Word List 23 Flashcards Preview

GRE Vocabulary > Word List 23 > Flashcards

Flashcards in Word List 23 Deck (109):
1

lucid

suffused with light; luminous; translucent
having full use of one's faculties; sane
clear to the understanding; intelligible

e.g. He is able to recognize his wife in his lucid moments.
those lucid bands that spread across the arctic sky and are known as the northern lights

2

murky

characterized by a heavy dimness or obscurity caused by or like that caused by overhanging fog or smoke
characterized by thickness and heaviness of air; foggy, misty
darkly vague or obscure

e.g. She peered into one of the church's murky chapels.
a politician with a murky past
murky official rhetoric

3

lucrative

producing wealth; profitable

4

ludicrous

amusing or laughable through obvious absurdity, incongruity, exaggeration, or eccentricity
meriting derisive laughter or scorn as absurdly inept, false, or foolish

e.g. a ludicrous and easily detected attempt to forge his father's signature on a note to school

5

lug

drag, pull
to carry laboriously
to introduce in a forced manner

e.g. lugged the bags to the car
lugs my name into the argument

6

lukewarm

moderately warm; tepid
lacking conviction; halfhearted

e.g. lukewarm support/reception

7

lull

to cause to sleep or rest; soothe
to cause to relax vigilance
a temporary pause or decline in activity

e.g. lulled into a false sense of security
We took the opportunity of a lull in conversation to announce that we were engaged.
the early-morning lull in urban noise

8

lumber

to move ponderously
rumble
surplus or disused articles that are stored away
timber or logs especially when dressed for use

9

lumen

the cavity of a tubular organ or part
a unit of luminous flux equal to the light emitted in a unit solid angle by a uniform point source of one candle intensity

10

luminary

a person of prominence or brilliant achievement
a body that gives light; especially, one of the celestial bodies

e.g. luminaries of the art world

11

lunule

a crescent-shaped body part or marking (as the whitish mark at the base of a fingernail)

12

lurch

a sudden roll of a ship to one side
an abrupt jerking, swaying, or tipping movement; also, stagger
to roll or tip abruptly; pitch
to move with a lurch; also, stagger

e.g. suddenly lurched forward
has lurched from crisis to crisis

13

lurid

causing horror or revulsion; gruesome
melodramatic, sensational; also, shocking
wan and ghastly pale in appearance
shining with the red glow of fire seen through smoke or cloud

e.g. a lurid tale of violence and betrayal
the lurid lighting of a nightclub
The light from the fire cast a lurid glow on everything.

14

lurk

to lie in wait in a place of concealment especially for an evil purpose
to move furtively or inconspicuously
to constitute a latent threat

e.g. She could tell there was someone out there lurking in the shadows.

15

lush

growing vigorously especially with luxuriant foliage
characterized by abundance; plentiful
prosperous, profitable
savory, delicious; appealing to senses
opulent, sumptuous

e.g. The frequent rainfall encourages the lush growth of trees, ferns, and shrubs.
the lush sound of the orchestra
lush accommodations

16

sere

being dried and withered

e.g. a sere region that can't support agriculture

17

wanderlust

strong longing for or impulse toward wandering

18

lustrous

reflecting light evenly and efficiently without glitter or sparkle
radiant in character or reputation; illustrious

e.g. The lustrous finish on the satin bedspread adds to the feeling of luxury.

19

lyric

of, relating to, or being drama set to music; especially, operatic
expressing direct usually intense personal emotion especially in a manner suggestive of song
exuberant, rhapsodic

e.g. The film's lyric photography really enhanced its romantic mood.

20

macabre

having death as a subject; comprising or including a personalized representation of death
dwelling on the gruesome
tending to produce horror in a beholder

e.g. a macabre story of murder and madness

21

macerate

to cause to waste away by or as if by excessive fasting
to cause to become soft or separated into constituent elements by or as if by steeping in fluid; broadly, steep, soak

e.g. garnished with cherries that had been macerated in liqueur
Those who macerate the body, and long to put on longevity, are only in a kind of dream.

22

machination

the act to plan or plot especially to do harm
a scheming or crafty action or artful design intended to accomplish some usually evil end

e.g. incredibly complicated machinations to assassinate the president that inevitably failed
backstage machinations that have dominated the film industry

23

maculated

marked with spots; blotched
impure, besmirched

24

madrigal

a short poem, often about love, suitable for being set to music
a type of song for several singers without instruments that was popular in the 16th or 17th centuries

25

maelstrom

a powerful often violent whirlpool sucking in objects within a given radius
something resembling a maelstrom in turbulence

e.g. a maelstrom of emotions

26

magenta

a bright, deep purplish-red color
also

27

magisterial

of, relating to, or having the characteristic of a master or teacher; authoritative
marked by an overbearingly dignified or assured manner or aspect
of or relating to a magistrate or a magistrate's office or duties

e.g. He spoke with a magisterial tone.

28

magnanimous

showing or suggesting a loft and courageous spirit
showing or suggesting nobility of feeling and generosity of mind

e.g. too sincere for dissimulation, too magnanimous for resentment
the irreproachable lives and magnanimous sufferings of their followers
a magnanimous donation

29

magnate

a person of rank, power, influence, or distinction often in a specified area

e.g. a studio magnate who had the biggest stars in Hollywood at his beck and call

30

magpie

a noisy black-and-white bird
a person who chatters noisily
one who collects indiscriminately

e.g. Media magpies will no doubt seize upon the president's latest gaffe and blow if all out of proportion.

31

maize

Indian corn

32

maladroit

lacking adroitness; inept

e.g. The government has been criticized for his maladroit handling of the budget crisis.
Some maladroit steering on her part caused the bicycle to go crashing into the bushes.

33

malaise

an indefinite feeling of debility or lack of health often indicative of or accompanying the onset of an illness
a vague sense of mental or moral ill-being

e.g. An infected person will fell a general malaise.
The country's current economic problems are symptoms of a deeper malaise
a malaise of cynicism and despair

34

malapropism

the usually unintentionally humorous misuse or distortion of a word or phrase; especially, the use of a word sounding somewhat like the one intended but ludicrously wrong in the context

35

malcontent

a discontented person
dissatisfied with the existing state of affairs; discontented

e.g. He complained so much that he got a reputation for being a malcontent.
She seems like a very malcontent person, always acting as if the entire world were out to get her.

36

malevolent

having, showing, or arising from intense often vicious ill will, spite, or hatred
productive of harm or evil

e.g. The novel grossly oversimplified the conflict as a struggle between relentlessly malevolent villains on one side and faultless saints on the other.

37

malfeasance

wrongdoing or misconduct especially by a public official

e.g. The investigation has uncovered evidence of corporate malfeasance.

38

malice

desire to cause pain, injury, or distress to another
intent to commit an unlawful act or cause harm without legal justification or excuse

e.g. an attack motivated by pure malice
She claimed that her criticisms were without malice.

39

malign

evil in nature, influence, or effect; injurious
malignant, virulent
having or showing intense often vicious ill will; malevolent
to utter injuriously misleading or false reports about; speak evil of

e.g. Both parties to the divorce showed a malign desire to make each other's future life utterly miserable.
Her supporters say she is being unfairly maligned in the press.

40

malinger

to pretend or exaggerate incapacity or illness (as to avoid duty or work)

e.g. His boss suspected him of malingering because of his frequent absences from work.

41

malleable

capable of being extended or shaped; also, capable of being altered or controlled by outside forces or influences
having a capacity for adaptive change

e.g. The cult leader took advantage of the malleable, compliant personalities of his followers.

42

mallet

a hammer with a typically barrel-shaped head

43

mammoth

of very great size

e.g. Renovating the house is a mammoth undertaking.
a mammoth book

44

mandate

an authoritative command
an authorization to act given to a representative
to administer or assign under a mandate
to officially require; make (something) mandatory
to direct or require (someone) to do something

e.g. They carried out the governor's mandate to build more roads.
He won the election so convincingly that he believed he had been given a mandate for change.
a law mandating recycling
a commission mandated to investigate corruption

45

mangle

to injure with deep disfiguring wounds by cutting, tearing, or crushing
to spoil, injure, or make incoherent especially through ineptitude

e.g. people mangled by sharks
a story mangled beyond recognition

46

wangle

to resort to trickery or devious methods
to adjust or manipulate for personal or fraudulent ends
to make or get by devious means; finagle

e.g. He wangled a free ticket to the show.
He managed to wangle his way into the party.

47

manifest

readily perceived by the senses and especially by the sense of sight
easily understood or recognized by the mind; obvious
to make evident or certain by showing or displaying
manifestation, indication
manifesto
a list of passengers or an invoice of cargo for a vehicle

e.g. Their sadness was manifest in their faces.
There was manifest confusion in the streets.
Both sides have manifested a stubborn unwillingness to compromise.

48

manifesto

a written statement declaring publicly the intentions, motives, or views of its issuer

e.g. The group's manifesto focused on helping the poor and stopping violence.

49

manifold

marked by diversity or variety; many
comprehending or uniting various features; multifarious
rightfully so-called for many reasons
consisting of or operating many of one kind combined

e.g. The benefits of this approach are manifold.
The manifold attractions of that state make it an ideal destination for a family vacation.
a manifold liar

50

mannered

having manners of a specified kind
having an artificial or stilted character

e.g. well-mannered
passages no mannered as to be unintelligible

51

mantle

cloak; also, a figurative cloak symbolizing preeminence or authority
something that covers, enfolds, or envelops
to cover with or as if with a mantle; cloak

e.g. She accepted the mantle of leadership.
a long black velvet mantle
Early-morning fog mantled the fields along the river.
her rich face mantling with emotion

52

manumit

to release from slavery

e.g. manumit slaves

53

manure

to enrich (land) by the application of manure
material that fertilizes land; especially, refuse of stables and barnyards consisting of livestock excreta with or without litter

e.g. fertilizers made from animal manures

54

mar

to detract from the perfection or wholeness of; spoil
something that mars; blemish

e.g. The noise marred the peace of the night.
The Johnsons complained to the movers about broken dishes and mars on the furniture.

55

mare

a female horse or other equine animal especially when fully mature or of breeding age

56

margarine

a food product made usually from vegetable oils churned with ripened skim milk to a smooth emulsion and used like butter

57

marionette

a puppet that is moved by pulling strings or wires that are attached to its body

58

marital

of or relating to marriage or the married stage

e.g. marital vows

59

maritime

of, relating to, or bordering on the sea
of or relating to navigation or commerce on the sea
having the characteristic of a mariner

e.g. a maritime province
The country's maritime industry is an important part of its economy.
maritime law

60

marked

having an identifying mark
having a distinctive or emphasized character
enjoying fame or notoriety
being an object of attack, suspicion, or vengeance

e.g. He speaks with a marked accent.
a marked change/improvement

61

marsh

a tract of soft wet land usually characterized by monocotyledons (as grasses or cattails)

e.g. The marshes along the coast support a remarkable profusion of plants and animals.

62

marshal

the head of a division or a department
an officer of the highest rank in some military forces
to bring together and order in an appropriate or effective way
to lead ceremoniously or solicitously; usher

e.g. She carefully marshaled her thoughts before answering the question.
marshling her little group of children down the street

63

marsupial

a type of animal (such as a kangaroo or an opossum) that carries its babies in a pocket of skin on the mother's stomach
also

64

martial

of, relating to, or suited for war or a warrior
relating to an army or to military life
experienced in or inclined to war; warlike

e.g. one of the basic tenets of martial law

65

martyr

a person who sacrifices something of great value and especially life itself for the sake of principle
victim; especially, a great or constant sufferer

e.g. a martyr to asthma all his life

66

mason

a skilled worker who builds by laying units of substantial material (as stone or brick)

67

masquerade

a social gathering of persons wearing masks and often fantastic costume; a costume for wear at such
an action or appearance that is mere disguise or show
to disguise oneself; also, to go about disguised

e.g. Although she was deeply bored, she maintained a masquerade of polite interest as her guest droned on.
masquerading under a false name

68

mast

a long pole or spar rising from the keel or deck f a ship supporting the yards, booms, and rigging
a slender vertical or nearly vertical structure

69

masticate

to grind or crush (food) with or as if with the teeth; chew
to soften or reduce to pulp by crushing or kneading

e.g. mindlessly masticating peanuts while watching the baseball game on TV

70

materialize

to make material; objectify
to cause to appear in bodily form
to cause to be materialistic

e.g. A waiter suddenly materialized beside our table.
an idea materialized into words

71

nascent

coming or having recently come into existence

e.g. The actress is now focusing on her nascent singing career.

72

maul

beat, bruise
mangle
to handle roughly

e.g. A bear killed one hiker and badly mauled the other.
demonstrators who claimed that they had been mauled by the police

73

mauve

a light or medium purple color
also

74

maven

one who is experienced or knowledgeable; expert
an ardent enthusiast; freak

e.g. An investment maven, he was doing well even when the market was doing poorly.
a science-fiction maven who could talk for hours about fictional technology

75

maverick

an unorthodox or independent-minded person
an unbranded calf or yearling
unorthodox

e.g. a maverick among Connecticut Republicans
a maverick detective

76

mawkish

having an insipid often unpleasant taste
sickly or puerilely sentimental

e.g. a mawkish for donations to charity

77

meager

having little flesh; thin
lacking desirable qualities (as richness or strength)
deficient in quality or quantity

e.g. a meager breakfast of toast of coffee
She came to this country with a fairly meager English vocabulary, but she is learning more words every day.

78

meander

to follow a winding or intricate course
to wander aimlessly or casually without urgent destination; ramble

e.g. The path meanders through the garden.
The conversation meandered on for hours.

79

measly

infected with measles
contemptibly small

e.g. She complained about being given such a measly raise.
All I want is a few measly minutes of your time.

80

measured

marked by due proportion
deliberate, calculated

e.g. a measured response

81

meddle

to interest oneself in what is not one's concern; interfere without right or propriety

e.g. meddle in other people's marriages

82

medley

a diverse assortment or mixture; especially, hodgepodge

e.g. a medley of different ideas

83

meek

enduring injury with patience and without resentment; mild
deficient in spirit and courage; submissive
not violent or strong; moderate

e.g. a meek child dominated by his brother

84

vaunt

to make a vain display of one's own worth or attainments; brag

e.g. people who vaunt their ingenuity

85

meet

precisely adapted to a particular situation, need, or circumstances; very proper

e.g. In this case, splitting the winnings of the contested lottery ticket seems like a meet solution.

86

meld

merge, blend

e.g. Clouds and grey sea melded and a steady rain began.

87

mellifluous

having a smooth rich flow
filled with something (as honey) that sweetens

e.g. a rich, mellifluous voice that gets her a lot of work in radio and TV commercials

88

melodrama

a work (as a movie or play) characterized by extravagant theatricality and by the predominance of plot and physical action over characterization
something resembling a melodrama especially in having sensational or theatrical quality

e.g. Critics dismissed his work as melodrama.

89

melodramatic

emotional in a way that is very extreme or exaggerated; extremely dramatic or emotional

e.g. Our office drama queen yet again made the melodramatic declaration that he was contemplating suicide.

90

menace

a show of intention to inflict harm; threat
one that represents a threat; danger
to make a show of intention to harm
to represent or pose a threat to; endanger

e.g. There was an atmosphere of menace in the city.
She could hear the menace in his voice.
stockpiles of nuclear weapons that continue to menace the inhabitants of this planet

91

mend

to free from faults or defects
to make amends or atonement for

e.g. spends the weekend mending political fences
Her arm mended slowly after surgery.
Least said, soonest mended.

92

mendacious

given to characterized by deception or falsehood or divergence from absolute truth

e.g. The tabloid routinely publishes the most moronically mendacious stories about celebrities.

93

mendicant

beggar
also

e.g. those wretched mendicants on the streets of Calcutta

94

menthol

a crystalline alcohol C10H20O that occurs especially in mint oils and has the odor and cooling properties of peppermint

95

mercantile

of or relating to merchants or trading
of, relating to, or having the characteristics of mercantilism

e.g. mercantile system

96

mercenary

one that serves merely for wages
serving merely for pay or sordid advantage; venal; also, greedy
hired for service in the army of a foreign country

e.g. an army of foreign mercenaries
His motives in choosing a career were purely mercenary.

97

mercurial

characterized by rapid and unpredictable changeableness of mood
animated; lively; sprightly; quick-witted

e.g. a mercurial temper

98

meretricious

of or relating to a prostitute; having the nature of prostitution
tawdrily and falsely attractive
superficially significant; pretentious

e.g. The paradise they found was a piece of meretricious trash.
There is nothing showy or clever, nothing cheap or meretricious in their work.

99

merit

to be worthy of or entitled or liable to; earn
deserve

e.g. Both ideas merit further consideration.
His good work merits a raise.

100

merited

deserving, worthy of

e.g. Whatever fulsome cliche of brilliance you want to attach to Hoffman is merited.

101

meritorious

deserving of honor or esteem

e.g. worked all night with meritorious determination to get the project done on time

102

mesa

an isolated relatively flat-topped natural elevation usually more extensive than a butte and less extensive than a plateau
a broad terrace with an abrupt slope on one side; bench

103

mesh

enmesh, entangle
to cause (as gears) to engage; to coordinate closely; interlock
also

e.g. They meshed traditions from several cultures into one wedding ceremony.
a book trying to mesh philosophy and humor
We covered the blueberry bushes in nylon mesh to keep the birds from the fruit.
a routine request that got hung up in the meshes of the state bureaucracy

104

metaphysics

the part of philosophy that is concerned with the basic causes and nature of things

105

mete

(archaic) measure
to give out by measure; dole (oft. used with out)
boundary

e.g. mete out punishment
metes and bounds

106

meteoric

of or relating to a meteor
resembling a meteor in speed or in sudden and temporary brilliance
of, relating to, or derived from the earth's atmosphere

e.g. a meteoric rise to fame
meteoric water

107

methodical

arranged, characterized by, or performed with method or order
habitually proceeding according method; systematic

e.g. Their methodical review of the evidence exposed some problems with the study's findings.
She's a slow and methodical worker, and her drawings reflect the extra care she takes.

108

metrical

of, relating to, or arranged in a rhythmic pattern of beats

e.g. The metrical chugging of the machinery had a hypnotic effect.

109

metropolis

a very large or important city

e.g. a big, teeming metropolis where ambitious people from all over come to make their mark