Word List 46 Flashcards Preview

GRE Vocabulary > Word List 46 > Flashcards

Flashcards in Word List 46 Deck (93):
1

pesky

troublesome, vexatious

e.g. the pesky problem of what to do with all the leftovers

2

petulant

insolent or rude in speech or behavior
characterized by temporary or capricious ill humor; peevish

e.g. a petulant and fussy man who is always blaming everyone else for his problems

3

pharisaic

marked by hypocritical censorious self-righteousness

4

phial

vial

5

philology

the study of literature and of disciplines relevant to literature or to language as used in literature
linguistics

6

phony

not genuine or real

e.g. phony publicity stories
a phony poetic elegance

7

piazza

(pl. piazze) an open square especially in an Italian town
an arcaded and roofed gallery

8

piebald

composed of incongruous parts
of different colors; especially, spotted or blotched with black and white

e.g. a model who owes his striking good looks to his markedly piebald ethnic background

9

piecemeal

one piece at a time; gradually
in pieces or fragment; apart
also

e.g. remodeled their house piecemeal because of budgetary constraints
One well-aimed blow ripped the pinata piecemeal.
piecemeal repairs major reconstruction

10

pilfer

steal; especially, to steal stealthily in small amounts and often again and again

e.g. She pilfered stamps and paper from work.

11

piscatorial

of, relating to, or dependent on fish or fishing

12

plank

a heavy thick board
an article in the platform of a political party
a principal item of a policy or program

e.g. Before the convention, there was debate over the foreign policy and economic planks.

13

plebeian

one of the common people
crude or coarse in manner or style; common

e.g. wondered what the people at the country club would think of his plebeian origins

14

plenary

complete in every aspects; absolute, unqualified
fulled attended or constituted by all entitled to be present

e.g. plenary power
a plenary meeting of all 500 members

15

pleonasm

redundancy

e.g. Ignorance of the true meaning of a word often leads to pleonasm.

16

poach

to encroach upon especially for the purpose of taking something
to trespass on

e.g. a field poached too frequently by the amateur
a staff poached from other companies

17

poltroon

a spiritless coward; craven
also

e.g. a military commander who was so poltroon that he surrendered without having fired so much as a single shot

18

polyandry

the state or practice of having more than one husband or male mate at one time

19

polyglot

a polyglot person
speaking or writing several language; multilingual
widely diverse

e.g. a polyglot population/sign/cuisine
a polyglot community made up of many cultures

20

polymath

a person of encyclopedic learning

21

portend

to give an omen or anticipatory sign of
indicate, signify

e.g. The distant thunder portended a storm.

22

potboiler

a usually inferior work (as of art or literature) produced chiefly for profit

23

prefigure

to show, suggest, or announce by an antecedent type, image, or likeness
to picture or imagine beforehand

e.g. His style of painting prefigured the development of modern art.
The first crocus traditionally prefigures the arrival of spring.

24

prehensile

adapted for seizing or grasping especially by wrapping around
gifted with mental grasp or moral or aesthetic perception

e.g. a prehensile tail

25

preponderant

having superior weight, force, or influence
having greater prevalence

e.g. In spite of the preponderant odds against him, the charge was almost a success.

26

prepossessing

tending to create a favorable impression; attractive

e.g. a confident and prepossessing young man

27

presentiment

a feeling that something will or is about to happen; premonition

e.g. a nagging presentiment of danger

28

prevision

foresight, prescience
forecast, prognostication
foresee

e.g. He claimed to have previsioned the crash of the stock market.

29

prickle

a fine sharp process or projection
a prickling or tingling sensation

e.g. a prickle of fear
He felt the familiar prickle of excitement as the game began.

30

prig

a person who displays or demands of others pointlessly precise conformity, fussiness about trivialities, or exaggerated propriety, especially in a self-righteous or irritating manner

31

prissy

overly prim and precise; finicky

32

procrustean

marked by arbitrary often ruthless disregard of individual differences or special circumstances

e.g. He had no right to tyrannize over others, and tie them down to his own procrustean bed.

33

progenitor

an ancestor in the direct line; forefather
precursor, originator

e.g. the progenitors of modern art

34

prognosticate

to foretell from signs or symptoms; predict
presage

e.g. using current trends to prognosticate what the future will be like

35

prorogue

defer, postpone
to suspend or end a legislative session

e.g. The sovereign had never dared to prorogue the parliament against their will.

36

proverbial

relating to a proverb
commonly spoken of; widely known

e.g. proverbial brevity/wisdom/sayings
his proverbial inability to get anywhere on time

37

puffery

exaggerated commendation especially for promotional purposes; hype

e.g. The newspaper's local stories are often thinly disguised puffery for area business.

38

pullulate

germinate, sprout
to breed or produce freely
swarm, teem

e.g. the country's pullulating population
a tough city neighborhood that has a reputation for pullulating with prostitutes and petty criminals
an island pullulated with tourists

39

pummel

pound, beat

40

purblind

partly blind
lacking in vision, insight, or understanding; obtuse

41

purport

meaning conveyed, professed, or implied; import; also, substance, gist

e.g. The letter was not read aloud, but all present were informed of its purport.

42

purportedly

allegedly

43

purse

to pucker
contract

44

putative

commonly accepted or supposed
assumed to exist or to have existed

e.g. The putative reason for her dismissal was poor job performance.

45

putrid

being in a state of putrefaction; rotten
foul
morally corrupt; totally objectionable

e.g. a putrid shade of green

46

pygmy

an unusually small person
an insignificant or unimpressive person

e.g. Regrettably, most of the candidates for the party's nomination that year were political pygmies.

47

quagmire

soft miry land that shakes or yields under the foot
a difficult, precarious, or entrapping position; predicament

e.g. a protracted custody dispute that became a judicial quagmire

48

quintessence

the essence of a thing in its purest and most concentrated form
the most typical example or representative

e.g. The Parthenon in Greece was considered the quintessence of the perfectly proportioned building.

49

quip

a clever usually taunting remark; gibe
quibble, equivocation
something strange, droll, curious, or eccentric; oddity
also

e.g. trade quips over a beer

50

racketeer

one who obtains money by an illegal enterprise usually involving intimidation

e.g. The racketeer threatened to have his thugs vandalize the shop if the shopkeeper didn't pay him a monthly bribe.

51

raillery

good-natured ridicule; banter
jest

e.g. Luke had to put up with a lot of raillery from his sister the first time he asked a girl for a date.

52

rapscallion

rascal, ne'er-do-well

e.g. The city's run-down waterfront was occupied mostly by disreputable places frequented by drunkards and rapscallions.

53

rasp

to abrade with a rasp
to grate upon; irritate
to utter in a raspy tone
also

e.g. The metal box rasped as they dragged it across.
the rasp of the engine

54

ratify

to approve and sanction formally; confirm

e.g. ratify the treaty

55

ravish

to seize and take away by violence
to overcome with emotion (as by joy or delight)
rape; also, plunder

e.g. travelers long ravished with wonder and awe by the immensity of the pyramid
pirates who abduct fair maidens and ravish them without mercy

56

rebarbative

repellent, irritating

57

recline

to cause or permit to incline backwards
to lean or incline backwards
repose, lie

e.g. reclining on the sofa, watching TV
reclining seats

58

reconnoiter

to make a reconnaissance (of)

e.g. An expedition reconnoitered the coast to find out the exact location of enemy forces.

59

reedy

abounding in or covered with reeds
slender, frail
having the tone quality of a reed instrument

60

regent

a person who governs a kingdom in the minority, absence, or disability of the sovereignty
a person who rules or reigns; governor

61

regiment

a military unit consisting usually of a number of battalions
to form into or assign to a regiment
to organize rigidly especially for the sake of regulation
to subject to order or conformity

e.g. regiment their diet
She criticized the way the school regiments its students by having strict rules.

62

rejoin

to join again
to say often sharply or critically in response especially as a reply to a reply

63

rejoinder

reply; specifically, an answer to a reply

e.g. The article was a stinging rejoinder to her critics.

64

remission

- remit

e.g. a temporary remission of symptoms
He was given remission for good behavior.

65

remit

to desist from (an activity)
to let (as attention or diligence) slacken; relax
to release from the guilt or penalty of
to cancel or refrain from inflicting
to send (money) to a person or place
abate

e.g. The governor remitted the remainder of her life sentence.
remit a tax

66

remittance

a sum of money sent, especially by mail, in payment for goods or services or as a gift; payment
the action of sending money in payment

e.g. She always mails in her remittance on time so she won't ever be charged a late fee.

67

remittent

(of a disease) marked by alternating periods of abatement and increase of symptoms

e.g. remittent fever

68

remonstrate

to present and urge reasons in opposition; expostulate
to say or plead in protest, reproof, or opposition

e.g. I politely remonstrated with him about littering.

69

remunerate

to pay an equivalent for
to pay an equivalent for a service, loss, or expense; recompense

e.g. promptly remunerated the repair company for fixing the dryer
The negligent landlord must remunerate those made homeless by the fire by finding new housing for them at his own expense.

70

renascent

rising again into being or vigor

71

renunciate

to give up; abandon

72

repository

a place where a large amount of something is stored; depository
a person to whom something is confided or entrusted

e.g. a repository for nuclear waste
He is the repository of many secrets.

73

rescript

an official or authoritative order, decree, edict, or announcement
an act or instance of rewriting

e.g. Even though there was never an official rescript ordering mass genocide, that was indeed the intent and effect of the government's policy.

74

retentive

having the power, property, or capacity of retaining; especially, retaining knowledge easily

e.g. soils retentive of moisture
a retentive memory

75

reticulation

network

e.g. The reticulation of alleys will always prove to be a trouble to the police and a security for the pickpockets.

76

retrench

cut down, reduce
to pare away; remove
economize

e.g. When the economy slowed, the company was forced to retrench.

77

revulsion

a strong pulling or drawing away; withdrawal
a sense of utter distaste or repugnance

e.g. She was struck with revulsion at the sight of the dead animal.
a growing revulsion to war

78

rhapsody

effusively rapturous or extravagant discourse
rapture, ecstasy
a musical composition of irregular form having an improvisatory character

e.g. The mayor launched into a long rhapsody about his plans for the city.
Listening to Mozart always left him in a rhapsody that lingered for the remainder of the evening.

79

riffle

to ruffle slightly; ripple
to flip cursorily; thumb
also

e.g. Web research is convenient but doesn't offer the tactile pleasures of riffling through heavy old books.

80

riffraff

disreputable persons
the lowest class; rabble
refuse; rubbish

e.g. Here all the riffraff that had been unable to establish itself in better quarters had found some sort of a haven.
The sight of piles and piles of riffraff at the town dump was a sobering reminder that we are indeed a society of consumers.

81

rigmarole

confused or meaningless talk
a complex and sometimes ritualistic procedure

e.g. We had to go through the rigmarole of installing, registering, and activating the software before we found out it wouldn't work.

82

roister

to engage in noisy revelry; carouse

e.g. dressed and ready for a roistering night in town

83

rollicking

boisterously carefree, joyful, or high-spirited

e.g. a rollicking adventure film

84

rote

mechanical or unthinking routine or repetition

e.g. learn by rote
a joyless routine order, rote, and commercial hustle

85

rotund

rounded
orotund, sonorous
chubby

e.g. The actor's distinct baritone and his clear and rotund elocution are especially effective in dramatic readings.

86

rout

a crowd of people; specifically, rabble
disturbance
to poke around; to search haphazardly
to come up with; uncover
a state of wild confusion or disorderly retreat
debacle
to defeat decisively or disastrously

e.g. scouts routing out new talents
the discomfiture of seeing their party routed at the polls

87

rove

to move aimlessly; roam

e.g. rove the woods

88

ruck

the usual run of persons or things; generality
an indistinguishable gathering; jumble
pucker, wrinkle

e.g. trying to rise above the ruck

89

rucksack

knapsack

e.g. hikers carrying their food and water in rucksacks

90

rustle

to make or cause a rustle
to act or move with energy or speed
to forage food
to steal (as livestock) especially from a farm or ranch
to obtain by one's own exertions (oft. used with up)
a quick succession or confusion of small sounds

e.g. trees rustling in the wind
able to rustle up $5,000 bail
a rustle of leaves behind him

91

rustler

one who steals cattle, horses, etc.

92

saccharine

of or relating to sugar
overly or sickishly sweet
ingratiatingly or affectedly agreeable or friendly
overly sentimental; mawkish

e.g. a saccharine love story

93

saliferous

containing or producing salt