Word List 24 Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Word List 24 Deck (105):
1

mettle

vigor and strength of spirit or temperament
quality of temperament or disposition
stamina

e.g. equipment that proved its mettle
gentlemen of brave mettle

2

nettle

a tall plant that has leaves with hair that sting
to strike or sting with or as if with nettles
to arouse to sharp but transitory annoyance or anger

e.g. The mayor's recent actions have nettled some members of the community.

3

mettlesome

full of mettle; spirited

e.g. The mettlesome opening dance number got the audience all jazzed up.
a mettlesome debate on the teaching of evolution in the schools

4

miff

annoy
a petty quarrel or fit of pique

e.g. She was slightly miffed at not being invited.

5

migratory

of, relating to, or characterized by migration
wandering, roving

e.g. Most of the apple crop is picked by migratory workers.

6

milk

to draw or coerce profit or advantage from illicitly or to an extreme degree; exploit

e.g. greedy landlords milking their tenants of all their money

7

mime

a form of entertainment in which a performer plays a character or tells a story without words by using body movements and facial expressions
an actor in mime

8

mimic

one that mimics
imitative; mock
to imitate closely; ape
to ridicule by imitation

e.g. a gifted mimic who can do a terrific imitation of anyone's voice
a mimic battle fought by kids playing around
a talent for mimicking famous actresses

9

minaret

a tall slender tower of a mosque having one or more balconies from which the summons to prayer is cried by the muezzin

10

minatory

having a menacing quality

e.g. The novel's protagonist is haunted by a minatory black specter.

11

minacious

menacing, threatening

12

mince

to cut or chop into very small pieces
to walk with short steps in a prim affected manner

13

minion

a servile dependent, follower, or underling
a subordinate or petty official

e.g. Most of the top appointments went to the new governor's personal minions and political cronies.

14

minnow

a very small fish that is often used as bait to catch larger fish

15

mint

a place where coins, medals, or token are made
a place where something is manufactured
a vast sum or amount

e.g. worth a mint

16

modicum

a small portion; a limited quantity

e.g. Only a modicum of skill is necessary to put the kit together.

17

minuet

a slow graceful dance in 3/4 time characterized by forward balancing, bowing, and toe pointing
music for or in the rhythm of a minuet

18

minuscule

very small

e.g. Public health officials have claimed that the chemical is harmless in such minuscule amounts.

19

minutia

a minute or minor detail

20

mirage

something that is seen and appears to be real but that is not actually there
something that you hope for or want but that is not possible or real

e.g. A peaceful solution proved to be a mirage.

21

mire

wet spongy earth; heavy often deep mud or slush
a troublesome or intractable situation
to cause to stick fast in or as if in mire
to hamper or hold back as if by mire; entangle

e.g. found themselves in a mire of debt
The case has been mired in probate court for years.

22

mirth

gladness or gaiety as shown by or accompanied with laughter

e.g. Her clumsy attempt to cut the cake was the cause of much mirth.

23

misanthrope

a person who hates or distrusts humankind

e.g. a former misanthrope who now professes a newly discovered love of mankind

24

mischievous

harmful, injurious
able or tending to cause annoyance, trouble, or minor injury
irresponsibly playful

e.g. mischievous gossip
punished for their mischievous tricks on the neighbors

25

miscreant

unbelieving, heretical
depraved, villainous
infidel, heretic
one who behaves criminally or viciously

e.g. He supports tough penalties against corporate miscreant.

26

miser

a mean grasping person; especially, one who is extremely stingy with money

e.g. The miser liked to sit and play with his money.

27

spendthrift

a person who spends improvidently or wastefully

e.g. The spendthrift managed to blow all of his inheritance in a single year.

28

miserly

marked by grasping meanness and penuriousness

e.g. He was given a miserly raise.
My brother, who is notoriously miserly, surprised us when he offered to pick up the tab.

29

misgiving

a feeling of doubt or suspicion especially concerning a future event

e.g. I felt some misgiving about his ability to do the job.

30

misnomer

the misnaming of a person in a legal instrument
a use of a wrong or inappropriate name

e.g. "International Airport" is something of a misnomer, since almost all the arriving and departing flights are local.

31

misshapen

badly shaped; deformed

32

mite

a small coin or sum of money
a very little; bit
a very small object or creature

33

mitigate

to cause to become less harsh or hostile; mollify
to make less severe or painful; alleviate
extenuate

e.g. Emergency funds are being provided to help mitigate the effects of the disaster.
medicines used to mitigate a patient's suffering.

34

mitten

a covering for the hand and wrist having a separate section for the thumb only

35

mnemonics

a technique of developing the memory

36

moat

a deep and wide trench around the rampart of a fortified place that is usually filled with water
a channel resembling a moat

37

mode

a prevailing fashion or style (as of dress or behavior)

38

modish

fashionable, stylish

e.g. He wore a modish gray suit and hat.
the strikingly modish gown

39

modulate

to tune to a key or pitch
to adjust to or keep in proper measure or proportion; temper

e.g. Because she doesn't modulate her voice, she sounds exactly the same when she's excited as when she's sad.

40

mogul

a great personage; magnate

41

molar

a tooth with a rounded or flattened surface adapted for grinding

42

molding

an object produced by molding
a decorative recessed or relieved surface
a decorative plane or curved strip used for ornamentation or finishing

e.g. The house has beautiful moldings around its doors and windows.

43

mollify

to soothe in temper or disposition; appease
to reduce the rigidity of; soften
to reduce in intensity; assuage, temper

e.g. He tried to mollify his critics with an apology.

44

discommode

to cause inconvenience to; trouble

e.g. The breakdown of her car did not discommode her seriously.

45

pique

a transient feeling of wounded vanity; resentment
to arouse anger or resentment in; irritate
to excite or arouse especially by a provocation, challenge, or rebuff
pride

e.g. After a moment of pique, the senator responded calmly to his accusers.
He slammed the door in a fit of pique.
Her seat companion piqued her by repeatedly poking her in the ribs.
sly remarks to pique their curiosity
He piques himself on his skill as a cook.

46

mollycoddle

a pampered or effeminate man or boy
to treat with an excessive or absurd degree of indulgence and attention

e.g. refused to mollycoddle his malingering son and sent him off to school

47

molt

to shed hair, feather, shell, horns, or an outer layer periodically

48

molten

fused or liquefied by heat; melted
having warmth or brilliance

e.g. molten lava

49

moment

importance in influence or effect

e.g. The issues were of little moment to the electorate.

50

momentous

important, consequential

e.g. a momentous occasion that will go down in history books

51

mongrel

an individual resulting from the interbreeding of diverse breeds or strains; especially, one of unknown ancestry
a cross between types of persons or things
also

e.g. Mongrels often suffer fewer health problems than purebreds.

52

monocle

an eyeglass for one eye

53

monolithic

of, relating to, or resembling a monolith; huge, massive
cast as a single piece
constituting a massive undifferentiated and often rigid whole

e.g. a monolithic concrete wall
a monolithic floor covering
a monolithic society

54

monomania

mental illness especially when limited in expression to one idea or area of though
excessive concentration on a single object or idea

e.g. His interest in the subject verges on monomania.

55

monotonous

uttered or sounded in one unvarying tone; marked by a sameness of pitch and intensity
tediously uniform or unvarying

e.g. The lecturer's monotonous delivery threatened to put us to sleep.

56

monsoon

a periodic wind especially in the Indian Ocean and southern Asia
rainfall that is associated with the monsoon

e.g. floods caused by summer monsoon

57

montage

the production or a rapid succession of images in a motion picture to illustrate an association of ideas
a literary musical, or artistic composite of juxtaposed more of less heterogeneous elements
a heterogeneous mixture; jumble

e.g. My memories of the childhood trip are a montage of the sights, smells, and sounds of India.

58

monumental

serving or resembling a monumental; massive; also, highly significant; outstanding
of or relating to a monument
very great

e.g. the monumental complexity of the issue
a monumental misunderstanding

59

moralistic

characterized by or expressive of a concern with morality
characterized by or expressive of a narrow moral attitude

e.g. While a moralistic speech won't convince kids not to try drugs, a story about people affected by drugs might.

60

moratorium

a legally authorized period of delay in the performance of a legal obligation or the payment of a debt
a waiting period set by an authority
a suspension of activity

e.g. The treaty calls for a nuclear testing moratorium.
The director of the blood bank called for a moratorium in donations until the surplus could be used up.

61

morbid

of, relating to, or characteristic of disease
affected with or induced by disease
productive of disease
abnormally susceptible to or characterized by gloomy or unwholesome feelings
grisly, gruesome

e.g. morbid anatomy / a morbid condition
a morbid fascination with death

62

mordant

biting and caustic in thought, manner, or style; incisive
burning, pungent

e.g. a writer famous for her mordant humor
a mordant review of the movie that compare it to having one's teeth pulled for two hours

63

mordacious

biting or given to biting
sharp or caustic in style, tone, etc.

e.g. Unable longer to endure his mordacious humor, she turned and left him alone on the balcony.

64

mores

the fixed morally binding customs of a particular group
moral attributes
habits, manners

e.g. Women have long expressed their sexuality - and the mores of the time - through their choice of undergarments.

65

moribund

being in the state of dying; approaching death
being in the state of inactivity or obsolescence

e.g. an actor who is trying to revive his moribund career

66

morose

having a sullen and gloomy disposition
marked by or expressive of gloom

e.g. He became morose and withdrawn and would not talk to anyone.

67

sanguine

having blood as the predominating bodily humor; also, marked by sturdiness, high color, and cheerfulness
confident, optimistic

e.g. a sanguine disposition
sanguine about the company's future

68

morsel

a small piece of food; bite
a small quantity; fragment
a tasty dish; something delectable and pleasing
a negligible person

e.g. The chef's cuisine is so good that diners will want to savor every morsel.
searching for any morsel of useful information

69

mortar

a sturdy vessel in which material is pounded or rubbed with a pestle
a muzzle-loading cannon having a tube short in relation to its caliber that is used to throw projectiles at high angles

70

mortification

a sense of humiliation and shame caused by something that wounds one's pride or self-respect
the subjection and denial of bodily passions and appetites by abstinence or self-inflicted pain or discomfort
necrosis, gangrene

e.g. the mortification of being dumped the night before the prom

71

mortify

to subject to severe and vexing embarrassment; shame
to subdue or deaden especially by abstinence or self-inflicted pain or discomfort

e.g. was mortified by her children's atrocious manners

72

mortuary

of or relating to the burial of the dead
of, relating to, or characteristic of death
a place in which dead bodies are kept until burial; especially, funeral home

e.g. the huge department store's mortuary atmosphere in its sad, last weeks of operation

73

mosque

a building used for public worship by Muslims

74

mote

a small particle; speck

e.g. a mote of dirt

75

motif

a usually recurring salient thematic element; especially, a dominant idea or central theme
a single or repeated design or color

e.g. The motif of mute figures standing in lonely isolation is a recurrent one in the artist's works.

76

motley

variegated in color
composed or diverse often incongruous elements

e.g. a motley coat
a motley crew of musicians

77

mottle

a colored spot
to mark with spots or blotches of different color or shades of color as if stained

e.g. canvases covered with streaks and mottles
old papers mottled by mold

78

mountainous

containing many mountains
resembling a mountain; huge

e.g. the seemingly mountainous obstacles he had to overcome while growing up

79

muffle

to wrap up so as to conceal or protect
to wrap or pad with something to dull the sound
keep down, suppress

e.g. muffle the noise
muffle her angle

80

mulish

unreasonably and inflexibly obstinate

e.g. She approached the job with mulish determination.
a mulish insistence on doing things his own way

81

mundane

of, relating to, or characteristic of the world
characterized by the practical, transitory, and ordinary; commonplace

e.g. mundane chores, like washing dishes
Prayer and meditation helped her put her mundane worries aside.
the mundane concerns of day-to-day life

82

municipality

a primarily urban political unit having corporate status and usually powers of self-government
the governing body of a municipality

e.g. a municipality with an excellent police department

83

munificent

very liberal in giving or bestowing; lavish
characterized by great liberality or generosity

e.g. a munificent host who has presided over many charitable events at his mansion

84

munition

armament, ammunition

85

mural

of, relating to, or resembling a wall
applied to and made integral with a wall or ceiling surface
a mural work of art

86

murky

characterized by thickness and heaviness of air; foggy, misty
darkly vague or obscure

e.g. a politician with a murky past
one of church's murky chapels

87

pellucid

admitting maximum passage of light without diffusion or distortion
reflecting light evenly from all surfaces
easy to understand

e.g. a pellucid stream
Her poetry has a pellucid simplicity that betrays none of the sweat that went into writing it.

88

muse

to become absorbed in thought

e.g. I could sell the house, she mused, but then where should I go?

89

musket

a heavy large-caliber muzzle-loading usually smoothbore shoulder firearm; broadly, a shoulder gun carried by infantry

90

muster

an act of assembling; an assembled group
to cause to gather; convene
to enroll formally (usually used with in or into)
to call forth; rouse

e.g. a muster of concerned citizens
They pushed the car with all the strength they could muster.
mustered into the army
a command to muster the troops

91

mutineer

a person who is involved in a mutiny

e.g. The mutineers were captured after they turned to piracy on the open seas.

92

mutter

to utter sounds or words indistinctly or with a low voice and with lips partly closed
to murmur complainingly or angrily; grumble

e.g. She angrily muttered something about her bad luck.
Some employees are muttering about the changes in the penison plan.

93

myopia

a condition of the eye that makes it difficult to see objects that are far away
a lack of foresight or discernment; a narrow view of something

94

myriad

ten thousand
a great number
also

e.g. a myriad of possibilities
myriad problems/topics/activity

95

nadir

the lowest point

e.g. The discussion really reached its nadir when people resorted to name-calling.

96

narcotic

a drug (such as cocaine, heroin, or marijuana) that affects the brain and that is usually dangerous and illegal
a drug that is given to people in small amounts to make them sleep or feel less pain
something that soothes, relieves, or lulls
also

e.g. An irradicable sense of self-righteousness seems to be the narcotic that inures these religious fanatics from any realization of the harm they have done.
The lecturer drones on in a narcotic monotone that eventually had the entire class struggling to stay awake.

97

narcosis

a state of stupor, unconsciousness, or arrested activity produced by the influence of narcotics or other chemical or physical agents

98

natal

native
of, relating to, or present at birth; especially, associated with one's birth

99

natty

trimly neat and tidy; smart

e.g. a soldier in his natty blue uniform
He's quite a natty dresser.

100

nautical

of, relating to, or associated with seamen, navigation, or ships

e.g. sextants and other antique nautical equipment

101

naysay

to say nay to; deny; reject; oppose

102

nebulous

of, relating to, or resembling a nebula; nebular
indistinct, vague

e.g. nebulous references to some major changes the future may hold

103

nefarious

flagrantly wicked or impious; evil

e.g. the chaste heroines and nefarious villains of old-time melodramas

104

negate

to deny the existence or truth of
to cause to be ineffective or invalid

e.g. The fact that she lied about her work experience negated the contract.

105

neolithic

(cap.) of or relating to the latest period of the Stone Age characterized by polished stone implements
belonging to an earlier stage and now outmoded

e.g. My old manual typewriter now seems positively neolithic.