on the dessert was ersatz.

29

erstwhile

in the past; former, previous/ formerly

e.g. There's now a store where erstwhile lay green and pleasant pastures.
My erstwhile friend ignored me when I ran into her at the mall.

30

erudite

having or showing knowledge that is gained by studying; possessing or displaying erudition

e.g. an erudite scholar
an erudite lecture on the latest discoveries in astronomy

31

unlettered

lacking facility in reading and writing and ignorant of the knowledge to be gained from books
illiterate
not marked with letters

e.g. Unlettered moviegoers could scarcely imagine how little resemblance the film bore to the novel on which it was supposedly based.

32

escapism

habitual diversion of the mind to purely imaginative activity or entertainment as an escape from reality or routine

e.g. Reading romantic novels is for her a form of escapism.

33

esoteric

designed for or understood by the specially initiated along
requiring or exhibiting knowledge that is restricted to a small group
limited to a small group; private, confidential
of special, rare, or unusual interest

e.g. Metaphysics is such an esoteric subject that most people are content to leave it to the philosophers.

34

espouse

marry
to take up and support as a cause; become attached to

e.g. The new theory has been espoused by many leading physicists.

35

espy

to catch sight of

e.g. Out of the corner of my eye I espied the squirrel making another raid on the bird feeder.

36

estimable

capable of being estimated
worthy of esteem

e.g. We owe thanks to our estimable colleagues.

37

estrange

to remove from customary environment or associations
to arouse especially mutual enmity or indifference in where there had formerly been love, affection, or friendliness; alienate

e.g. She estranged several of her coworkers when she let her promotion go to her head.

38

etch

to produce (as a pattern or design) on a hard material by eating into the material's surface (as by acid or laser beam)
to delineate or impress clearly

e.g. glass that has been etched with an identification number
Pain was etched on his features.

39

ethereal

of or relating to the regions beyond the earth; celestial, heavenly; unworldly, spiritual
lacking material substance; immaterial, intangible
marked by unusual delicacy or refinement

e.g. The windows give the church an ethereal glow.
the ethereal attribute that every performer should have - charisma

40

ponderous

of very great weight
unwieldy or clumsy because of weight or size
oppressively or unpleasantly dull; lifeless

e.g. students struggling to stay awake during a ponderous lecture

41

senescence

the state of being old; the process of becoming old
the growth phase in a plant or plant part from full maturity to death

42

ethos

the distinguishing character, sentiment, moral nature, or guiding beliefs of a person, group, or institution

e.g. The company made environmental awareness part of its business ethos.
They are working to keep a democratic ethos alive in the community.

43

etiquette

the conduct or procedure required by good breeding or prescribed by authority to be observed in social or official life

e.g. Her failure to respond to the invitation was a serious breach of etiquette.

44

etymology

the history of a linguistic form (as a word) shown by tracing its development since its earliest recorded occurrence

45

eulogy

a commendatory oration or writing especially in honor of one deceased

e.g. Several eulogies were given at the special assembly marking the retirement of the company's longtime president.

46

euphonious

pleasing to the ear

e.g. The doorbell had a noticeably euphonious chime.

47

euphoria

a feeling of well-being or elation

e.g. The initial euphoria following their victory in the election has now subsided.

48

semaphore

an apparatus for visual signaling
a system of visual signaling by two flags held one in each hand

49

evanescent

tending to vanish like vapor

e.g. beauty that is as evanescent as a rainbow

50

efflorescence

the action or process of developing and unfolding as if coming into flower; blossoming
fullness of manifestation; culmination

51

senescence

the state of being old; the process of becoming old
the growth phase in a plant or plant part from full maturity to death

52

evenhanded

fair, impartial

e.g. an evenhanded meting out of punishment

53

evict

to recover (property) from a person by legal process
to put (a tenant) out by legal process
to force out; expel

e.g. His landlord has threatened to evict him if he doesn't pay the rent soon.

54

evince

to constitute outward evidence of
to display clearly; reveal

e.g. She evinced an interest in art at an early age.

55

evoke

to call forth or up
to re-create imaginatively

e.g. His photographs evoke the isolation and solitude of the desert.

56

ewe

the female of the sheep especially when mature

57

ewer

a vase-shaped pitcher or jug

58

acerbate

irritate, exasperate

59

exacerbate

to make more violent, bitter, or severe

e.g. The proposed factory shutdown would only exacerbate our unemployment problems.

60

exact

to call for forcibly or urgently and obtain
to call for as necessary or desirable

e.g. They would not rest until they had exacted revenge.

61

exacting

- exact

e.g. He was shocked when his normally exacting supervisor complimented him on a job well done.

62

exactitude

the quality or an instance of being exact; exactness

e.g. After its opening weekend, a movie's final box office gross can be estimated with considerable exactitude.

63

exalt

to raise in rank, power, or character
to elevate by praise or in estimation; glorify
to raise high; elevate
to enhance the activity of; intensify

e.g. His behavior has exalted the power and prestige of his office.
The essay exalts the simple beauty of the country.

64

exasperate

to excite the anger of; enrage
to cause irritation or annoyance to

e.g. We were exasperated by the delays.

65

pillory

to set in a pillory as punishment
to expose to public contempt, ridicule, or scorn

e.g. The press pilloried the judge for her decision.

66

excavate

to form a cavity or hole in; to form by hollowing out; to dig out and remove
to expose to view by or as if by digging away a covering

e.g. They began excavating the backyard for their new pool.

67

prosaic

characteristic of prose as distinguished from poetry; factual
dull, unimaginative
everyday, ordinary

e.g. the prosaic life of a hardworking farmer
heroic behaviors wasted in prosaic lives

68

occlude

to close up or block off; obstruct
sorb

e.g. A blood clot had occluded a major artery in his body.

69

excoriate

to wear off the skin of; abrade
to censure scathingly

e.g. The candidates have publicly excoriated each other throughout the campaign.

70

exculpate

to clear from alleged fault or guilt

e.g. The court exculpated him after a thorough investigation.

71

excursion

a going out or forth; expedition
a usually brief pleasure trip
deviation from a direct, definite, or proper course; especially, digression
the movement outward and back or from a mean position or axis; also, the distance traversed; amplitude

e.g. Our weekend excursions have encompassed virtually all parts of our home state.
needless excursions into abstruse theory
the excursion of a pistol

72

excursive

constituting a digression; characterized by digression

e.g. an excursive story line that some readers of Melville's novel find very rewarding

73

execrable

deserving to be execrated; detestable
very bad; wretched

e.g. the execrable living conditions in slums

74

execrate

- execrable

e.g. She came to execrate the hypocritical values of her upper-class upbringing.

75

preempt

to acquire (as land) by preemption
to seize upon to the exclusion of others; take for oneself
to replace with something considered to be of greater value or priority; take precedence over
to gain a commanding or preeminent place in
to prevent from happening or taking place; forestall

e.g. The contract preempts lawsuits by the company's clients.
The state law was preempted by a federal law.

76

exhaustive

including all possibilities; thorough

e.g. conducted an exhaustive search

77

exhilarate

to make cheerful and excited; enliven, elate
refresh, stimulate

e.g. The climactic moment of commencement ceremonies usually exhilarates graduates and proud parents alike.

78

exhort

to incite by argument or advice; urge strongly

e.g. She exhorted her listeners to support the proposition.

79

hortative

giving exhortation; advisory

80

exigent

requiring immediate aid or action
requiring or calling for much; demanding

e.g. started his workday with a flood of exigent matters that required his quick decision
an exigent client

81

exodus

a mass departure; emigration

e.g. the mass exodus from the cities to the beaches and the mountains on most summer weekends

82

exonerate

to relieve of a responsibility, obligation, or hardship
to clear from accusation or blame

e.g. The results of the DNA fingerprinting finally exonerated the man, but only after he had wasted 10 years of his life in prison.

83

onerous

involving, imposing, or constituting a burden; troublesome
having legal obligations that outweighs the advantages

e.g. an onerous task
had an onerous and stressful job of notifying the families of soldiers killed in action

84

exorbitant

not coming within the scope of the law
exceeding the customary or appropriate limits in intensity, quality, amount, or size

e.g. They were charged exorbitant rates for phone calls.

85

expansive

having a capacity or a tendency to expand
causing or tending to cause expansion
characterized by high spirits, generosity, or readiness to talk; open
marked by or indicative of exaggerated euphoria and delusions of self-importance
sizable, extensive

e.g. He was unusually expansive at the press conference.
an expansive patient
an expansive interpretation of the law

86

expediency

the quality or state or being suited to the end in view; suitability, fitness
adherence to expedient means and methods
a means of achieving a particular end; expedient

e.g. The expediency of such a plan is questionable.

87

expedient

suitable for achieving a particular end in a given circumstances
characterized by concern with what is opportune; especially, governed by self-interest
something done or used to achieve a particular end usually quickly or temporarily; an expedient action or solution

e.g. They found it expedient to negotiate with the terrorists.
Do the right thing, not the expedient thing.
The government chose short-term expedients instead of a real economic policy.

88

expeditious

marked by or acting with prompt efficiency

e.g. a company that is well-regarded for its expeditious handling of any request or complaint

89

expend

to pay out; spend
to make use of for a specific purpose; utilize

e.g. the social services upon which public revenue is expended
projects on which they expended great energy

90

expenditure

the act or process of expending
something expended; disbursement, expense

e.g. an increase in military expenditure