Word List 20 Flashcards Preview

GRE Vocabulary > Word List 20 > Flashcards

Flashcards in Word List 20 Deck (100):
1

incontrovertible

not open to question; indisputable

e.g. incontrovertible facts that left the jury with no choice but to convict

2

incorrigible

incapable of being corrected or amended

e.g. an incorrigible habit of playing practical jokes

3

incorruptible

not subject to decay or dissolution
incapable of being bribed or morally corrupted

4

venal

capable of being bought or obtained for money or other valuable consideration; purchasable; especially, open to corrupt influence and especially bribery; mercenary
originating in, characterized by, or associated with corrupt bribery

e.g. That judge is known for being venal and easily bought.
a venal arrangement with the police

5

incredulous

unwilling to admit or accept what is offered as true; not credulous; skeptical
too extraordinary and improbable to be believed; incredible
expressing incredulity

e.g. She listened to his explanation with an incredulous smile.

6

incriminate

to charge with or show evidence or proof of involvement in a crime or fault

e.g. In exchange for a reduced sentence, the thief agreed to incriminate his accomplice.

7

incubation

the period between the infection of an individual by a pathogen and the manifestation of the illness or disease it causes; incubation period

8

incubus

an evil spirit that lies on persons in their sleep
a frightening dream that usually awakens the sleeper; nightmare
one that oppresses or burdens like a nightmare

9

inculcate

to teach and impress by frequent repetitions or admonitions

e.g. The teacher inculcated in her students the importance of good study habits.

10

incumbent

the holder of an office or ecclesiastical benefice
one that occupies a particular position or place
imposed as duty; obligatory
having the status of an incumbent
lying or resting on something else

e.g. Voters will have the chance to see the incumbent and her opponent in a series of three debates.
It is incumbent upon you to attend every staff meeting.
the team's incumbent third baseman

11

recumbent

suggestive of repose; leaning, resting
representing a person lying down

e.g. The Egyptian sphinx has the body of a recumbent lion.

12

incur

to become liable or subject to; bring down upon oneself

e.g. incur expenses
What did he do to incur such wrath?

13

indebted

owing gratitude or recognition to another; beholden
owing money

e.g. thereafter forever felt indebted to the producer for giving her her lucky break

14

indefatigable

incapable of being fatigued; untiring

e.g. a person of indefatigable patience
an indefatigable laborer who can work from sunrise to sunset

15

indelible

that cannot be removed, washed away, or erased
making marks that cannot easily be removed
lasting; unforgettable, memorable

e.g. Winning the state basketball championship was our team's most indelible experience.
an indelible pencil

16

indemnify

to secure against hurt, loss, or damage
to make compensation to for incurred hurt, loss, or damage

e.g. The company generously indemnifies workers who are injured on the job.

17

indemnity

security against hurt, loss, or damage; exemption from incurred penalties or liabilities

e.g. an agreement providing indemnity against prosecution
pay $2 million in indemnities

18

indent

to notch the edge of; make jagged
to bind (as an apprentice) by or as if by indentures
to force inward so as to form a depression

19

indenture

a contract binding one person to work for another for a given period of time
indentation

20

indict

to charge with a fault or offense; criticize, accuse
to charge with a crime by the finding or presentment of a jury in due form of law

e.g. A grand jury could indict the mayor for fraud and embezzlement.

21

indigence

a level of poverty in which real hardship and deprivation are suffered and comforts of life are wholly lacking

e.g. There are various state and federal programs to help relieve indigence.

22

indigenous

produced, growing, living, or occurring naturally in a particular region or environment
innate, inborn

e.g. indigenous plants/culture

23

indigent

suffering from extreme poverty; impoverished

e.g. The clinic provides free care for indigent patients.

24

indignant

feeling or showing anger because of something unjust or unworthy; filled with or marked with indignation

e.g. became indignant at the accusations

25

indignity

an act that offends against a person'e dignity or self-respect; insult
humiliating treatment

e.g. He remembers all the indignities he had suffer in the early years of his career.

26

indispensable

not subject to being set aside or neglected

e.g. Full aware that he was an indispensable assistant, he decided that it was high time that he be paid what he was worth.

27

indoctrinate

to instruct especially in fundamentals or rudiment; teach
to imbue with a usually partisan or sectarian opinion, point of view, or principle

e.g. The goal should be to teach politics, rather than to indoctrinate students in a narrow set of political beliefs.

28

indolent

causing little or no pain; slow to develop or heal
averse to activity, effort, or movement; habitually lazy
conducive to or encouraging laziness
showing an inclination to laziness

e.g. indolent tumors/ulcers
an indolent boy who had to be forced to help out with the chores
indolent heat
an indolent sigh

29

indubitable

too evident to be doubted; unquestionable

e.g. the indubitable fact that there are no more woolly mammoths or saber-toothed tigers around

30

induct

to put in formal possession; install
to admit as a member; introduce, initiate
lead, conduct

e.g. inducted as president of the college
inducted into a scholastic society

31

indurate

physically or morally hardened
to make unfeeling, stubborn, or obdurate
to make hard or hardy; inure
to establish firmly; confirm

e.g. an indurate heart that admits no love or mercy
clay that had been indurated by long exposure to the summer sun
Such a brutal upbringing could only callous his soul and indurate his heart to the suffering of others.

32

industrious

constantly, regularly, or habitually active or occupied; diligent

33

ineffable

incapable of being expressed in words; indescribable
not to be uttered; taboo

e.g. an ineffable beauty descends upon the canyon as the sun begins to set
the ineffable name of Jehovah

34

ineffectual

not producing the proper or intended effect; futile
not capable of performing efficiently or as expected; ineffective

e.g. An ineffectual effort to find the trail again did at least lead them to another stunning view of the canyon.

35

ineluctable

not to be avoided, changed, or resisted; inevitable

e.g. The ineluctable approach of winter had many worried about the cost of heating their homes.

36

inept

lacking in fitness or aptitude; unfit
lacking sense or reason; foolish
not suitable to the time, place, or occasion; inappropriate often to an absurd degree

e.g. inept at sports
an inept metaphor
He made an inept attempt to apologize.

37

inequity

injustice, unfairness; also, an instance of such

e.g. the inequities in wages paid to men and women
The inequity of the punishment led many people to believe that the defendant was being punished for his political beliefs.

38

inexorable

not to be persuaded, moved, or stopped; relentless

e.g. the inexorable rise of a political movement

39

inexplicable

incapable of being explained, interpreted, or accounted for

e.g. an inexplicable desire for ice cream at two in the morning

40

infantry

soldiers trained, armed, and equipped to fight on foot
a branch of an army composed of these soldiers
an infantry regiment or division

41

infatuate

to cause to be foolish; deprive of sound judgment
to inspire with a foolish or extravagant love or admiration

42

odium

the state or fact or being subjected to hatred and contempt as a result of a despicable act or blameworthy circumstance
hatred and condemnation accompanied by loathing or contempt; detestation
disrepute or infamy attached to something; opprobrium

e.g. Time did nothing to diminish the odium in which the traitor lived out his days.

43

infelicitous

not appropriate or well-timed
awkward, unfortunate

e.g. an infelicitous comment on the weight of the guest of honor at the banquet

44

infest

to spread or swarm in or over in a troublesome manner
to live in or on as a parasite

e.g. a slum infested with crime
shark-infested water
In desperation, we called in an exterminator because the house was infested with ants.

45

festinate

hasty

e.g. a most festinate preparation

46

infirm

of poor or deteriorated vitality; especially, feeble from age
weak of mind, will, or character; irresolute, vacillating
not solid or stable; insecure

e.g. The clinic provides free care for elderly and infirm people who lack health insurance.

47

inflame

to excite to excessive or uncontrollable action or feeling; especially, to make angry
to make more heated or violent; intensify
to set on fire; kindle
to cause to redden or grow hot from anger or excitement

e.g. His angry speech inflamed the mob.
ideas that inflame imagination
a face inflamed with passion

48

conflate

to bring together; fuse
confuse
to combine (as two readings or a text) into a composite whole

e.g. Be careful not to conflate gossip with real news.
The movie conflates documentary footage and dramatized reenactments so seamlessly and ingeniously that viewers may not know what is real and what is not.

49

informed

having information
based on possession of information
educated, knowledgeable

e.g. Informed sources told us of the new policy.
an informed opinion/choice
what the informed person should know

50

infraction

the act of infringing; violation

e.g. Speeding is only a minor infraction, but vehicular homicide is a serious felony.

51

refractory

resisting control or authority; stubborn, unmanageable
resistant to treatment or care; unresponsive to stimulus
immune, insusceptible
difficult to fuse, corrode, or draw out; especially, capable of enduring high temperature

e.g. Believing that rules are only for other people, he's been refractory virtually his entire life.
refractory to infection

52

infringe

to encroach upon in a way that violets law or the rights of another

e.g. infringe a patent

53

infuse

to cause to be permeated with something
inspire, animate

e.g. infuse the team with confidence
the sense of purpose that infuses scientific research

54

ingenious

having or showing an unusual aptitude for discovering, inventing, or contriving
marked by originality, resourcefulness, and cleverness in conception or execution

e.g. an ingenious plot/detective/contraption

55

ingenue

a naive girl or young woman
the stage role of an ingenue; also, an actress playing such a role

56

ingenuity

- ingenious

e.g. She showed amazing ingenuity in finding ways to cut costs.
It will take considerable ingenuity to fix these problems.

57

ingenuous

showing innocent or childlike simplicity and candidness
lacking craft or subtlety

e.g. her ingenuous thirst for experience

58

ingrained

worked into the grain or fiber
forming a part of the essence or inmost being; deep-seated

e.g. ingrained distrust of all authority

59

ingratiate

to gain favor or favorable acceptance for by deliberate effort (usually used with with)

e.g. ingratiate themselves with the community leaders

60

ingratiating

capable of winning favor; pleasing
intended or adopted in order to gain favor; flattering

e.g. an ingratiating smile

61

inimical

being adverse often by reason of hostility or malevolence
having the disposition of an enemy; hostile
reflecting or indicating hostility; unfriendly

e.g. forces inimical to democracy
inimical factions
his father's inimical glare

62

inimitable

not capable of being imitated; matchless

e.g. an inimitable performer of violin solos
inimitable style

63

iniquitous

very unfair or evil

e.g. zero tolerance at the academy for cheating and other iniquitous practices

64

iniquity

gross injustice; wickedness
a wicked act or thing; sin

e.g. The use of illegal narcotics is not only a destroyer or personal health but also an iniquity that undermines our society.
a nation still struggling with the aftereffects of the iniquity of slavery

65

rectitude

the quality or state of being straight
moral integrity; righteousness
the quality or state of being correct in judgment or procedure

e.g. encouraged the graduates to go on to live lives of unimpeachable rectitude and integrity
a finely honed sense of rectitude that keeps him from cheating on exams

66

injunction

the act or an instance of enjoining; order, admonition
a writ granted by a court of equity whereby one is required to do or to refrain from doing a specified act

e.g. In the cult there were injunctions for and against everything, as nothing was a matter of personal choice.

67

enjoin

to direct or impose by authoritative order or with urgent admonition
forbid, prohibit

e.g. enjoined us to be careful
He was enjoined by his conscience from telling a lie.

68

injurious

inflicting or tending to inflict injury; detrimental
abusive, defamatory

e.g. an injurious effect

69

inkling

a slight indication or suggestion; hint, clue
a slight knowledge or vague notion

e.g. He did not give the slightest inkling that he was planning to quit.
She had not the faintest inkling of what it was all about.

70

natality

the ratio between births and individuals in a specified population and time; birthrate

71

innocuous

producing no injury; harmless
not likely to give offense or to arouse strong feelings or hostility; inoffensive, insipid

e.g. a few innocuous jokes
those innocuous lies we must tell every day if society is to remain civil

72

innuendo

an oblique allusion; hint, insinuation; especially, a veiled or equivocal reflection on character or reputation
the use of such allusions

e.g. His reputation has been damaged by innuendos about his drinking and gambling.
The movie relies on sexual innuendo for its humor.

73

endogenous

caused by factors inside the organism or system
produced or synthesized within the organism or system

e.g. suffered from endogenous depression
endogenous business cycles
an endogenous hormone

74

inoculate

to introduce a microorganism into
to introduce immunologically active material into
to introduce something into the mind of

e.g. inoculated the with the idea that the individual can always make a difference in this world

75

inordinate

exceeding reasonable limits; immoderate

e.g. an inordinate amount of time

76

inquisitive

given to examination or investigation
inclined to ask questions; especially, inordinately or improperly curious about the affairs of others

e.g. an inquisitive woman who tends to everybody's business but her own

77

inquisition

the act of inquiring; examination
an investigation conducted with little regard to individual rights

e.g. His political enemies were conducting an inquisition into the details of his personal life.

78

inroad

a sudden hostile incursion; raid
an advance or penetration often at the expense of someone or something (oft. pl.)

e.g. The army is finally making inroads into enemy territory.

79

inscribe

to write, engrave, or print as a lasting record
to enter on a list; enroll
to dedicate to someone
to draw within a figure so as to touch in as many places as possible

e.g. inscribe the monument with the soldier's names
a regular polygon inscribed in a circle

80

inscrutable

not readily investigated, interpreted, or understood; mysterious

e.g. an inscrutable smile
inscrutable motives

81

insensate

lacking sense or understanding; also, foolish
lacking animate awareness or sensation
lacking humane feeling; brutal

e.g. the belief that God is immanent in all things, even insensate objects
an insensate boss who refuses to allow time off for funerals

82

insentient

lacking perception, consciousness, or animation

e.g. the belief that the universe as we know it evolved from the random interactions of insentient particles
an insentient therapist who failed to see what the teenager's real problem was

83

insidious

awaiting a chance to entrap; treacherous
harmful but enticing; seductive
having a gradual and cumulative effect; subtle

e.g. the insidious pressures of modern life

84

insignia

a badge of authority or honor
a distinguishing mark or sign

e.g. jackets with school's insignia on the front

85

insinuate

to introduce (as an idea) gradually or in a subtle, indirect, or covert way
to impart or suggest in an artful or indirect way; imply

e.g. Years were needed for an agent to insinuate himself into the terrorist organization
Are you insinuating that I won by cheating?

86

insipid

lacking taste or savor; tasteless
lacking in qualities that interest, stimulate, or challenge; dull, flat

e.g. insipid soup
insipid prose

87

insolent

insultingly contemptuous in speech or conduct; overbearing
exhibiting boldness or effrontery; impudent

e.g. an appalling insolent reply to a reasonable request

88

insoluble

having or admitting of no solution or explanation

e.g. the seemingly insoluble mystery concerning the identity of the people who built these ancient structures

89

insolvency

the fact or state of being insolvent; inability to pay debts

e.g. Unless the economy improves, many resorts in the area face insolvency.

90

somniferous

causing or tending to cause sleep; soporific

e.g. a somniferous enumeration of details that I could have done without

91

somnolent

of a kind likely to induce sleep
inclined to or heavy with sleep; drowsy
sleepy

e.g. somnolent students on a very hot day
the somnolent hum of insects in the grass

92

forestall

to exclude, hinder, or prevent by prior occupation or measures
to get ahead of; anticipate

e.g. His comments were meant to forestall criticism of his proposal.

93

instate

to set or establish in a rank or office; install

e.g. The new secretary of the treasury was instated on Monday.

94

instigate

to goad or urge forward; provoke

e.g. The government has instigated an investigation into the cause of the accident.

95

instill

to cause to enter drop by drop
to impart gradually

e.g. instill medication into the infected eye
a charismatic who instilled in his followers a passionate commitment to the cause

96

institute

to establish in a position or office
to organize and get established; organize
to set going; inaugurate

e.g. They have instituted new policies to increase public safety.

97

restitution

a restoration of something to its rightful owner
a making good of or giving an equivalent for some injury
a legal action serving to cause restoration of a previous state

e.g. the restitution of her stolen property
make restitution to the victim

98

abrogate

to abolish by authoritative action; annul
to treat as nonexistent

e.g. The company's directors are accused of abrogating their responsibilities.
The Congress can abrogate old treaties that are unfair.

99

institutionalize

to make into an institution; give character of an institution to; especially, to incorporate into an structured and often highly formalized system
to put in the care of an institution

e.g. institutionalized housing
It will take time to institutionalize these reforms.
institutionalized alcoholics

100

instrumental

serving as a crucial means, agent, or tool

e.g. ... was instrumental in organizing the strike.