Word List 16 Flashcards Preview

GRE Vocabulary > Word List 16 > Flashcards

Flashcards in Word List 16 Deck (111):
1

flatcar

a railroad freight car without permanent raised sides, ends, or covering

2

flatten

to knock down; also, to defeat decisively

e.g. The team got flattened in the first round of the play-offs.

3

flax

a plant that has blue flowers and that is grown for its fiber and its seed
the fiber of the flax plant

4

fledge

(of a young bird) to acquire the feathers necessary for flight or independent activity; also, to leave the nest after acquiring such feathers

5

molt

to shed hair, feathers, shell, horns, or an outer layer periodically

e.g. A crab molts its shell as it grows larger.
Snakes molt as they grow, shedding the old skin and growing a large new skin.

6

fledgling

a young bird just fledged
an immature or inexperienced person
one that is new

e.g. At hockey he's still a fledgling and needs to work on his basic skating skills.
a fledgling company

7

perennial

present at all seasons of the year
persistent, enduring
continuing without interruption; constant, perpetual
regularly repeated or renewed; recurrent

e.g. perennial favorites
the perennial quest for certainty
Flooding is a perennial problem for people living by the river.

8

inflect

to turn from a direct line or course; curve
to vary (a word) by inflection; decline, conjugate
to affect or alter noticeably; influence

e.g. Most adjectives in English do not inflect for gender or number.
an approach inflected by feminism

9

flint

a massive hard dark quartz that produces a spark when struck by steel

e.g. the flint in a cigarette lighter

10

flip

not serious; flippant, impertinent

e.g. made some flip comments about the marriage between the old man and the considerably younger woman

11

flit

to pass quickly or abruptly from one place or condition to another
to move in an erratic fluttering manner

e.g. butterflies flitting around the garden
She was always flitting around the kitchen.

12

floodgate

a gate for shutting out, admitting, or releasing a body of water; sluice
something serving to restrain an outburst

e.g. opened the floodgates of criticism

13

florid

very flowery in style; ornate
tinged with red; ruddy
marked by emotional or sexual fervor
fully developed; manifesting a complete and typical clinical syndrome

e.g. gave a florid speech in honor of queen's visit
a florid complexion
a florid secret life / a florid sensibility
the florid stage of a disease

14

flounder

flatfish
to struggle to move or obtain footing; thrash about wildly
to proceed or act clumsily or ineffectually

e.g. He was floundering around in the pool like an amateur.

15

flout

to treat with contemptuous disregard; scorn

e.g. Despite repeated warnings, they have continued to flout the law.

16

fluffy

covered with or resembling fluff
being light and soft or airy; puffed up
lacking in meaning or substance; superficial

e.g. a fluffy omelet

17

fluke

an accidentally successful stroke at billiards or pool
a stroke of luck

e.g. The discovery was a fluke.

18

fluster

to make tipsy
to put into a state of agitated confusion; upset
also

e.g. The interruption flustered the speaker.
Some speakers fluster more easily than others.
There was a palpable fluster in the audience when I asked my awkward question.

19

flutter

to flap wings rapidly
to move with quick wavering or flapping motions; to vibrate in irregular spasms
to move about or behave in an agitated aimless manner
also

e.g. butterflies fluttering in the garden
The flutter of the flame cast shadows on the ceiling.
He was in a flutter until he found his keys.

20

fluvial

of, relating to, or living in a stream or river
produced by the action of a stream

e.g. a fluvial plain

21

flux

a continued flow
change, fluctuation

e.g. January typically brings a great flux of returns to department stores.
in a state of flux

22

foible

a minor flaw or shortcoming in character or behavior; weakness

e.g. admired their teacher despite his foibles

23

foil

to prevent from attaining an end; defeat
to bring to naught; thwart
someone or something that serves as a contrast to another
a light fencing sword

e.g. always able to foil her enemies
foiled the plot
acted as a foil for a comedian

24

fold

an enclosure for sheep
a flock of sheep; a group of people or institutions that share a common faith, belief, activity, or enthusiasm

e.g. He's performing a ritual to be accepted into the fold.

25

folly

lack of good sense or normal prudence and foresight
criminally or tragically foolish actions or conducts
a foolish act or idea

e.g. the folly of driving fast on steep, winding roads
The folly of such an action should be apparent to everyone.

26

foment

to promote the growth or development of; rouse, incite

e.g. foment a rebellion

27

fop

a man who is devoted to or vain about his appearance or dress; coxcomb, dandy

28

forage

food for animals especially when taken by browsing or grazing
ravage, raid
to make a search; rummage

e.g. He had to forage for firewood.

29

forbearance

a refraining from the enforcement of something (as a debt, right, or obligation) that is due
the act of forbearing; patience
the quality of being forbearing; leniency

e.g. We thank for your forbearance while we attend to the technical difficulties interrupting the TV program.

30

forbear

to hold oneself back from especially with an effort
hold back, abstain

e.g. He carefully forbore any mention of her name for fear of upsetting them.
We decided to forbear (from) provoking him any further.

31

forbidding

such as to make approach or passage difficult or impossible
disagreeable, repellent
grim, menacing

e.g. a harsh and forbidding landscape
a dark, forbidding house, that is reputed to be haunted

32

ford

a shallow part of a body of water that may be crossed by wading
to cross (a body of water) by wading

e.g. didn't attempt getting the horses across the stream until we had reached the ford

33

forebode

to have an inward conviction of (as coming ill or misfortune)
foretell, portend

e.g. That police car parked outside the house doesn't forebode well.

34

bodement

omen
something that is predicted; forecast

e.g. the continuing fascination with the obscure bodements of the 16th-century astrologer Nostradamus

35

foreknow

to have previous knowledge of; know beforehand especially by paranormal means or by revelation

e.g. What couple could possibly foreknow the trials and tribulations that marriage will bring?

36

forerunner

one that precedes and indicates the approach of another
predecessor, ancestor

e.g. a simple machine that was the forerunner of today's computers
I had that strange feeling that's the forerunner of a cold.

37

forestall

to prevent the normal trading in by buying or diverting goods or by persuading persons to raise prices
to exclude, hinder, or prevent by prior occupation or measures
to get ahead of; anticipate

e.g. Negotiations failed to forestall the conflict.
He forestalled critics by offering a defense of the project.

38

forestry

forestland
the science of developing, caring for, or cultivating forests
the management of growing timber

39

forfeit

something forfeited or subject to being forfeited; penalty
forfeiture especially of civil rights
something deposited (as for making a mistake in a game) and then redeemed on payment of a fine
to lose or lose the right to especially by some error, offense, or crime
to subject to confiscation as a forfeit; also, abandon, give up

e.g. The forfeit for each baseball player involved in the brawl was $5000.
He forfeited his right to a trial by jury.

40

forgo

to give up the enjoyment or advantage of; do without

e.g. She is planning to forgo her right to a trial and simply plead guilty.

41

formidable

causing fear, dread, or apprehension
having qualities that discourage approach or attack
tending to inspire awe or wonder; impressive

e.g. The mountains were a formidable barrier.
He has mastered a formidable amount of material.

42

forsake

to renounce or turn away from entirely

e.g. Forsaking most of our possessions, we evacuated just before the hurricane struck.
forsook the theater for politics

43

forthright

free from ambiguity or evasiveness; going straight to the point
notably simple in style or quality

e.g. She sometimes was a little too forthright for her own good and ended up saying things that inadvertently offended people.
forthright explanation of the situation

44

furtive

done in stealth; surreptitious
expressive of stealth; sly
obtained underhandedly; stolen

e.g. He cast a furtive glance in our direction.
We exchanged furtive smiles across the table.

45

vitiate

to make faulty or defective; impair
to debase in moral or aesthetic status
to make ineffective

e.g. The impact of the film was vitiated by poor acting.
believed that luxury vitiates even the most principled person

46

fortitude

strength of mind that enables a person to encounter danger or bear pain or adversity with courage

e.g. It was only with greatest fortitude that the Pilgrims were able to survive their first winter in Plymouth.

47

fortuitous

occurring by chance
fortunate, lucky
coming or happening by a lucky chance

e.g. From a cost standpoint, the company's timing is fortuitous.
could not have arrived at a more fortuitous time

48

fosse

a deep, wide ditch that is usually filled with water and that goes around the walls of a place (such as a castle) to protect it from being attacked; ditch, moat

e.g. The first like of defense is a water-filled fosse that enemy troops would have to cross.

49

fossilize

to convert into a fossil
to make outmoded, rigid, or fixed

e.g. The mud helped to preserve and fossilize the wood.

50

stymie

to present an obstacle to; stand in the way of

51

founder

to become disabled; especially, to go lame
to give away; collapse
to become submerged; sink
to come to grief; fail

e.g. Her career foundered, and she moved from job to job for several years.
trying to save a foundering career

52

four-poster

a bed with tall often carved corner posts originally designed to support curtains or a canopy

53

foyer

an anteroom or lobby especially of a theater; also, an entrance hallway; vestibule

e.g. Theatergoers crowded the foyer during the play's intermission.

54

fracas

a noisy quarrel; brawl

e.g. The police broke up the fracas in the bar and threw both combatants in the lockup.

55

fractious

tending to be troublesome; unruly
quarrelsome, irritable

e.g. a fractious crowd

56

noisome

noxious, harmful
offensive to senses and especially to the sense of smell
highly obnoxious or objectionable

e.g. It's no fun having asthma and living in an area with noisome smog.
a noisome remark about my weight that stuck with me for days

57

frantic

emotionally out of control
marked by fast and nervous, disordered, or anxiety-driven activity

e.g. They made a frantic search for the missing child.
frantic with fear

58

fraudulent

characterized by, based on, or done by fraud; deceitful

e.g. the victim of a fraudulent scheme

59

fraught

full of or accompanied by something specified (used with with)
causing or characterized by emotional distress or tension; uneasy

e.g. Every room in my childhood home is fraught with memories.
had a fraught meeting with his estranged wife to discuss a divorce settlememt

60

idyll

a narrative poem
a lighthearted carefree episode that is a fit subject for an idyll

e.g. Her year as a vineyard worker in the south of France was not the idyll that she had expected it to be.

61

freelancer

a person who acts independently without being affiliated with or authorized by an organization
a person who pursues a profession without a long-term commitment to any one employer

62

freight

cost
goods to be shipped; cargo; also, load, burden
meaning, significance
the ordinary transportation of goods; a train for such
also

e.g. trains that carry both passengers and freight
The order was shipped by freight.
It took six hours to freight the cargo airplane.

63

frenetic

frenzied, frantic

e.g. the frenetic rush to get every member of the cast in place before the curtain went up

64

frenzy

a temporary madness; a violent mental or emotional agitation
intense usually wild and often disorderly compulsive or agitated activity
also

e.g. a shopping frenzy
In its frenzy to flee the danger, the crowd became uncontrollable, and a number of people were trampled to death.
local football fans who were frenzied by the fact that their team was going to the Super Bowl

65

fresco

the art of painting on freshly spread moist lime plaster with water-based pigments
a painting executed in fresco

66

friable

easily crumbled or pulverized

e.g. friable soil

67

frieze

a sculptured or richly ornamented band (as on a building or piece of furniture)
a band, line, or series suggesting a frieze

e.g. A constant frieze of visitors wound its way around the ruins.

68

frigid

intensely cold; lacking warmth or ardor, indifferent
lacking imaginative qualities; insipid
abnormally averse to sexual intercourse

e.g. The frigid gusts of wind stung their faces.
She was born into an emotionally frigid family.

69

frigorific

causing cold; chilling

70

torrid

parched with heat especially of the sun; hot
giving off intense heat; scorching
ardent, passionate

e.g. the dry, torrid summers
The team had a torrid time trying to score.
torrid love letters

71

fringe

edge, periphery (oft. used in pl.)
one of various light or dark bands produced by the interference or diffraction of light
something that is marginal, additional, or secondary to some activity, process, or subject

e.g. operated on the fringes of the law
a fringe sport

72

frisky

inclined to frisk; playful
lively

e.g. The kids were frisky after all that candy
a frisky performance

73

frivolous

of little weight or importance
having no sound basis (as in fact or law)
lacking in seriousness; marked by unbecoming levity

e.g. a frivolous lawsuit
She thinks window shopping is a frivolous activity.

74

frond

a large leaf (especially of a palm or fern) usually with many divisions

75

frothy

foamy
gaily frivolous or light in content or treatment; insubstantial
made of light thin material

e.g. a frothy dessert made of whipped egg whites and fruit puree
a frothy comedy that wouldn't exert the brain of a gnat

76

frugal

characterized by or reflecting economy in the use of resources

e.g. By being frugal, the family is able to stretch its monthly budget.
a frugal meal of bread and cheese

77

fruition

pleasurable use or possession; enjoyment
the state of bearing fruit
realization

e.g. When she landed the lead in a Broadway play, a lifelong dream was brought to fruition.

78

fulcrum

prop; especially, the support about which a lever turns
one that supplies capability for action
a part of an animal that serves as a hinge or support

79

full-blown

fully mature; full-fledged
possessing or exhibiting all the usual or necessary features or symptoms

e.g. A general philosophy, if not a full-blown ideology, is emerging.

80

full-bodied

having a large body
(of a beverage) imparting to the palate the general impression of substantial weight and rich texture
having importance, significance, or meaningfulness

e.g. full-bodied study of literature

81

full-fledged

fully developed; total, complete
having attained complete status
full-blown

e.g. a full-fledged biography
full-fledged lawyer
a full-fledged reunion

82

fulminate

to utter or send out with denunciation

e.g. She was fulminating about the dangers of smoking.
The editorial fulminated against the proposed tax increase.

83

fulsome

characterized by abundance; copious
generous in amount, extent, or spirit
being full and well developed
aesthetically, morally, or generally offensive
exceeding the bounds of good taste; overdone
excessively complimentary or flattering; effusive

e.g. grateful survivors who were fulsome in their praise of the rescue team
The player's fulsome praise for the coach showed just how hard he was trying to be named captain of the team.
the fulsome chromium glitter of the escalators dominating the central hall

84

fumble

to make awkward attempts to do or find something
to search by trial and error
blunder
to feel one's way or move awkwardly

e.g. She fumbled in her pocket for her keys.
They fumbled a good opportunity to take control of the market.

85

fumigate

to apply smoke, vapor, or gas to especially for the purpose of disinfecting or of destroying pests

e.g. We had to fumigate our apartment to get rid of the ants.

86

functionary

one who serves in a certain function
one holding office in a government or political party

e.g. spoke to high-ranking functionaries at the embassy in the hopes that they could help

87

fungicide

an agent that destroys fungi or inhibits their growth

88

furor

an angry or maniacal fit; rage
a fashionable craze; vogue
fury, uproar

e.g. The book caused a furor across the country.
Amid a public furor, the senator continues to deny the allegations.

89

furrow

a trench in the earth made by a plow
a plowed field
a marked narrow depression; groove
a deep wrinkle
also

e.g. When he frowns, a deep furrow forms in his brow.
We had to furrow the field before we could plant the wheat.

90

fusillade

a number of shots fired simultaneously or in rapid succession
something that gives the effect of a fusillade
a spirited outburst especially of criticism

e.g. responded calmly to the fusillade of criticism leveled at his design for the memorial.

91

fuss

needless bustle or excitement
a show of flattering attention
a state of agitation especially over a trivial matter

e.g. They got down to business without any fuss.
Her new novel has caused quite a fuss.

92

fussy

easily upset; irritable
overly decorative
requiring or giving close attention to details
revealing a sometimes extreme concern for niceties; fastidious, picky

e.g. a fussy wallpaper design
fussy bookkeeping procedures
not fussy about where we eat

93

fusty

saturated with dust and stale odors; musty
rigidly old-fashioned or reactionary

e.g. couldn't stay too long in the fusty attic without sneezing

94

futile

serving no useful purpose; completely ineffective
occupied with trifles; frivolous

e.g. futile efforts to convince him
a futile and foolish gesture

95

gadfly

any of various flies that bite or annoy livestock
a person who stimulates or annoys especially by persistent criticism

e.g. a loud sports commentator who was a tactless gadfly during post-game interviews with the losing team

96

gaffe

a social or diplomatic blunder
a noticeable mistake

e.g. She realized that she had committed a huge gaffe when she started drinking from the finger bowl.

97

gaggle

flock; especially, a flock of geese when not in flight
a group, aggregation, or cluster lacking organization
an indefinite number

e.g. a gaggle of reporters and photographers
participated in a gaggle of petty crimes

98

gainsay

to declare to be untrue or invalid
contradict, oppose

e.g. They repeated tried to gainsay me, though every point I made was backed up by facts.
It can't be gainsaid that most people wish they had more time and money.

99

gait

a manner of walking or moving on foot
a manner or rate of movement or progress

e.g. He has an awkward gait.
the leisurely gait of summer

100

gall

bile; something bitter to endure; bitterness of spirit
brazen boldness coupled with impudent assurance and insolence
to fret and wear away by friction; chafe
irritate, vex

e.g. It galls me that such a small group of people can have so much power.
Move that rope so the sharp edge of the hull doesn't gall it.

101

gallant

a young man of fashion
ladies' man
showing in dress or bearing; smart
splendid, stately
spirited, brave; nobly chivalrous and often self-sacrificing

e.g. The defenders of the fort made a gallant stand.
He greeted her with a gallant bow.

102

galley

the kitchen of a ship or airplane
a long, low ship that was moved by oars and sails, used in ancient times by the Egyptians, Greeks, and others

103

galvanize

to stimulate or excite by or as if by an electric shock
to coat (iron or steel) with zinc

e.g. The group is hoping to galvanize public opinion against the proposed law.
a website galvanizing support for the project

104

lull

to cause to sleep or rest; soothe
to cause to relax vigilance

e.g. The absence of attacks for such an extended period had lulled the nation into a false sense of security.

105

gambol

to skip about in play; frisk, frolic
also

e.g. lambs gamboling in the meadow
She and her old college roommate headed off for one final European gambol before returning to the States to start their separate careers.

106

plod

to work laboriously and monotonously; drudge
to walk heavily or slowly; trudge
to proceed slowly or tediously

e.g. We plodded through mud that came up past our ankles.

107

gangway

passageway; especially, a temporary way of planks
a movable bridge used in boarding or leaving a ship at a pier; gangplank

108

gape

to open or part widely
to gaze stupidly or in openmouthed surprise or wonder
yawn

e.g. Holes gaped in the pavement.
She suddenly realized she had been gaping at the good-looking waiter instead of giving him her order.

109

garble

to sift impurities from
to so alter or distort as to create a wrong impression or change the meaning

e.g. The candidate complained that his views had been deliberately garbled by his opponent.
Garbled spices are less likely to contaminate a recipe.

110

gardenia

a large white or yellowish flower that has a pleasant smell

111

gargantuan

tremendous in size, volume, or degree; gigantic, colossal

e.g. gargantuan waterfalls
People seem to be buying ever more gargantuan SUVs these days.