Word List 1 Flashcards Preview

GRE Vocabulary > Word List 1 > Flashcards

Flashcards in Word List 1 Deck (98):
1

abash

to make embarrassed

e.g. She felt terribly abashed when she walked into the wrong hotel room.

2

embolden

to make (someone) more confident

3

abate

to reduce in degree or intensity; wane

e.g. abate their rancor to win peace

4

abdicate

to cast off; discard
to relinquish (as sovereign power) formally

5

aberrant

deviating from the right, usual, normal way; atypical

6

abet

to actively encourage (as an activity or plan)
to assist or support in the achievement of a purpose

e.g. He abetted the commission of a crime.
She abetted the thief in his getaway.

7

abeyance

temporary inactivity; suspension

e.g. Plans are held in abeyance.

8

abhor

to regard with extreme repugnance

9

abide

to endure without yielding; withstand
to bear patiently; tolerate

e.g. I cannot abide such bigots.

10

abject

miserable; wretched
degraded; base

11

abjure

to give up on oath

12

renounce

to give up by formal declaration

e.g. He renounced his old way of life.

13

recant

to withdraw or repudiate formally and publicly; renounce

e.g. Witnesses threatened to recant their testimony when the court released their names to the paper.

14

ablution

the washing of one's body or part of it (as in religious ritual)

15

abnegate

deny; renounce
surrender; relinquish

e.g. He abnegated all claims to the deceased lord's domain.
If the Congress adopted these security measures, it would be abnegating the nation's fundamental commitment to individual rights.

16

abolish

to officially end or stop

17

abolitionism

principles or measures fostering abolition especially of slavery

18

aboveboard

honest(ly) and open(ly)

e.g. an aboveboard and responsible proposal

19

surreptitious

done, made, or acquired by stealth; clandestine

e.g. a private investigator adept at taking surreptitious pictures of adulterous couples

20

abrade

to scrape or rub off

e.g. The prisoner's manacles abraded his wrists and ankles until they bled.

21

abrasive

causing irritation; irritating
tending to abrade

e.g. The waves had an abrasive action on the rocks.
an abrasive display of rude behavior

22

abreast

side by side

e.g. keep abreast of current affairs

23

abridge

to reduce in scope or extent
to shorten; condense

e.g. abridge a dictionary by omitting rare words
attempts to abridge the right of free speech

24

abrogate

to repeal by authority; abolish

e.g. The Congress can abrogate old treaties that are unfair to Native Americans.

25

abscission

removal
the natural separation of flowers, fruit, or leaves from plants

26

abscond

to depart secretly and hide oneself

e.g. Several prisoners absconded to Canada.

27

absenteeism

frequent absence from school or work

28

recondite

not understood or known by many people

e.g. Geochemistry is a recondite subject.

29

absolve

to set free from guilt, responsibility
forgive

e.g. No amount of remorse will absolve shoplifters who are caught.

30

inculpate

incriminate; to charge with involvement in a crime or fault

31

abstain

to refrain deliberately and often with an effort of self-denial from an action or practice

e.g. abstain from drinking

32

abstinence

- abstain

33

abstention

the act or practice of abstaining

34

abstemious

marked by restraint especially in the consumption of food or alcohol

e.g. Being abstemious diners, they avoid restaurants with buffets.

35

abstruse

difficult to understand

36

patent

obvious; clear

37

abut

to border upon

e.g. Our land abuts a nature preserve, so we see a lot of wildlife.

38

abysmal

having immense or fathomless extension
immeasurably great; profound
immeasurably low or wretched

e.g. an abysmal cliff
abysmal ignorance
abysmal living conditions of the poor

39

accede

to agree to a request or a demand
to express approval or give consent

e.g. He finally acceded to their pleas for more time to complete the project.

40

accentuate

to pronounce with an accent or stress
to emphasize

41

accessible

easy to approach
open to influences

e.g. accessible to new ideas

42

acclaim

applaud; praise

e.g. She has long been acclaimed by the critics for her realistic acting.

43

accolade

approval; appreciation
words of praise

e.g. For their exceptional bravery, the firefighters received accolades from both local and national officials.

44

accommodating

willing to please; obliging

e.g. an accommodating waiter who readily honored our request to make substitutions

45

accomplice

partner in crime

46

duplicity

contradictory doubleness of though, speech, or action (especially belying of one's true intentions by deceptive words or actions)

47

accord

to bring into agreement; reconcile
agreement; conformity

e.g. He claims that the newspaper's quote does not accord with what he actually said.
The two sides were able to reach an accord.

48

accost

to approach and speak to often in a challenging or aggressive way

e.g. She was so famous that people would accost her on the street and ask for an autograph.

49

accrete

to grow or become attached by accretion
to cause to adhere or become attached

e.g. silt accreting at the mouth of the river over time

50

accrue

to increase in value or amount gradually

e.g. investments that have accrued interest and dividends

51

acerbic

acid in temper, mood, or tone

e.g. acerbic commentary
an acerbic reviewer

52

acme

the highest point; peak; summit

e.g. His fame was at its acme.

53

acolyte

one who follows and admires a leader
someone who helps the person leading a church service

54

acorn

an oak nut

55

acoustic

having to do with hearing or sound

56

acquaint

to cause to know personally
to make familiar

e.g. This class is designed to acquaint students with the region's most important writers.
He was acquainted with the mayor.

57

acquiesce

to accept, comply, or submit tacitly or passively

e.g. He passively acquired the reputation of being a snob, and acquiesced to it.

58

acquisitive

strongly desirous of acquiring and possessing; greedy

e.g. Acquisitive developers are trying to tear down the historic home and build a shopping mall.

59

acquit

to declare (someone) to be not guilty
to discharge completely as from an obligation
to pay off (as a claim or debt)

e.g. The jury acquitted the defendant of the robbery charge.

60

acquittal

a setting free from the charge of an offense

61

acrid

bitterly pungent; sharp
deeply or violently bitter

e.g. acrid smoke
acrid relations between two families

62

acrimony

harsh sharpness especially or words, manner, or disposition

e.g. The dispute began again with increased acrimony.

63

acrophobia

fear or heights

64

acuity

keenness of perception

e.g. a worrisome deterioration in the acuity of his hearing over the years

65

acumen

keenness and depth of perception

e.g. Her political acumen won her the election.

66

acute

sharp and severe;
keen; shrewd; sensitive

e.g. acute pain/disease/hospitals
an acute thinker/sense of humor
a politically acute film that does not oversimplify the issues

67

adage

an old saying accepted as a truth

68

adamant

unshakable or insistent especially in maintaining a position or opinion; determined

e.g. He is adamant about staying there after we tried to talk him into coming with us.

69

ineptitude

a lack of skill or ability

e.g. The team's poor play is being blamed on the ineptitude of the coaching staff.

70

aptitude

a natural ability to do or learn something

e.g. a test to measure the aptitudes of the students
bored teenagers with an aptitude for getting into trouble

71

addendum

a thing added; addition
a supplement to a book

72

adept

thoroughly proficient; expert

e.g. adept in several languages/ at fixing cars

73

equable

tending to remain calm; free from sudden or harsh changes

e.g. equable climate

74

adjourn

to suspend indefinitely or until a later stated time

75

adjunct

something joined or added to another thing but not essentially part of it

e.g. Massage therapy can be used as an adjunct with to the medication.

76

admonish

to express warning or disapproval to especially in a gentle, earnest, or solicitous manner
to give friendly earnest advice or encouragement to

e.g. They were admonished to take the advantage of the opportunity.
My physician is always admonishing me to eat more healthy food.

77

admonitory

- admonish; warning

78

adobe

a brick of sun-dried earth and straw

79

abode

the place where one abides (lives)

80

oration

a formal speech

81

inexorable

not to be persuaded, moved, or stopped; relentless

e.g. inexorable progress

82

adorn

decorate; beautify

e.g. Her paintings adorn the walls.

83

suborn

to induce secretly to do an unlawful thing
to obtain (perjured testimony) from a witness

e.g. He is accused of suborning a witness.

84

adroit

very clever or skillful; expert

e.g. adroit at handling problems
With an adroit flick of the wrist, he flipped the omelet in the air and landed it squarely back in the pan.

85

adulate

to praise or flatter excessively

86

scorn

reject or dismiss as contemptible or unworthy
to show disdain

e.g. Her actions were scorned by many people.
They were scorned as fanatics.

87

adumbrate

to foreshadow vaguely; intimate
to suggest, disclose, or outline partially

e.g. The strife in Bloody Kansas in the 1850s adumbrated the civil war that would follow.
adumbrate a plan

88

advent

a coming into being or use

e.g. the advent of spring/pasteurization/computers

89

adventitious

happening or carried on according to chance rather than design or inherent nature; unplanned
coming from outside; not native

e.g. My adventures were always adventitious, always thrust on me.
He felt that the conversation was not entirely adventitious.

90

adverse

bad or unfavorable
acting against or in a contrary direction

e.g. adverse criticism/drug effects
hindered by adverse winds

91

aegis

shield
protection
sponsorship

e.g. Having no claim to the land under the aegis of the law, the cattle baron decided to claim it by force.
A medical study was questioned by many because it was done under the aegis of a major pharmaceutical company.

92

aerate

to cause air to circulate through

93

aesthete

connoisseur; virtuoso
(aesthetics)

e.g. He regards art critics as a bunch of pretentious aesthetes.

94

philistine

a person guided by materialism and usually disdainful of intellectual or artistic values
one uninformed in a special area of knowledge

95

affable

pleasant and easy to approach or talk to; gentle; amiable

96

ineffable

incapable of being expressed in words
unspeakable; not to be uttered

e.g. ineffable joy/disgust
the ineffable name of Jehovah

97

irascible

marked by hot temper and easily provoked anger

98

affectation

artificial behavior meant to impress others

e.g. His French accent is just an affectation.