Word List 34 Flashcards Preview

GRE Vocabulary > Word List 34 > Flashcards

Flashcards in Word List 34 Deck (69):
1

sophistry

subtly deceptive reasoning or argumentation

2

soporific

causing or tending to cause sleep
tending to dull awareness or alertness

e.g. the soporific heat of summer

3

sopping

wet through; soaking

4

sordid

marked by baseness or grossness; vile
dirty, filthy
meanly avaricious; covetous

e.g. sordid details of his past

5

sow

an adult female swine
to plant seed for growth especially by scattering
to set something in motion; begin an enterprise

e.g. sow corn
The new policy has sown confusion and doubt.
We walked through a valley sown with boulders.

6

spackle

to apply crack-filling paste to

7

spar

box
skirmish, wrangle

8

sparse

of few and scattered elements; especially, not thickly grown or settled

9

spartan

a person of great courage and self-discipline
marked by strict self-discipline or self-denial
marked by simplicity, frugality, or avoidance of luxury and comfort
laconic
undaunted by pain or danger

e.g. a spartan athlete/room

10

spat

a brief petty quarrel or angry outburst
to quarrel pettily or briefly

e.g. lovers' spat
spat over money more than anything else

11

spate

freshet, flood
a large number or amount
a sudden or strong outburst; rush

e.g. a spate of books on gardening
a spate of anger

12

spawn

to produce or deposit
bring forth, generate

e.g. The health-food craze spawned a multimillion-dollar industry.

13

specious

having deceptive attraction or allure
having a false look of truth or genuineness; sophistic

e.g. a specious argument that really does not stand up under close examination

14

specter

a visible disembodied spirit; ghost
something that haunts or perturbs the mind; phantasm

e.g. feeling so terrified that every shadow became a specter
the specter of hunger

15

spell

an indeterminate period of time

e.g. wait a spell before continuing

16

spendthrift

a person who spends improvidently or wastefully
also

17

spindly

of a disproportionately tall or long and thin appearance that often suggests physical weakness
frail or flimsy in appearance or structure

e.g. spindly, underfed dogs roamed the poverty-stricken village

18

spite

petty ill will or hatred with the disposition to irritate, annoy, or thwart

e.g. spread cruel lies out of pure spite

19

spleen

feelings of anger or ill will often suppressed

e.g. The bill's failure to pass in the legislature was due to nothing more than partisan spleen.

20

splice

to unite, link, or insert as if by splicing

e.g. splice a human gene for insulin into a bacterium

21

splurge

an ostentatious effort, display, or expenditure
to indulge oneself extravagantly (oft. used with on)

e.g. the annual pre-Christmas splurge
I'd splurged about $2,500 on clothes.

22

spoke

one of the bars that connect the center of a wheel to the rim

23

spoof

deceive, hoax
to make good-natured fun of
hoax, deception
a light humorous parody

e.g. They proceeded to spoof Western intelligence with false information.
It is a movie that spoofs other movies.

24

sporadic

occurring occasionally, singly, or in irregular or random instances

25

sport

to amuse oneself; frolic
to mock or ridicule something
to display or wear usually ostentatiously; boast

e.g. sporting expensive new shoes

26

sprawling

spreading or developing irregularly or without restraint

e.g. bushes sprawling along the road
a sprawling narrative

27

sprig

a small shoot; twig
heir; youth

e.g. a sprig of the French nobility

28

sprightly

marked by a gay lightness and vivacity; spirited
having a distinctively piquant taste; zesty

e.g. a sprightly musical/salsa

29

spruce

to make spruce
neat or smart in appearance; trim

e.g. a slim, spruce man in a tailor-made business suit
spruce himself up a bit

30

spurious

outwardly similar or corresponding to something without having its genuine qualities; false
of a deceitful nature or quality

e.g. the spurious eminence of the pop celebrity
spurious excuses

31

squalid

marked by filthiness and degradation from neglect or poverty
sordid

32

squall

to cry out raucously; scream
to utter in a strident voice
a sudden violent wind often with rain or snow
a short-lived commotion

33

squalor

- squalid

e.g. shocked by the squalor of their surroundings

34

squander

to spend extravagantly or foolishly; dissipate, waste
to cause to disperse; scatter

e.g. squander this opportunity / squander money

35

square

to regulate or adjust by or to some standards or principle
balance, settle
to set right; bring into agreement

e.g. square our actions by the opinions of others
square an account
square their goals with their beliefs

36

squash

to press or beat into a pulp or a flat mass; crush
put down, suppress

e.g. squash a revolt

37

squelch

to completely suppress; quell
silence

e.g. squelch resistance / protesters

38

staid

marked by settled sedateness and often prim self-restraint; sober, grave

e.g. a staid and solemn businessman

39

stalemate

a drawn contest; deadlock; also, the state of being stalemated

40

stalwart

marked by outstanding strength and vigor of body, mind, or spirit

e.g. stalwart soldiers
stalwart common sense

41

stanch

to check or stop the flowing of

e.g. stancher her tears
stanch the crime wave

42

staple

a place of supply; source
a chief commodity or production of a place
used, needed, or enjoyed constantly usually by many individuals
produced regularly or in large quantities
principal, chief

e.g. a staple plot in mystery

43

stark

rigid in or as if in death; rigidly conforming
utter, sheer
barren, desolate; bare
harsh, blunt

e.g. stark discipline
stark simplicity / a stark white room
the start realities of death

44

statuary

sculptor
the art of making statues
a collection of statues

e.g. a fine example of late Renaissance statuary

45

statute

a law enacted by the legislative branch of a government
a permanent rule

46

statutory

- statute

e.g. a statutory age limit

47

steadfast

firmly fixed in place; immovable
not subject to change
firm in belief, determination, or adherence; loyal

e.g. steadfast in his support for the policies

48

stem

to check or go counter to (something adverse)

49

stench

stink
a characteristic repugnant quality

50

stencil

a piece of paper, metal, etc., that has a design, letter, etc., cut out of it
something that is produced by means of a stencil

e.g. The walls of the living room had a delicate vine stencil drawn on them.

51

stentorian

extremely loud

52

stickler

one who insists on exactness or completeness in the observance of something
something that baffles or puzzles; poser, sticker

e.g. a stickler for rules

53

stifle

suffocate
smother, muffle
to withhold from circulation or expression
deter, discourage

e.g. stifle a cry / stifle anger

54

stilted

pompous, lofty
formal, stiff

e.g. The conversation was somewhat stilted as we didn't seem to share any interests.
a stilted letter of apology that was written and accepted with equal measures of insincerity

55

stint

to be sparing or frugal
to restrict with respect to a share or allowance

e.g. not stinting with their praise
stint herself of luxuries

56

stipple

to engrave by means of dots and flicks
to apply (as paint) by repeated small touches
speckle, fleck

57

stipulate

to specify as a condition or requirement

e.g. The cease-fire was stipulated by the treaty.

58

stock

commonly used or brought forward; standard

e.g. the stock answer

59

stockade

a line of stout posts set firmly to form a defense
an enclosure

e.g. prisoners of war confined in a stockade

60

stocky

compact, sturdy, and relatively thick in build

61

stodgy

boring, dull
extremely old-fashioned; hidebound

e.g. The sitcom was offbeat and interesting in its first season, but has since become predictable and stodgy.
received a pompously Victorian letter from his stodgy father

62

stonewall

to be uncooperative, obstructive, or evasive

e.g. stonewall for time
stonewall the media

63

stout

strong of character
physically or materially strong
forceful; also, violent

e.g. a stout heart
a stout defense

64

stowaway

someone who hides on a ship, airplane, etc., in order to travel without paying or being seen

65

strand

to leave in a strange or an unfavorable place especially without funds or means to depart

66

stratum

one of usually many layers of a substance (such as a rock)
a level of society made up of people of the same rank or position

e.g. deep stratum of skin
The lower strata of society have been hit especially hard by this economic downturn.
The level of writing in that pop novel is several strata beneath that of serious fiction.

67

strew

to spread by scattering
disseminate

e.g. strewing the highways with litter

68

strident

characterized by harsh, insistent, and discordant sound
commanding attention by a loud or obtrusive quality

e.g. a strident voice / strident slogans

69

strife

bitter sometimes violent conflict or dissension
exertion or contention for superiority

e.g. In order to avoid family strife
bitter strife between the two political factions