Word List 10 Flashcards Preview

GRE Vocabulary > Word List 10 > Flashcards

Flashcards in Word List 10 Deck (126):
1

cumbersome

unwieldy because of heaviness and bulk
slow-moving; ponderous

e.g. The application process is cumbersome and time-consuming.

2

cumbersome

unwieldy because of heaviness and bulk
slow-moving; ponderous

e.g. The application process is cumbersome and time-consuming.

3

cumber

to hinder or encumber by being in the way
to clutter up

e.g. cumbered with heavy clothing
rocks cumbering the yard

4

cumulus

heap, accumulation
a dense puffy cloud form having a flat base and rounded outlines often piled up like a mountain

e.g. the cumulus of sundry things that fill up one's attic and somehow sum up a lifetime of experiences

5

cupidity

inordinate desire for wealth; avarice, greed
strong desire; lust

e.g. Reports of great treasure in the Indies inflamed the cupidity of Columbus's crew.

6

curator

one who has the care and superintendence of something, especially of a museum, zoo, or other place of exhibit

7

curate

to act as the curator of

e.g. curate a museum
an exhibit curated by the museum's director

8

curb

to check or control with or as if with a curb
also

e.g. The legislation is intended to curb price and wage increase.
These international regulations act as a curb on the plundering of a nation's archaeological treasures.

9

curdle

to form curds; also to congeal as if by forming curds
to go bad or wrong; spoil

e.g. A scream curdled in her throat.
Too much heat will curdle the custard.

10

curmudgeon

a crusty, ill-tempered, and usually old man

e.g Only a curmudgeon would object to the nursing home's holiday decorations.

11

goad

something that pains as if by pricking; thorn
something that urges or stimulates into reaction; spur
also

e.g. The threat of skin cancer - not to mention the prospect of wrinkles - should be sufficient goad for using sunscreen,
The threat of legal actions should goad them into complying.

12

cursory

rapidly and often superficially performed or produced; hasty

e.g. Only a cursory inspection of the building's electrical wiring was done.

13

cursory

14

cumber

to hinder or encumber by being in the way
to clutter up

e.g. cumbered with heavy clothing
rocks cumbering the yard

15

cumulus

heap, accumulation
a dense puffy cloud form having a flat base and rounded outlines often piled up like a mountain

e.g. the cumulus of sundry things that fill up one's attic and somehow sum up a lifetime of experiences

16

cupidity

inordinate desire for wealth; avarice, greed
strong desire; lust

e.g. Reports of great treasure in the Indies inflamed the cupidity of Columbus's crew.

17

cyclone

a storm or system of winds that rotates about a center of low atmospheric pressure, often bringing heavy rain

18

curate

to act as the curator of

e.g. curate a museum
an exhibit curated by the museum's director

19

curb

to check or control with or as if with a curb
also

e.g. The legislation is intended to curb price and wage increase.
These international regulations act as a curb on the plundering of a nation's archaeological treasures.

20

curdle

to form curds; also to congeal as if by forming curds
to go bad or wrong; spoil

e.g. A scream curdled in her throat.
Too much heat will curdle the custard.

21

curmudgeon

a crusty, ill-tempered, and usually old man

e.g Only a curmudgeon would object to the nursing home's holiday decorations.

22

goad

something that pains as if by pricking; thorn
something that urges or stimulates into reaction; spur
also

e.g. The threat of skin cancer - not to mention the prospect of wrinkles - should be sufficient goad for using sunscreen,
The threat of legal actions should goad them into complying.

23

curt

sparing of words; terse
marked by rude or peremptory shortness; brusque

e.g. wrote curt precise sentences
a curt refusal
She was offended by the curt reply to her well-meaning question.

24

cursory

25

curtail

to make less by or as if by cutting off or away some part

e.g. curtail the power of the executive branch
curtail inflation

26

customary

based on or established by custom
commonly practiced, used, or observed

e.g. It is customary to hold the door open.
She dressed in her customary fashion.

27

cuticle

an outer covering layer
dead or horny epidermis

28

damp

to diminish the activity or intensity of
dampen
moisture; humidity, dampness
discouragement, check

e.d refused to let the setbacks damp his drive for success

29

cyclone

a storm or system of winds that rotates about a center of low atmospheric pressure, often bringing heavy rain

30

cyclamate

an artificially prepared salt of sodium or calcium used especially formerly as a sweetener

31

cyclopedia

encyclopedia

32

cynic

a faultfinding captious critic, especially one who believes that human conflict is motivated wholly by self-interest

e.g. A cynic might think that the governor visited the hospital just to gain votes.

33

cypress

any of a genus of evergreen trees and shrubs with small overlapping leaves resembling scales
any of several coniferous trees of the cypress family or the bald cypress family

34

cytology

a branch of biology dealing with the structure, function, multiplication, pathology, and life history of cells

35

dabble

to wet by splashing or by little dips or strokes; spatter
to work or involve oneself superficially or intermittently especially in a secondary activity or interest

e.g. dabbles in art

36

daft

silly, foolish
mad, insane

37

daguerreotype

an early photograph produced on a silver or a silver-covered copper plate; also the process of producing such photographs

38

dainty

something delicious to the taste; something choice or pleasing
tasting good; attractively prepared and served
marked by delicate or diminutive beauty, form, or grace
marked by fastidious discrimination or finicky taste

e.g. The widow plied her suitor with dainties and endless glasses of sherry.
dainty teacups

39

dally

to act playfully, especially to play amorously
to deal lightly; toy
to waste time; linger, dawdle

e.g. accused of dallying with a serious problem
The two of us dallied over our coffee that morning.
dally time away

40

deadlock

a state of inaction or neutralization resulting from the opposition of equally powerful uncompromising persons or factions; standstill
a tie score

e.g. The deadlock was broken with a key compromise.

41

dampen

to check or diminish the activity or vigor of; deaden

e.g. We wouldn't let the bad weather dampen our excitement.

42

dandy

a man who gives exaggerated attention to personal appearance
something excellent in its class
of, relating to, or suggestive of a dandy
very good; first-rate

e.g. a dandy place

43

dapper

neat and trim in appearance; very spruce and stylish
alert and lively in movement and manners

e.g. The dapper gentlemen drew admiring glances from all over the ballroom.

44

dappled

marked with small spots or patches contrasting with the background

e.g. a forest that was vibrant with the dappled foliage of autumn

45

daredevil

recklessly and often ostentatiously daring
a recklessly bold person

e.g. daredevil stunts/ a daredevil driver

46

dart

to throw with a sudden movement
to thrust or move with sudden speed
to shoot with a dart containing a usually tranquilizing drug
also

e.g. The frog darted its tongue at a fly.
He darted across the street.

47

daunt

the lessen the courage of; cow, subdue

e.g. The raging inferno didn't daunt the firefighters for a moment.

48

gaunt

excessively thin and angular
barren, desolate

e.g. He left the hospital looking tired and gaunt.
a gaunt factory on the edge of town

49

vaunt

to make a vain display of one's own worth or attainments; brag
to call attention to pridefully and often boastfully

e.g. Even the noblest of fellows have been known to vaunt a bit.
people who vaunt their ingenuity

50

dawdle

to spend time idly; to move lackadaisically

e.g. Hurry up! There's no time to dawdle.
dawdles the day away

51

hie

to go quickly; hasten
to cause (oneself) to go quickly

e.g. We had best hie home before the snow gets worse.

52

debrief

to interrogate (as a pilot) usually upon return (as from a mission) in order to obtain useful information
to carefully review upon completion

e.g. Police debriefed the hostages upon their return.
debrief the flight

53

dealing

method of business; manner of conduct
(pl.) friendly or business interaction

e.g. There were reports of shady dealings between the two sides.

54

dearth

. scarcity that makes dear, specifically famine
an inadequate supply; lack

e.g. a dearth of evidence

55

glut

to fill especially with food to satiety
to flood (the market) with goods so that supply exceeds demand
also oversupply

56

debacle

a tumultuous breakup of ice in a river
a violent disruption (as of an army); rout
a great disaster; a complete failure, fiasco

57

debark

disembark
to remove bark from

58

debase

to lower in status, esteem, quality, or character

e.g. The holiday has been debased by commercialism.

59

rebate

to reduce the force or activity of; diminish
to reduce the sharpness of; blunt
to make a rebate of; to give a rebate to
a return of a part of a payment

e.g. a $50 rebate offered with the printer
a rebate on the taxes

60

debilitate

to impair the strength of; enfeeble

e.g. The virus debilitates the body's immune system.

61

debouch

to cause to emerge; discharge
to mark out into open ground
emerge, issue

e.g. troops debouching from the town
rivers debouching into the sea

62

debauch

to lead away from virtue or excellence
to corrupt by intemperance or sensuality

e.g. The long stay on a tropical isle had debauched the ship's crew to the point where they no longer acted liked naval professionals.

63

debrief

to interrogate (as a pilot) usually upon return (as from a mission) in order to obtain useful information
to carefully review upon completion

e.g. Police debriefed the hostages upon their return.
debrief the flight

64

debunk

to expose the sham or falseness of

e.g. debunk a theory

65

decadent

marked by decay or decline
of, relating to, or having the characteristics of the decadents
characterized by or appealing to self-indulgence
one of a group of late 19th century French and English writers tending toward artificial and unconventional subjects and subtilized style

e.g. a wealthy and decadent lifestyle

66

default

failure to do something required by duty or law; neglect
failure to pay financial debts
a selection made usually automatically or without active consideration due to lack of a viable alternative

e.g. The defendant has made no appearance in the case and is in default.

67

declaim

to speak rhetorically, specifically to recite something as an exercise in elocution
to speak pompously or bombastically; harangue

e.g. The actress declaimed her lines with passion.

68

decorum

literary and dramatic propriety; fitness
propriety and good taste in conduct or appearance
orderliness
(pl.) the conventions of polite behavior

69

decorous

marked by propriety and good taste; correct

e.g. decorous conduct

70

decrepit

wasted and weakened by or as if by the infirmities of old age
impaired by use or wear; worn-out
fallen into ruin or disrepair
dilapidated, run-down

71

decry

to depreciate (as a coin) officially or public
to express strong disapproval of

e.g. Violence on television is generally decried as harmful to children.

72

deduce

to determine by deduction; specifically to infer from a general principle
to trace the course of

73

deduct

to take away (an amount) from a total; subtract
deduce, infer

74

defile

to make unclean or impure (as debase or make physically unclean)
to violate the sanctity of; desecrate
sully, dishonor
a narrow passage or gorge

e.g. the countryside defiled by billboards
boots defiled with blood
defile a sanctuary
The cattle, once they were cornered in the defile, were quickly rounded up.

75

deface

to mar the appearance of; injure by effacing significant details
impair

e.g. deface an inscription

76

boldfaced

bold in manner or conduct; impudent

77

default

failure to do something required by duty or law; neglect
failure to pay financial debts
a selection made usually automatically or without active consideration due to lack of a viable alternative

e.g. The defendant has made no appearance in the case and is in default.

78

defect

to forsake one cause, party, or nation for another often because of a change in ideology
to leave one situation (as a job) often to go over to a rival

e.g. She defected from the conservative party.
The reporter defected to another network.

79

defendant

a person required to make answer in a legal action or suit

80

plaintiff

a person who brings a legal action

81

defer

put off, delay [deferment]
to delegate to another
to submit to another's wishes, opinion, or governance usually through deference or respect

e.g. deferred buying a car until spring
deferred to her father's wishes

82

deference

respect and esteem due to a superior or an elder; also affected or ingratiating regard for another's wishes

e.g. He is shown much deference by his colleagues.

83

deferential

- deference

e.g. The man had the deferential attitude of someone who had been a servant his entire life.

84

deficit

deficiency in amount or quality; a lack or impairment in a functional capacity
disadvantage
an excess or expenditure over revenue; a loss in business operation

e.g. a deficit in rainfall
cognitive deficits
a deficit of $3 billion

85

defile

to make unclean or impure (as debase or make physically unclean)
to violate the sanctity of; desecrate
sully, dishonor
a narrow passage or gorge

e.g. the countryside defiled by billboards
boots defiled with blood
defile a sanctuary
The cattle, once they were cornered in the defile, were quickly rounded up.

86

provisional

serving for the time being; temporary

e.g. a provisional government

87

deflate

to release air or gas from
to reduce in size, importance, or effectiveness
to reduce or cause to contract

e.g. The harsh criticism left him utterly deflated.
deflate his ego with cutting remarks

88

flatus

gas generated in the stomach or bowels

89

deliberate

to think about or discuss issues and decisions carefully
characterized by or resulting from careful and thorough consideration
characterized by awareness of the consequences
slow, unhurried, and steady as though allowing time for decision on each individual action involved

e.g. The jury deliberated for two days before reaching a verdict.
a deliberate decision/ deliberate falsehood
He advocates a slow and deliberate approach to the problem.

90

defraud

to deprive of something by deception or fraud

e.g. Dishonest employees defrauded the firm of millions of dollars.

91

precipitate

to throw violently; hurl
to bring about especially abruptly
to cause to separate from solution or suspension
also
falling, flowing, or rushing with steep descent; precipitous, steep
exhibiting violent or unwise speed

e.g. Her death precipitated a family crisis.
The exodus from the cities was an unexpected precipitate of the automobile, which effectively shrank distances.
the army's precipitate withdrawal from the field of battle

92

foment

to promote the growth or development of; rouse, incite

e.g. foment a rebellion

93

deign

to condescend reluctantly and with a strong sense of the affront to one's superiority that is involved; stoop

e.g. I would not deign to answer that absurd question.

94

dejected

cast down in spirits; depressed

95

delectable

highly pleasing, delightful
delicious

e.g. a delectable melody/gentleman
a delectable meal

96

delegate

a person acting for another
to entrust to another
to appoint as one's representative

e.g. the U.N. delegated from African countries
A manager should delegate authority to the best employees.

97

deleterious

harmful often in a subtle or unexpected way

e.g. deleterious effects
deleterious to health

98

salutary

producing a beneficial effect; remedial
promoting health; curative

e.g. salutary influences

99

salubrious

favorable to or promoting health or well-being

e.g. salubrious habits

100

deliberate

101

impetuous

marked by impulsive vehemence or passion
marked by force and violence of movement or action

e.g. an impetuous temperament
an impetuous wind/young man

102

precipitate

to throw violently; hurl
to bring about especially abruptly
to cause to separate from solution or suspension
also
falling, flowing, or rushing with steep descent; precipitous, steep
exhibiting violent or unwise speed

e.g. Her death precipitated a family crisis.
The exodus from the cities was an unexpected precipitate of the automobile, which effectively shrank distances.
the army;s precipitate withdrawal from the field of battle

103

delimit

to fix or define the limits of

e.g. Strict guidelines delimit his responsibilities.
The highway delimits the eastern edge of the downtown area.

104

limn

to draw or paint on a surface
to outline in clear sharp detail; delineate
describe

e.g. He limned the scene in the courtroom so perfectly that I could practically see it.

105

delinquent

a delinquent person
offending by neglect or violation of duty or law
being overdue in payment

e.g. delinquent behavior
a delinquent charge account

106

delude

to mislead the mind or judgment of; deceive, trick

e.g. We deluded ourselves into thinking that the ice cream wouldn't affect our diet.

107

deluge

an overflowing of the land by water; a drenching rain
an overwhelming amount of number
also

e.g. a deluge of thanks and appreciation for the returning troops
Heavy rain deluged the region.
deluged with requests for help

108

deluvial

- deluge

109

delve

to dig or labor with or as if with a spade
to make a careful or detailed search for information; to examine a subject in detail

e.g. He tried to delve inside his memory for clues about what had happened.

110

demean

to conduct or behave (oneself) usually in a proper manner
to lower in character, status, or reputation

111

demise

to convey (as an estate by will or lease)
to transmit by succession or inheritance
die, decease
also

e.g. The property has demised to the king's heirs.
The musician met an untimely demise.

112

demography

the statistical study of human populations especially with reference to size and density, distribution, and vital statistics

113

demonstrate

to show clearly
to make a demonstration

e.g. Each student must demonstrate mastery of the subject matter in order to pass the class.
crowds demonstrating for the right to vote

114

demonstrative

demonstrating as real or true
characterized or established by demonstration
marked by display of feeling; inclined to display feelings openly

115

demoralize

to corrupt the morals of
to weaken the morale of; discourage, dispirit
to upset or destroy the normal functioning of; to throw into disorder

e.g. We refused to be demoralized by our humiliating defeat and vowed to come roaring back.

116

demote

to reduce to a lower grade or rank
to relegate to a less important position

117

demotic

popular, common

e.g. demotic idiom

118

demur

to file a demurrer
to take exception; object (usually used with to or at)

e.g. Don't hesitate to demur to the idea if you have any qualms.

119

demure

reserved, modest
affectedly modest, reserved, or serious; coy

e.g. the demure charm of the cottage

120

denigrate

to attack the reputation of; defame
to deny the importance or validity of; belittle

e.g. denigrate one's opponent
denigrate their achievements

121

denizen

inhabitant
a person admitted to residence in a foreign country, especially an alien admitted to rights of citizenship
one of frequents a place

e.g. nightclub denizens
The polar bear is an iconic denizen of the snowy Arctic.

122

denomination

an act of denominating
a value or size of a series of values or sizes (as of money)
name, designation, especially a general name for a category
a religious organization whose congregations are united in their adherence to its belief and practices

123

denote

to serve as an indication of; betoken
to serve as an arbitrary mark for
to make known; announce
to serve as a linguistic expression of the notion of; mean

e.g. The swollen bellies denote starvation.
red flares denoting danger
His crestfallen look denoted his distress.

124

connote

to be associated with or inseparable from as a consequence of concomitant
to convey in addition to exact explicit meaning

e.g. the remorse so often connoted by guilt
all the misery that poverty connotes

125

denouement

the final outcome of the main dramatic complication in a literary work
the outcome of a complex sequence of events

e.g. In the play's denouement, the two lovers kill themselves.

126

denounce

to pronounce especially publicly to be blameworthy or evil
to inform against; accuse

e.g. The film was denounced for the way it portrayed its female characters.