Word List 19 Flashcards Preview

GRE Vocabulary > Word List 19 > Flashcards

Flashcards in Word List 19 Deck (122):
1

hypotenuse

the side of a right-angled triangle that is opposite of the right angle
the length of a hypotenuse

2

hysteria

a psychoneurosis marked by emotional excitability and disturbances of the psychic, sensory, vasomotor, and visceral functions
behavior exhibiting overwhelming or unmanageable gear or emotional excess

e.g. Wartime hysteria led to many unfair accusation of treachery.

3

iconoclast

a person who destroys religious images or opposes their veneration
a person who attacks settled beliefs or institutions

e.g. Notorious as an iconoclast, that music critic isn't afraid to go after sacred cows.

4

idiom

the language peculiar to a people or to a district, community, or class; dialect
an expression in the usage of a language that is peculiar to itself
a style or form of artistic expression that is characteristic; broadly, manner, style

e.g. the modern jazz idiom
a new culinary idiom

5

idle

lacking worth or basis; vain
not occupied or employed
shiftless, lazy; having no evident lawful means of support
to spend time in idleness; to move idly
to make idle

e.g. There has been a lot of idle speculation about what might happen, but no one really knows.
idle pleasure/workers/farmland
She left the engine idling for a few seconds before she turned it off.
workers idled by a strike

6

idolater

a worshiper of idols
a person that admires intensely and often blindly one that is not usually a subject of worship

7

idyllic

pleasing or picturesque in natural simplicity
of, relating to, or being an idyll

e.g. an idyllic retreat in the countryside

8

igneous

of, relating to, or resembling fire; fiery
relating to, resulting from, or suggestive of the intrusion or extrusion of magma or volcanic activity
formed by solidification of magma

e.g. igneous rocks

9

ignoble

of low birth or common origin; plebeian
characterized by baseness, lowness, or meanness

e.g. an ignoble child who would one day grow up to a prince among playwrights
Such an ignoble act is completely unworthy of a military officer.

10

ignominious

marked with or characterized by disgrace or shame; dishonorable
deserving or shame or infamy; despicable
humiliating, degrading

e.g. Some of his friends considered the job of janitor to be ignominious fate for the laid-off executive.
The prison guards degraded themselves with their inhumane, ignominious treatment of the prisoners.

11

ignominy

deep personal humiliation and disgrace
disgraceful or dishonorable conduct, quality, or action

e.g. She had to endure the ignominy of being forced to resign.

12

illegitimate

not recognized as lawful offspring
not rightly deduced or inferred; illogical
departing from the regular; erratic
not sanctioned by law; illegal

e.g. They were fired from their jobs for illegitimate reasons.

13

illicit

not permitted; unlawful

e.g. illicit copes of the software
an illicit affair

14

illiterate

having little or no education; unable to read or write
showing or marked by a lack of familiarity with language and literature
showing or marked by a lack of acquaintance with the fundamentals of a particular field of knowledge

e.g. She is politically illiterate and has never voted in an election.
an illiterate magazine

15

illuminati

(cap.) any of various groups claiming special religious enlightenment
persons who are or who claim to be unusually enlightened
elite

e.g. a book launching party to which only New York's cultural illuminati were invited
members of the academic illuminati

16

imbibe

to receive into the mind and retain
to assimilate or take into solution
drink; to take in or up

e.g. imbibe moral principles
imbibe vast quantities of coffee

17

imbroglio

a confused mess
an intricate or complicated situation; an acutely painful or embarrassing misunderstanding
embroilment; scandal

e.g. a celebrated imbroglio involving some big names in the New York literary scene

18

imbue

to permeate or influence as if by dyeing
to provide with something freely or naturally; endow

e.g. A feeling of optimism imbues her works.
Her training at the school for the deaf imbues her with a sense of purpose that she had never known before.

19

immaculate

having no stain or blemish; pure
containing no flaw or error

e.g. an immaculate record of service

20

macula

spot, blotch; macule
an anatomical structure having the form of a spot differentiated from surrounding tissues; especially, macula lutea

21

immanent

indwelling, inherent
being within the limits of possible experience or knowledge

e.g. Beauty is not something imposed but something immanent.
A question as to whether altruism is immanent in all individuals or is instead acquired from without.

22

immemorial

extending or existing since beyond the reach of memory, record, or tradition

e.g. the immemorial roots of human spirituality
stories passed down from time immemorial

23

immerse

to plunge into something that surrounds or covers; especially, to plunge or dip into a fluid
engross, absorb

e.g. She had immersed herself in writing short stories.

24

imminent

ready to take place; especially, hanging threateningly over one's head

e.g. in imminent danger of being run over
There patients are facing imminent death.

25

immolate

to offer in sacrifice; especially, to kill as a sacrificed victim
to kill or destroy often by fire

e.g. a man who immolated himself as an act of protest
a ceremony in which they immolated their cherished possessions so that the gods would send rain

26

immure

to enclose within or as if within walls; imprison
to build into a wall; especially, to entomb in a wall

e.g. Scientists at the research station in Alaska are immured by the frozen wastelands that surround them.
Immured by a controlling, possessive mother, the young woman had no outside social life.

27

demure

reserved, modest
affectedly modest, reserved, or serious; coy

e.g. the demure charm of the cottage

28

imp

a small demon; fiend
a mischievous child; urchin

e.g. a story about a crumbling mansion infested with a brood of imps

29

demur

to disagree politely with another person's statement or suggestion
to politely refuse to accept a request or suggestion (often used with to or at)

e.g. She suggested that he would win easily, but he demurred, saying he expected the election to be close.
Don't hesitate to demur to the idea if you have any qualms.

30

exception

the act of excepting; exclusion
one that is excepted; especially, a case to which a rule does not apply
question, objection

e.g. There will be no exceptions to this rule.
I take strong exception to your assessment of his singing ability.

31

impair

to damage or make worse by or as if by diminishing in some material respect

e.g. His health was impaired by overwork.

32

impale

to pierce with or as if with something pointed; especially, to torture or kill by fixing on a sharp stake
to fix in an inescapable or helpless position

33

impalpable

incapable of being felt by touch; intangible
so finely divided that no grains or grit can be felt
not readily discerned by the wind

e,g. The rich colors used in the wall coverings and furniture give the room an impalpable warmth.
An difference between the two sounding systems is impalpable to all but the most discerning audiophiles.

34

palpitate

to beat rapidly and strongly; throb

e.g. My heart began to palpitate when I was announced as the winner.

35

impart

to give, convey, or grant fro or as if from a store
to communicate the knowledge of; disclose

e.g. Her presence imparted a sense of importance to the meeting.
impart his scheme to no one

36

impasse

a predicament affording no obvious escape
deadlock
an impassable road or way; cul-de-sac

e.g. An arbitrator was called in to break the impasse.
She had reached an impasse in her career.

37

impassioned

filled with passion or zeal; showing great warmth or intensity of feeling

e.g. an impassioned plea for justice

38

impassive

unsusceptible to physical feeling; insensible
unsusceptible to or destitute of emotion; apathetic
giving no sign of feeling or emotion; expressionless

e.g. Her face remained impassive throughout the trial.

39

overwrought

extremely excited; agitated
elaborated to excess; overdone

e.g. The witness became overwrought as she described the crime.

40

impeach

to bring an accusation against
to charge with a crime or misdemeanor
to remove from office especially for misconduct
to cast doubt on; especially, to challenge the credibility or validity of

e.g. impeach the president
The defense lawyers tried to impeach the witness's testimony by forcing him to admit that he had changed his story.

41

impeccable

not capable of sinning or liable to sin
free from fault or blame; flawless

e.g. spoke impeccable French
The etiquette was celebrated for her absolutely impeccable manners.

42

peccadillo

a slight offense

43

impecunious

having very little or no money usually habitually; penniless

e.g. They were so impecunious that they couldn't afford to give one another even token Christmas gifts.

44

peculate

embezzle

45

pecuniary

consisting of or measured in money
of or relating to money

e.g. That makes good pecuniary sense.
The judge recused himself from the case because he had a pecuniary interest in the company that was being sued.

46

impediment

- impede

e.g. It is tough going for the burros on the canyon trail, even without the added impediment of heavy loads.

47

impel

to urge or drive forward or on by or as if by the exertion of strong moral pressure; force
to impart motion to; propel

e.g. She felt impelled to give a speech after the performance.

48

impend

to hover threatening; menace
to be about to occur

e.g. For confirmed pessimists, some disaster always seems to be impending.

49

impenetrable

incapable of being penetrated or pierced
inaccessible to knowledge, reason, or sympathy; impervious
incapable of being comprehended; inscrutable

50

impenitent

not penitent ; not feeling or expressing humble or regretful pain or sorrow for sins or offenses

e.g. an impenitent criminal who said he'd do it all over again, given the chance

51

rueful

exciting pity or sympathy; pitiable
mournful, regretful

e.g. rueful squalid poverty by every wayside
troubled her with a rueful disquiet

52

imperative

expressive of a command, entreaty, or exhortation
having power to restrain, control, and direct
not to be avoided or evaded; necessary

e.g. an imperative duty

53

imperator

a commander in chief or emperor of the ancient Romans

54

imperial

of, relating to, befitting, or suggestive of an empire or an emperor
sovereign; regal, imperious
of superior or unusual size or excellence

e.g. a member of the imperial family
envisioned an imperial city that would rival the capitals of Europe for beauty and magnificence

55

imperious

befitting or characteristic of one of eminent rank or attainments; commanding, dominant
marked by arrogant assurance; domineering
intensely compelling; urgent

e.g. an imperious movie star who thinks she's some sort of princess

56

impersonate

to assume or act the character of; personate

e.g. a comedian with a talent for impersonating famous politicians and actors

57

impertinence

irrelevance, inappropriateness
incivility, insolence
an instance of impertinence

e.g. A disciplinarian of the old school, he refused to tolerate any impertinence from his children.
the impertinence of deliberately ignoring waiting customers while they finished their conversation

58

imperturbable

marked by extreme calm, impassivity, and steadiness; serene

e.g. Although he seems outwardly imperturbable, he can get very angry at times.

59

restive

stubbornly resisting control; balky
marked by impatience or uneasiness; fidgety

e.g. The restive horse threw his head and refused to move when the rider urged it forward.
spend a restive night worrying about the next day's exam

60

impervious

not allowing entrance or passage; impenetrable
not capable of being damaged or harmed
not capable of being affected or disturbed

e.g. a coat impervious to rain
a carpet impervious to rough treatment
a man impervious to criticism
The rain forest is impervious to all but the most dedicated explorers.

61

impetuous

marked by impulsive vehemence or passion
marked by force and violence of movement or action

e.g. an impetuous temperament
an impetuous wind

62

impetus

a driving force; impulse, incentive, stimulus

e.g. His discoveries have given impetus to further research.
The reward money should be enough impetus for someone to come forward with information about the robbery.

63

impinge

to strike or dash especially with a sharp collision
to have an effect; make an impression
encroach, infringe

e.g. I heard the rain impinge upon the earth.
waiting for the gem of a new idea to impinge upon my wind
impinge on other people's rights

64

implant

to fix or set securely or deeply
to set permanently in the consciousness or habit patterns; inculcate

e.g. a hearing aid surgically implanted in the ear
a music teacher who stove to implant within his students a love of the classics

65

implausible

not plausible; provoking disbelief

e.g. He gave an implausible excuse for showing up late for work.

66

verisimilar

having the appearance of truth; probable
depicting realism

67

replete

fully or abundantly provided or filled
fat, stout; complete

e.g. a book replete with delicious details

68

implicate

to involve as a consequence, corollary, or natural inference; imply
to bring into intimate or incriminating connection
to involve in the nature or operation of something

e.g. His business partner was implicated in the theft.

69

implicit

capable of being understood from something else though unexpressed; implied
involved in the nature or essence of something though not revealed, expressed, or developed; potential
being without doubt or reserve; unquestioning

e.g. There is a sense of moral duty implicit in her writings.
A sculptor may see different figures implicit in a block of stones.
I have implicit trust in her honesty.

70

implode

to burst inward
to undergo violent compression; to collapse inward as if from external pressure; also, to become greatly reduced as if from collapsing
to break down or fall apart from within; self-destruct

e.g. a controlled demolition during which the entire building imploded in a matter of seconds
The firm imploded from greed and factionalism.

71

implore

to call upon in supplication; beseech
to call or pray for earnestly; entreat

e.g. implored the crowd to be quiet

72

deplore

to feel or express grief for; to regret strongly
to consider unfortunate or deserving of deprecation

e.g. Many critics deplore his methods.

73

impolitic

not politic; unwise

74

imponderable

not ponderable; incapable of being weighed or evaluated with exactness

e.g. the imponderable beauties of Beethoven's sonatas

75

import

to bear or convey as meaning or portent; signify
imply
importance; especially, relative importance
purport, signification

76

importune

troublesomely urgent; overly persistent in request or demand; troublesome; importunate
to press or urge with troublesome persistence
annoy, trouble

e.g. He stood on the street corner, importuning passersby for help.

77

dispose

to give a tendency to; incline
to put in place; set in readiness; arrange
bestow

e.g. Faulty diet disposes one to sickness.
disposing troops for withdrawal

78

imposing

impressive in size, bearing, dignity, or grandeur

e.g. The president of the back is exactly the sort of imposing figure that one might expect.

79

impostor

one that assumes false identity or title for the purpose of deception

80

imposture

the act or practice of deceiving by means of an assumed character or name
an instance of imposture

e.g. He was accused of imposture.

81

impoverish

to make poor
to deprive of strength, richness, or fertility, by depleting or draining of something essential

e.g. Poor farming practices impoverished the soil.

82

impregnable

incapable of being taken by assault; unconquerable
unassailable; also, impenetrable

e.g. an impregnable fortress that had foiled one invader after another over the centuries

83

impresario

the promoter, manager, or conductor of an opera or concert
a person who puts on or sponsors an entertainment (as a television show or sports event)
manager, director

84

impressionable

capable of being easily influenced

e.g. The teacher was accused of forcing his political beliefs on impressionable teenagers.

85

improvident

not provident; not foreseeing and providing for the future

e.g. the improvident view that the wearing away of the ozone layer need not concern us
Her improvident habits left her with no retirement savings.

86

imprudent

not prudent; lacking discretion, wisdom, or good judgment

e.g. It's politically imprudent to stir up such controversy during an election year.
a very sweet girl, but so imprudent that no one trusts her with a secret

87

impudent

marked by contemptuous or cocky boldness or disregard of others; insolent

e.g. the guest's impudent inquiries about the cost of just about everything we had in the house

88

impugn

to assail by words or arguments; oppose or attack as false or lacking integrity

e.g. He impugned his rival's character.

89

pugnacious

having a quarrelsome or combative nature; truculent

e.g. There's one pugnacious member on the committee who won't agree to anything.

90

impuissance

weakness, powerlessness

91

vindicate

avenge
to free from allegation or blame; to provide justification or defense for; justify
confirm, substantiate
to maintain a right to

e.g. These discoveries vindicate their theory.
She will be completely vindicated by the evidence.

92

impunity

exemption or freedom from punishment, harm, or loss

e.g. She mistakenly believed that she could insult people with impunity
Law were flouted with impunity.

93

punitive

inflicting, involving, or aiming at punishment

e.g. The federal government will take punitive actions against the company that polluted the river.

94

inadvertent

not focusing the mind on a matter; inattentive
unintentional

e.g. an inadvertent omission
an inadvertent encounter with a rattlesnake in the brush

95

inalienable

incapable of being alienated, surrendered, or transferred

e.g. inalienable rights

96

inane

empty, insubstantial
lacking significance, meaning, or point; silly

e.g. The film's plot is inane and full of cliches.

97

inanity

- inane

e.g. the jaw-dropping inanity of the singer's comments on the awards show

98

inanimate

not endowed with life or spirit
lacking consciousness or power of motion
not animated or lively; dull

e.g. "Pathetic fallacy" is the literary term for the ascription of human feelings or motives to inanimate natural elements.

99

inappreciable

to small to be perceived

e.g. an inappreciable change in the temperature

100

inaugurate

to induct into an office with suitable ceremonies
to dedicate ceremoniously; observe formally the beginning of
to bring about the beginning of

e.g. inaugurate a new school
inaugurated the college's athletic program for women

101

augury

divination from auspices or omens; also, an instance of this
omen, portent

e.g. Some people believe that a broken mirror is an augury of seven years' bad luck.

102

inborn

present from or as if from birth
hereditary, inherited

e.g. an inborn talent for music

103

incandescent

white, glowing, or luminous with intense heat
marked by brilliance especially of expression
characterized by glowing zeal; ardent

e.g. the incandescent coals of our campfire
a speaker incandescent with righteous anger over the treatment of the refugees
incandescent wit

104

incantation

a use of spells or verbal charms spoken or sung as a part of ritual or magic; also, a written or recited formula of words designed to produce a particular effect

105

incarcerate

to put in prison
to subject to confinement

106

incarnate

invested with bodily and especially human nature and form
made manifest or comprehensible; embodied
red; incarnadine
also

e.g. a fiend incarnate
No one culture incarnates every important human value.
the general view that Hitler incarnated extreme egotism and indeed evil itself

107

carnage

the flesh of slain animals or men
great and usually bloody slaughter or injury (as in battle)

108

carnal

relating to or given to crude bodily pleasures and appetites
bodily, corporeal; worldly

e.g. The preacher warned that those who were interested only in carnal pursuits would not see the kingdom of heaven.
a missionary who tends to the carnal needs of the people as well as to their spiritual concerns

109

incendiary

a person who commits arson; arsonist
a substance or weapon used to start fires
a person who excites factions, quarrels, or sedition; agitator
also
extremely hot

e.g. incendiaries who were intent on overthrowing the government
reckless incendiary remarks during a period of heightened racial tensions
incendiary chili peppers

110

incense

pleasing attention; flattery
to arouse the extreme anger or indignation

e.g. count on the office manager to spread the incense whenever there's a visiting VIP from the headquarter

111

propitiate

to gain or regain the favor or goodwill of; appease

e.g. The temple was once the site of sacrifices - both to honor the gods in times of plenty and to propitiate them in times of trouble.

112

inception

an act, process, or instance of beginning; commencement

e.g. The project has been shrouded in controversy from its inception.
from inception to completion

113

incessant

continuing or following without interruption; unceasing

e.g. The incessant noise from an outside repair crew was a real distraction during the test.

114

inchoate

not completely formed or developed yet; incipient, formless, incoherent

e.g. inchoate feelings of affection for a man whom she had, up till now, thought of as only a friend

115

incipient

beginning to come into being or to become apparent

e.g. an incipient solar system
I have an incipient dislike and distrust of that guy, and I only met his this morning

116

incise

to cut into
to carve figures, letters, or devices into; engrave

e.g. The clay is incised to create a design.

117

incisive

impressively direct and decisive (as in manner or presentation)

e.g. an incisive analysis
an incisive unsentimental writer
She's known for her incisive mind and quick wit.

118

inclement

physically severe; stormy
(archaic) severe in temper or action; unmerciful

e.g. The weather reporter warned that the holiday weekend would be spoiled by inclement weather.

119

incogitant

thoughtless, inconsiderate
not having the faculty of thought

e.g. incogitant litterbugs

120

incommensurate

lacking a basis or comparison in respect to a quality normally subject to comparison; incommensurable
inadequate
disproportionate

e.g. a confidence incommensurate with their ability

121

cogitate

to ponder or meditate (on) usually intently

e.g. cogitate about chances of failing
cogitate on her career plans

122

inconsequential

illogical
irrelevant
of no significance; unimportant

e.g. an inconsequential problem compared to the other issues
an inconsequential error that does nothing to lessen the value of the report