Word List 11 Flashcards Preview

GRE Vocabulary > Word List 11 > Flashcards

Flashcards in Word List 11 Deck (87):
1

denture

a set of teeth
an artificial replacement for one or more teeth; especially a set of false teeth

2

denude

to deprive of something important
to strip of all covering or surface layers
to lay bare by erosion

e.g. Excessive logging has denuded the hillside of the trees.

3

pictograph

an ancient or prehistoric drawing or painting on a rock wall
one of the symbols belonging to a pictorial graphic system
a diagram representing statistical data by pictorial forms

4

deplore

to feel or express grief for; to regret strongly
to consider unfortunate or deserving of deprecation

e.g. We deplore the development of nuclear weapons.
Although deplored by many, her decisions have greatly benefited the company.

5

depose

to remove from a throne or other high position
to put down; deposit
to testify to under oath or by affidavit; affirm, assert; to take a deposition of

e.g. A military junta deposed the dictator after he had bankrupted the country.
She was nervous when the time to depose before the jury finally arrived.

6

deposition

- depose

e.g. She gave a videotaped deposition about what she saw that night.
His attorneys took depositions from the witnesses.
the deposition of sand and gravel on the river bed

7

depraved

marked by corruption or evil; especially perverted

e.g. He acted with depraved indifference to human suffering.

8

depravity

- depraved

e.g. He was sinking into a life of utter depravity.
People were shocked by the depravity of her actions.

9

deprecate

to seek to avert
to express disapproval of
play down; make little of; belittle, disparage

e.g. Movie critics tried to outdo one another in deprecating the comedy as the stupidest movie of the year.

10

deprivation

the state of being deprived; privation, especially removal from an office, dignity, or benefice
an act or instance of depriving

e.g. She eventually overcame the deprivations of her childhood.

11

deputy

a person appointed as a substitute with power to act
a second in command or assistant who usually takes charge when his or her superior is absent
a member of the lower house of some legislative assemblies

e.g. The club president sent a deputy to the conference to vote on our behalf.
a deputy supervisor

12

deracinate

uproot
to remove or separate from a native environment or culture; especially to remove the racial or ethnic characteristics or influences from

13

derelict

abandoned especially by the owner or occupant; also run-down
lacking a sense of duty; negligent
also - derelict
a destitute homeless social misfit; vagrant, bum

e.g. The officer was charged with being derelict in his duty.
It was a run-down neighborhood filled with drug addicts and derelicts.

14

dereliction

an intentional abandonment; the state of being abandoned
intentional or conscious neglect; delinquency
fault, shortcoming

e.g. the dereliction of a cause by its leaders
a seriously dereliction of duty

15

deride

to laugh at contemptuously
to subject to usually bitter or contemptuous ridicule

e.g. My brothers derided our effort, but were forced to eat their words when we won first place.

16

derivation

the formation of a word from another word or base; the act of ascertaining or stating the derivation of a word; etymology
source, origin; descent, origination
an act or process of deriving

e.g. He is doing research into the derivation of "Yankee."
Scientists are debating the possible derivation of birds from dinosaurs.

17

derivative

- derivation
also

e.g. Petroleum is a derivative of coal tar.
A number of critics found the film derivative and predictable.
His style seems too derivative of Hemingway.

18

derogate

to cause to seem inferior; disparage
to take away a part so as to impair; detract
to act beneath one's position or character

e.g. The title of the book derogates the people it is about.
Her parents are constantly derogating her achievements.

19

rogation

litany, supplication, prayer

20

descent

attack, invasion
a sudden disconcerting appearance (as for a visit)

21

descry

to catch sight of
find out, discover

e.g. We couldn't descry the reasons for his sudden departure.
I descried a sail.

22

desecrate

to violate the sanctity of; profane
to treat disrespectfully, irrelevantly, or outrageously

e.g. the kind of shore development that has desecrated so many waterfronts
Vandals desecrated the cemetery last night by covering the tombstones with graffiti.

23

consecrate

dedicated to a sacred purpose
to induct (a person) into a permanent office with a religious rite
to make or declare sacred; to effect the liturgical transubstantiation of (eucharistic bread and wine)
to devote to a purpose with or as if with deep solemnity or dedication
to make inviolable or venerable

e.g. the consecrate gold tablets
a philanthropist who consecrated his considerable fortune to an array of charitable causes
principles consecrated by weight of history

24

desiccate

to dry up; to preserve a food by drying, dehydrate
to drain of emotionally or intellectual vitality

e.g. That historian's dry-as-dust prose desiccates what is actually an exciting period in European history.

25

designation

the act of indicating or identifying
the appointment to or selection for an office, post, or service
a distinguishing name, sign, or title

e.g. Though many call her a liberal, it is not a designation she uses herself.
We've never given the homemade gadget a proper designation.

26

sublime

to elevate or exalt especially in dignity or honor; to render finer (as in purity or excellence)
to convert (something inferior) into something of higher worth
lofty, grand, or exalted in thought, expression, or manner
complete, utter

e.g. He composed some of the most sublime symphonies in existence.
sublime ignorance/beauty

27

despot

a ruler with absolute power and authority
a person exercising power tyrannically

e.g. He was a successful basketball coach, but many people regarded him as a petty despot.

28

destitution

the state of being destitute; especially such extreme want as threatens life unless relieved

e.g. widespread destitution in Third World countries

29

desultory

marked by lack of definite plan, regularity, or purpose
not connected with the main subject
disappointing in progress, performance, or quality

e.g. a desultory search for something of interest on TV
a desultory wine

30

detain

to hold or keep in or as if in custody
to retrain especially from proceeding

e.g. Unexpected business had detained her.

31

deter

to turn aside, discourage, or prevent from acting
inhibit

e.g. Some potential buyers will be deterred by the price.
Painting the metal will deter rust.

32

detergent

cleansing

33

detest

to feel intense and often violent antipathy toward; loathe

34

detraction

a lessening of reputation or esteem especially by envious, malicious, or petty criticism; belittling, disparagement
a taking away

e.g. Her inevitable detraction of every new idea is annoying to the other club members.
no detraction from its dignity or prestige

35

detritus

loose material (as rock fragments or organic particles) that results directly from disintegration; debris
miscellaneous remnants; odds and ends

e.g. the detritus of ancient civilizations
sifting through the detritus of his childhood

36

deviant

deviating especially from an accepted form

e.g. Some studies show that many violent criminals begin exhibiting deviant behavior in early childhood.

37

obviate

to anticipate and prevent (as a situation) or make unnecessary (as an action)

e.g. The new medical treatment obviates the need for surgery and many of the risks associated with surgery.

38

devious

wandering, roundabout; moving without a fixed course, errant
out-of-the-way, remote
deviating from a right, accepted, or common course
not straightforward, cunning; also deceptive

e.g. a devious path/ devious breezes
devious conduct/ a devious politician

39

devise

to form in the mind by new combinations or applications of ideas or principles; invent
to plan to obtain or bring about; plot
to give (real estate) by will

e.g. devise a new strategy/scheme
devise one's death

40

devoid

being without a usual, typical, or expected attribute or accompaniment (used with with)

e.g. an argument devoid of sense
a landscape devoid of life
a jug devoid of juice

41

void

not occupied, vacant; not inhabited, deserted
containing nothing; of no legal force or effect
idle, leisure
being without something specific
vain, useless
also
also - clear; discharge, emit; nullify, annul

e.g. void space/ a void contract
a nature void of all malice
a repressed memory that left a huge void in her recollections of her adolescent years
Any unauthorized repairs will void the warranty.

42

devotee

an ardent follow, supporter, or enthusiast (as of a religion, art form, or sport)

e.g. The nightclub is popular among jazz devotees.

43

devotional

relating to or used in religious services

44

devout

devoted to religion or to religious duties or exercises
expressing devotion or piety
devoted to a pursuit, belief, or mode of behavior; serious, earnest
warmly sincere

e.g. a devout attitude
a devout basketball fan
a devout wish for peace

45

seraphic

of, relating to, or suggestive of an angel

e.g. She endeavored to assume a seraphic expression, and partially succeeded.

46

diaphanous

characterized by such fineness of texture as to permit seeing through
characterized by extreme delicacy of form; ethereal
insubstantial, vague

e.g. diaphanous veil
diaphanous landscapes
a diaphanous hope of success

47

diatribe

a bitter and abusive speech or piece of writing
ironic or satirical criticism

e.g. a bitter diatribe against mainstream media

48

tribunal

a court or forum of justice
something that decides or determines

e.g. An international tribunal was formed to deal with war crimes.
the tribunal of public opinions

49

encomium

glowing and warmly enthusiastic praise; also an expression of this

e.g. the encomiums bestowed on a teacher at her retirement ceremonies

50

dictate

to give dictation
to speak or act domineeringly; prescribe
to issue as an order; to impose, pronounce, or specify authoritatively
to require or determine necessary

e.g. She's dictating a letter to her secretary.
They insisted on being able to dictate the terms of surrender.
Injuries dictated the choice of players.

51

didactic

designed or intended to teach
intended to convey instruction and information as well as pleasure and entertainment
making moral observations

e.g. The poet's works became increasingly didactic after his religious conversion.

52

die-hard

strongly or fanatically determined or devoted; especially strongly resisting change

e.g. die-hard fans
a die-hard conservative

53

diffident

hesitant in acting or speaking through lack of self-confidence
reserved, unassertive

e.g. For someone who makes a living performing for other people, the actress is remarkably diffident in real life.

54

diffuse

being at once verbose and ill-organized
not concentrated or localized

e.g. a diffuse speech that took a great deal of time to make a very small point
diffuse lighting

55

indignant

feeling or showing anger because of something unjust or unworthy; filled with or marked by indignation

e.g. He was very indignant about the changes.

56

dilapidate

to bring into a condition of decay or partial ruin

57

dilapidated

- dilapidate

e.g. a dilapidated old house

58

lapidary

a cutter, polisher, or engraver of precious stones usually other than diamonds
the art of cutting gems
having the elegance and precision associated with inscriptions on monumental stone
sculptured in or engraved on stone
of, relating to, or suggestive of precious stones or the art of cutting them

e.g. a stanza that has a lapidary dignity

59

alacrity

promptness in response; cheerful readiness

e.g. accepted the invitation with alacrity

60

dilettante

an admirer or lover of the arts
a person having a superficial interest in an art of a branch of knowledge; dabbler

61

diminution

the act, process, or an instance of diminishing; decrease

e.g. a diminution of 60 percent over the course of the month

62

dingy

dirty, unclean
shabby, squalid

63

diplomatic

exactly reproducing the original
of, relating to, or concerned with diplomacy or diplomats
employing tact and conciliation especially in situations of stress

e.g. a diplomatic edition
diplomatic relations
a diplomatic attempt at preventing any hurt feelings

64

dirge

a song or hymn of grief of lamentation; especially one intended to accompany funeral or memorial rites
a slow, solemn, and mournful piece of music
something (as a poem) that has the qualities of a dirge

65

disabuse

to free from error, fallacy or misconception

e.g. disabuse him of his foolish notions about married life

66

disaffect

to alienate the affection or loyalty of; also to fill with discontent and unrest

e.g. A disaffected boyfriend was responsible for the vandalism to her home.
The troops were disaffected by the extension of their tours of duty.

67

disarray

a lack of order or sequence; confusion, disorder
disorderly mess; dishabille

e.g. The company has fallen into complete disarray.

68

disbar

to expel from the bar or the legal profession; deprive (an attorney) of legal status and privileges

69

disburse

to pay out; expend especially from a fund
to make a payment in settlement of
distribute

e.g. The money will be disbursed on the basis of need.
disburse a bill

70

discern

to detect with the eyes (or with senses other than vision)
to recognize or identify as separate and distinct; discriminate
to come to know or recognize mentally

e.g. discerned a figure approaching through the fog
discern right from wrong
unable to discern his motives

71

disciple

one who accepts and assists in spreading the doctrines of another

e.g. a circle of dedicated disciples who conscientiously wrote down everything the prophet said

72

disclaim

to make a disclaimer
to utter denial
to renounce a legal claim to
deny, disavow

e.g. disclaimed any knowledge of the contents of the letter
Her spokesperson flatly disclaimed the marriage rumor circulating in the press.

73

discombobulate

upset, confuse

e.g. inventing cool new ways to discombobulate the old order

74

discomfit

to frustrate the plans of; thwart
to put into a state of perplexity and embarrassment; disconcert

e.g. Constant interruptions discomfited her in her attempt to finish the speech, and she finally gave up.
He was discomfited by the awkward situation of having his ex-girlfriend meet his current one.

75

discomfiture

- discomfit

e.g. blushed and lowered her eyes in evident discomfiture

76

discompose

to destroy the composure of
to disturb the order of

e.g. discomposed by the tone of the message left on his answering machine
The wind ruffled her hair and discomposed her carefully arranged papers.

77

discourse

verbal interchange of ideas; especially conversation
a formal and orderly and usually extended expression of thought on a subject
to express oneself especially in oral discourse
talk, converse

e.g. She delivered an entertaining discourse on the current state of film industry.
The guest lecturer discourses at some length on the long-term results of the war.

78

discrete

constituting a separate entity; individually distinct
consisting of distinct or unconnected elements; noncontinuous
taking on or having a finite or countably infinite number of values

e.g. several discrete sections
discrete probabilities

79

discretionary

left to discretion; exercised at one's own discretion
available for discretionary use

e.g. discretionary purchasing power

80

preordain

to decree or ordain in advance

e.g. My wide and I are such soulmates, I'm convinced that our marriage was preordained.

81

discriminatory

making distinctions; discriminative
applying or favoring discrimination in treatment

e.g. The law prohibits discriminatory hiring practices.

82

discursive

moving from topic to topic without order; rambling
proceeding coherently from topic to topic
marked by analytical reasoning
of or relating to discourse

e.g. The speaker's discursive style made it difficult to understand his point.
discursive practices

83

incriminate

to charge with or show evidence or proof of involvement in a crime or fault

e.g. In exchange for a reduced sentence, the thief agreed to incriminate his accomplice.

84

disdain

a feeling of contempt for someone or something regarded as unworthy or inferior; scorn
to look on with scorn
to refuse or abstain from because of a feeling of contempt or scorn
to treat as beneath one's notice or dignity

e.g. I have a healthy disdain for companies that mistreat their worker.
disdained him as a coward
She disdained to answer that question.

85

disembody

to divest of a body, of corporeal existence, or of reality

86

disembodied

free from bodily existence; incorporeal

87

disenchant

free from illusion

e.g. If you thought that you could pass this course without doing any work, let me be the first to disenchant you.