Word List 32 Flashcards Preview

GRE Vocabulary > Word List 32 > Flashcards

Flashcards in Word List 32 Deck (103):
1

riotous

of the nature of a riot; turbulent
participating in riot
abundant, exuberant

e.g. a riotous profusion of flowers
His riotous mugging always has everyone in hysterics.

2

ripple

to become lightly ruffled or covered with small waves
to flow with a light rise and fall of sound or inflection
to have or produce a ripple effect; spread
also

e.g. The scarf rippled to the floor.
Laughter rippled over the audience.
A cool breeze rippled the water.
a ripple of laughter

3

rive

to wrench open or tear apart or to pieces; rend
to divide into pieces

e.g. road pavement that had been riven by the annual freeze-and-thaw cycle
nations riven by civil war

4

rivet

a special kind of metal bolt or pin that is used to hold pieces of metal together
to fasten with or as if with rivets
to attract and hold (as the attention) completely

e.g. The iron plates are riveted rather than welded.
stood riveted by fright
Everyone riveted their eyes on the trick that the magician was performing on stage.

5

riveting

having the power to fix the attention; engrossing, fascinating

6

rivulet

a small stream

e.g. Small rivulets trickled down the side of the cliff.

7

roe

the eggs of a fish especially when still enclosed in the ovarian membrane

8

roil

to stir up; disturb, disorder
to make agitated and angry; upset, rile

e.g. Financial markets have been roiled by the banking crisis.
The waters of the gulf tossed and roiled as the hurricane surged toward the shore.

9

rostrum

a small raised platform on a stage

10

royalty

royal status or power; sovereignty
a payment to an author or composer for each copy of a work sold or to an inventor for each item sold under a patent
a share of the product or profit reserved by the grantor especially of an oil or mining lease

11

rubicund

having a healthy reddish color; ruddy

e.g. the rubicund face of a man who clearly got a lot of fresh air and exercise

12

rudder

a flat, movable piece usually of wood or metal that is attached to a ship, boat, airplane, etc., and is used in steering
a guiding force or strategy

e.g. His ideas provided a rudder for the new company.
The captain turned the rudder sharply to avoid hitting the rock.

13

rudimentary

consisting in first principles; fundamental
of a primitive kind
very imperfectly developed or represented only a vestige

e.g. only a rudimentary formal education
When baseball was in its rudimentary stages, different teams played by different rules.
the rudimentary tail of a hyrax

14

rue

regret, sorrow
to feel penitence, remorse, or regret for

e.g. With rue my heart is laden.
ruing his decision
I rue the day I agreed to this stupid plan.

15

ruffian

a brutal person; bully

e.g. a gang of ruffians preying upon people who ventured into that section of town

16

ruffle

roughen, abrade; trouble, vex
to flip through (as pages)
shuffle

e.g. Her hair was ruffled by the wind.
He ruffled some people with his constant complaining.

17

ruminant

an animal (such as a cow or sheep) that has more than one stomach and that swallows food and then brings it back up again to continue chewing it
given to or engaged in contemplation; meditative

e.g. I wandered around campus all day in a ruminant mood.
in this attitude of ruminant relish

18

rumple

fold, wrinkle
wrinkle, crumple
to make unkempt; tousle

e.g. He rumpled her hair affectionately.

19

rung

a rounded crosspiece between the legs of a chair
one of the crosspieces of a ladder
a level in hierarchy

e.g. on the bottom rung on the corporate ladder
the top rung of society

20

runic

consisting or set down in runes (a ancient set of characters)
having some secret or mysterious meaning

e.g. runic inscription

21

ruse

a wily subterfuge; a trick or act that is used to fool someone

e.g. His act was just a clever ruse to get me to go out with him.

22

rustic

rural
characteristic of or resembling country people; lacking in social graces or polish
appropriate to the country

e.g. rustic rolling farmland
rustic yokels whose first impulse was to smirk gawkily at anyone not of their own kind

23

sabotage

the act of destroying or damaging something deliberately so that it does not work properly
to practice sabotage on

e.g. Officials have not yet ruled out sabotage as a possible cause of the crash.
people trying to sabotage this opportunity of peace

24

saboteur

one that practices sabotage

e.g. The car's tires were slashed by saboteurs.

25

saccharin

a very sweet, white substance that does not have any calories and that is used instead of sugar to sweeten food

26

saccharine

overly or sickishly sweet
ingratiatingly or affectedly agreeable or friendly
overly sentimental; mawkish

e.g. The movie was funny, but it had a saccharine ending in which everyone lives happily ever after.

27

sacrilege

a technical and not necessarily intrinsically outrageous violation (as improper reception of a sacrament) of what is sacred because consecrated to God
gross irreverence toward a hallowed person, place, or thing

e.g. His gesture is so bold it has whiff of sacrilege, not just of art-world rebellion.

28

saddle

a leather-covered seat that is put on the back of a horse; a seat on a bicycle or motorcycle
to put a saddle on
to place under a burden or encumbrance
to place (an onerous responsibility) on

e.g. To the social worker it seems as though her supervisor had once again saddled her with a truly hopeless case.

29

sagacious

of keen and farsighted penetration and judgment; discerning
caused by or indicating acute discernment

e.g. a sagacious critique of the current social climate in our nation

30

salient

moving by leaps or springs; jumping
jetting upward
standing out conspicuously; prominent; especially, of notable significance

e.g. a salient fountain
salient differences

31

salubrious

favorable to or promoting health or well-being

e.g. Fresh air and exercise are always salubrious.

32

salutary

producing a beneficial effect; remedial
promoting health; curative

e.g. The accident should be a salutary lesson to be more careful.
The low interest rates should have a salutary effect on business.

33

salvage

the act of saving or rescuing property in danger
to rescue or save especially from wreckage or ruin

e.g. The ship was beyond salvage.
the salvage from the wrecked ship

34

salvable

capable of being saved or salvaged

35

salve

an unctuous adhesive substance for application to wounds or sores; s remedial or soothing influence or agency
to remedy with or as if with a salve
quiet, assuage

e.g. a salve to their hurt feelings
give him a raise in salary to salve his feelings

36

sanctify

consecrate
to free from sin; purify
to give moral or social sanction to

e.g. sanctify every act of life and bring the humblest obligation into relationship with God
sanctify a vow

37

sanctimonious

hypocritically pious or devout

e.g. Some of the most cunning fellows known to the police have had quite a sanctimonious appearance.

38

sanction

to make valid or binding usually by a formal procedure (as ratification)
to give effective or authoritative approval or consent to
also

e.g. an expression now sanctioned by educated usage
sanction a law
The country acted without the sanction of the other nations.

39

sanguine

bloodred
confident, optimistic

e.g. sanguine about the company's future

40

sap

the fluid part of a plant; bodily health and vigor
a foolish gullible person
to gradually diminish the supply or intensity of
to weaken or exhaust

e.g. The illness sapped him of his stamina.

41

sapient

possessing or expressing great sagacity

e.g. valuable insights and sapient advice

42

sartorial

of or relating to a tailor or tailored clothes; broadly, of or relating to clothes

e.g. poor sartorial taste
The wedding party arrived in sartorial splendor.

43

sash

a band worn about the waist or over one shoulder and used as a dress accessory or the emblem of an honorary or military order
the framework in which panes of glasses are set in a window or door

44

sate

to cloy with overabundance; glut
to appease (as a thirst) by indulging to the full

e.g. sate the appetite of vampire-starved fans

45

satiety

the quality or state of being fed or gratified to or beyond capacity; surfeit, fullness
the revulsion or disgust caused by overindulgence or excess

e.g. eating beyond the point of satiety

46

satiate

filled to satiety
to satisfy (as a need or desire) fully or to excess

e.g. A couple of satiate dinner guests had ensconced themselves on the living room sofa.
eager to satiate the needs of the rich and the foreign

47

satirize

to utter or write satire
to censure or ridicule by means of satire

e.g. The book satirizes contemporary life.

48

saturnine

cold and steady in mood; slow to act or change
of a gloomy or surly disposition
having a sardonic smile

e.g. saturnine of countenance, liberal of heart

49

saunter

to walk about in an idle or leisurely manner; stroll
also

e.g. saunter slowly down the street

50

savage

not domesticated; untamed
lacking the restraints normal to civilized human beings; fierce, ferocious
wild, uncultivated
boorish, rude
also a person with such attributes

e.g. savage beast / a savage criminal / a savage country
the savage bad manners of most motorists

51

savant

a person of learning; especially, one with detailed knowledge in some specialized field

e.g. a savant in the field of medical ethics

52

savvy

understand
practical know-how
having or showing perception, comprehension, or shrewdness especially in practical matters

e.g. She's an excellent scholar of political science, but lacks the kind of savvy needed to run for office.
a savvy investors / savvy about computers

53

sawdust

fine particles (as of wood) made by a saw in cutting

54

scabbard

a sheath for a sword, dagger, or bayonet

55

scad

a large number or quantity (oft. pl.)

e.g. scads of money

56

scalding

hot enough to scald
having or producing the feeling of being burned
scathing

e.g. scalding water/sun/sand
scalding criticism

57

scant

barely or scarcely sufficient; especially, not quite coming up to a stated measure
lacking in amplitude or quantity
having a small or insufficient supply

e.g. in scant supply
a scant teaspoon / scant growth
pay scant attention to the facts

58

scathing

bitterly severe

e.g. a scathing review of the book
a scathing rebuttal of the latest theory concerning the assassination

59

scheme

a graphic sketch or outline
a concise statement or table; epitome
a place or program of action; especially, a crafty or secret one
a systematic or organized configuration; design

e.g. a scheme to cheat people out of their money
a scheme to improve the economy

60

schism

division, separation; also, discord, disharmony

e.g. a schism between leading members of the party

61

scion

a piece of plant that is attached to part of another plant
descendant, child; especially, a descendant of a wealthy, aristocratic, or influential family
heir

e.g. scion of a railroad empire
scion of a powerful family

62

scoff

an expression of scorn, derision, or contempt
an object of scorn, mockery, or derision
to show contempt by derisive acts or language
to eat greedily
seize (oft. used with up)

e.g. scoffed at the idea
scoffed dinner

63

scotch

to put an end to

e.g. scotched rumors of a military takeover

64

scourge

whip; especially, one used for punishment
an instrument of punishment or criticism
a cause of wide or great affliction
flog, whip; to punish severely
afflict; chastise

e.g. a city ravaged by the scourge of unemployment
The disease continues to be a scourge in the developing world.

65

scowl

to contract the brow in an expression of displeasure
to exhibit a threatening aspect
also

e.g. scowled down at the misbehaving child
respond to his question with a scowl

66

scrap

(pl.) fragments of discarded or leftover food
a small detached piece; the least bit
to abandon or get rid of as no longer of enough worth or effectiveness to retain

e.g. a scrap of paper / scraps of conversation
not a scrap of evidence
scrap outworn methods

67

scrappy

consisting of scraps
quarrelsome
having an aggressive and determined spirit; feisty

e.g. scrappy meals

68

scrawl

to write or draw awkwardly, hastily, or carelessly

e.g. scrawled a quick note

69

screw

a person who bargains shrewdly; also, skinflint

70

scrub

a stunted tree or shrub
a person of insignificant size or standing
to clean with hard rubbing
cancel, eliminate

e.g. scrub the game because of bad weather

71

scruple

an ethical consideration or principle that inhibits action; the quality or state of being scrupulous
mental reservation
to have scruples
to show reluctance on grounds of conscience; hesitate

e.g. do something without a scruple
If I can help in any way, please don't scruple to tell me.

72

scrupulous

having moral integrity; acting in strict regard for what is considered right or proper
punctiliously exact; painstaking

e.g. Less scrupulous companies find ways to evade the law.
working with scrupulous care / scrupulous attention to detail

73

scrutable

capable of being deciphered; comprehensible

e.g. She thinks that she is a sly and subtle schemer, but her machinations and motives are all too scrutable to those of us who know her.

74

scrutinize

to examine closely and minutely

e.g closely scrutinize the opponent's every move
Her performance was carefully scrutinized by her employer.

75

scuff

to walk without lifting the feet; shuffle
to poke or shuffle a foot in exploration or embarrassment
to become scratched, chipped, or roughened by wear

e.g. She scuffed down the hall towards her room.
scuff up her shoes by rubbing her feet under the rung of the chair

76

scurrilous

using or given to coarse language
vulgar and evil
containing obscenities, abuse, or slander

e.g. a scurrilous attack on the senator
a scurrilous satire on the scandal

77

scurry

to move in or as if in a brisk pace; scamper
to move around in an agitated, confused, or fluttering manner

78

scurvy

a disease that is caused by not eating enough fruits or vegetables that contain vitamin C
arousing disgust or scorn; contemptible, despicable

e.g. After winning the lottery, she was beset by a whole scurvy swarm of con artists.

79

scythe

a farming tool with a curved blade and long handle that is used for cutting grass, grain, etc.

80

seamy

unpleasant
degraded, sordid

e.g. the seamy side or urban life
a seamy corruption scandal

81

seasoned

experienced

82

secede

to withdraw from an organization

83

secrete

to form and give off (a secretion)
to deposit or conceal in a hiding place
to appropriate secretly; abstract

e.g. squirrels secreting nuts in a hollow tree trunk

84

secular

of or relating to the worldly or temporal
not overtly or specifically religious
occurring once in an age or a century
of or relating to a long term of indefinite duration

e.g. secular concerns/music
secular inflation

85

security

an instrument of investment in the form of a document (as a stock certificate or bond) providing evidence of its ownership

86

sedentary

not migratory; settled
doing or requiring much sitting; not physically active
permanently attached

e.g. sedentary birds/civilizations
a sedentary job/lifestyle
sedentary barnacles

87

sedulity

diligence

88

sedulous

involving or accomplished with careful perseverance
diligent in application or pursuit

e.g. An impressive sedulous suitor, he was constantly sending her flowers and other tokens of his affection.

89

seedling

a young plant grown from seed

90

seemly

good-looking, handsome; attractive
conventionally proper; decorous
suited to the occasion, purpose, or person; fit

e.g. a young man of seemly appearance, robust health, and keen intelligence
It would not be seemly to use the memorial service as a forum for political views.

91

seep

to flow or pass slowly through fine pores or small openings; ooze
to enter or penetrate slowly
to become diffused or spread

e.g. water seeping in through a crack
Fear of nuclear war had seeped into the national consciousness.

92

seethe

(of a liquid) bubble up as a result of being boiled
(of a person) be filled with intense but unexpressed anger
(of a place) be crowded with people or things moving about in a rapid or hectic way
(of a crowd of people) move in a rapid or hectic way

e.g. The brew foamed and seethed.
Inwardly he was seething at the slight to his authority.
The entire cellar was seething with spiders.
We cascaded down the stairs and seethed across the station.

93

seine

a large net with sinkers on one edge and floats on the other that hangs vertically in the water and is used to enclose and catch fish when its ends are pulled together or are drawn ashore
to fish with or catch fish with a seine

94

seismic

of, subject to, or caused by an earthquake
having a strong or widespread impact; earthshaking

e.g. seismic social changes

95

semblance

outward and often specious appearance or show
a small amount; modicum
aspect, countenance
image, likeness; actual or apparent resemblance

e.g. wrapped in a semblance of composure
struggling to get some semblance of justice
Her story bears some semblance to the truth.

96

seminal

of, relating to, or consisting of seed or semen
containing or contributing the seeds of later development; creative, original

e.g. a seminal book / seminal ideas

97

seminary

an environment in which something originates and from which it is propagated
an institution of secondary or higher education
an institution for the training of candidates for the priesthood, ministry, or rabbinate

e.g. Some claimed that orphanages were seminaries of sin and petty crime, turning out juvenile delinquents by the score.

98

sensible

of a kind to be felt or perceived
receptive to external influences; sensitive
emotionally aware and responsive
having, containing, or indicative of good sense or reason; rational, reasonable
practical

e.g. a sensible chill / the sensible world we live in
sensible to pain / sensible of my error
sensible of your problems
sensible people / a sensible answer
sensible shoes

99

sentient

responsive to or conscious of sense impressions
aware
finely sensitive in perception or feeling

e.g. sentient of the danger posed by the hurricane

100

sepulcher

a place of burial; tomb
a receptacle for religious relics especially in an altar

e.g. a poem describing the forgotten the sepulcher of a valiant knight of the Middle Ages

101

sequester

to set apart; separate
seclude, withdraw
to seize especially by a writ of sequestration
to place in custody especially in sequestration

e.g. The jury was sequestered until a verdict was reached.
Widely spaced homes are forbiddingly grand and sequestered.
Plants can sequester toxins and store them in the tissues.

102

seraphic

angel-like

103

sere

being dried and withered

e.g. a sere region that cannot support agriculture