Word List 5 Flashcards Preview

GRE Vocabulary > Word List 5 > Flashcards

Flashcards in Word List 5 Deck (109):
1

bewilder

to cause to lose one's bearings
to perplex or confuse especially by a complexity, variety, or multitude of objects or considerations

e.g. The change in policy seems to have bewildered many of our customers.

2

bibliophile

a lover of books especially for qualities of format; also a book collector

e.g. For bibliophiles, no electronic device could possibly give the tactile pleasure of a beautifully bound book.

3

bicker

to engage in a petulant or petty quarrel

e.g. bickering over money

4

bifurcate

to (also cause to) divide into two branches or parts

e.g. The stream bifurcated into two narrow winding channels.
bifurcate a beam of light

5

coalesce

to grow together
to unite into a whole, fuse; to unite for a common end
to arise from the combination of distinct elements

e.g. a group of young reformers who gradually coalesced into a political movement
An organized and a popular resistance immediately coalesced.

6

bigotry

the state of mind of a bigot
acts or beliefs characteristic of a bigot

e.g. A deeply ingrained bigotry prevented her from even considering the counterarguments.

7

bile

a yellow or greenish viscid alkaline fluid secreted by the liver
inclination to anger; acrimony, vitriol

e.g. With considerable bile, the author recounts a childhood filled with misery and loneliness.

8

bilk

to block the free development of; frustrate
to cheat out of something valuable; defraud
to evade payment of or to
to slip away from

e.g. Fate bilks their hopes.
An investigation revealed that the garage had been bilking motorists for repairs that had never been made.
to bilk his creditors
She bilked her pursuers.

9

billowy

similar to wave, especially a great wave or surge of water
resembling a rolling mass (as of flame or smoke)

10

biped

a two-footed animal

11

podiatry

the medical care and treatment of the human foot

12

bit

the biting or cutting edge or part of a tool

13

blanch

to bleach
to make ashen or pale

e.g. She blanched and remained silent when the store owner accused her of taking the money.

14

bland

dull, insipid
smooth and soothing in manner or quality
exhibiting no personal concern or embarrassment; unperturbed

e.g. The diplomat's bland statement did nothing to calm the situation.
bland soup

15

blandish

to coax with flattery; cajole
to act or speak in a flattering or coaxing manner

e.g. They blandished her into doing their work for them by complimenting her shamelessly.

16

blatant

noisy especially in a vulgar or offensive manner; clamorous
completely obvious, conspicuous, or obtrusive especially in a crass or offensive manner; brazen

e.g. a blatant clamor for the impeachment of the scandal-plagued governor
blatant disregard for the rules

17

blatter

to talk noisily and fast

18

blazon

armorial bearings
ostentatious display
to publish widely; proclaim
to pain or depict with accurate details
display, adorn

e.g. Their public canoodling has pretty much blazoned the fact that they are having an affair.
The city's waterfront has been blazoned with banners celebrating the festival of tall ships.

19

bleak

exposed and barren and often windswept
cold, raw; lacking in warmth, life, or kindliness; grim
not hopeful or encouraging; depressing
severely simple or austere

e.g. a bleak November evening
a bleak outlook for the team for the rest of the season

20

blemish

to spoil by a flaw
a noticeable imperfection, especially one that seriously impairs appearance

e.g. The incident blemished his reputation.
The book fails to mention any of the organization's many blemishes.

21

blight

a disease or injury of plans marked by the formation of lesions, withering, and deaths of parts
something that frustrates plans or hopes
to damage

e.g. The expanding urban sprawl is a blight on the countryside.
Builders blighted the land with malls and parking lots.

22

blithe

of a happy lighthearted character or disposition
lacking due thought or consideration; casual, heedless

e.g. a blithe spirit
He showed blithe disregard for the rights of others.

23

blotch

to mark or mar with blotches
imperfection, blemish
a spot or mark (as of color or ink) especially when large and irregular

e.g. He blotched the bedroom walls with various shades of blue to give them a textured effect.
a dog with a single small blotch of black

24

blowhard

braggart
windbag, an exhaustively talkative person

e.g. a politician who is the stereotypical backslapping blowhard

25

blue

depressed, melancholy

26

blueprint

photographic print of building plans
detailed plan

27

blunder

to move unsteadily or confusedly
to make a mistake (in) through stupidity, ignorance, or carelessness

e.g. We blundered along through the woods until we finally found the trail.
The government blundered by not acting sooner.

28

blunt

slow or deficient in feeling; insensitive
obtuse in understanding or discernment; dull
having an edge or point that is not sharp
abrupt in speech or manner; being straight to the point; direct

e.g. a blunt instrument
He was blunt about needing more space.

29

hone

to sharpen or smooth with a whetstone
to make more acute, intense, or effective; whet

e.g. to hone one's skills

30

whet

to sharpen by rubbing on or with something (as a stone)
to make keen or more acute; excite, stimulate

e.g. whet a knife
We had some wine to whet our appetites.

31

blurb

a short publicity notice (as on a book jacket)

32

lush

growing vigorously especially with luxuriant foliage
appealing to senses; savory, delicious; opulent, sumptuous

e.g. The frequent rainfall encourages the lush growth of trees, ferns, and shrubs.
lush accommodations/sounds of the orchestra

33

bluster

to talk or act with noisy swaggering threats
to blow in stormy noisy gusts; to be windy and boisterous

e.g. He brags and blusters, but he never does what he says he'll do.
The wind blustered through the valley.

34

bog

wet spongy ground
to cause to sink into or as if into a bog; impede, mire (usually used with down)

e.g. They can bog down any other agency by encumbering agency rules or policies.

35

boggle

to start with fright or amazement; be overwhelmed
to hesitate because of doubt, fear, scruples
mishandle, bungle

e.g. The mind boggles at the research needed.
She boggled her first effort to make cookies.

36

bogus

not genuine; counterfeit, sham

e.g. The museum quickly discovered that the painting was bogus.

37

boisterous

noisily turbulent; rowdy
marked by or expressive of exuberance and high spirits
stormy, tumultuous

e.g. The fans at the baseball game became particularly boisterous after the home run.

38

bolster

a long pillow or cushion; a structural part designed to eliminate friction or provide support or bearing
to support with or as if with a bolster; reinforce
to give a boost to

e.g. a convincing argument that was bolstered by the speaker's reputation

39

bolt

a wood or metal bar used to fasten a door
a metal rod or pin for fastening objects together
to move suddenly or nervously; start
to move or proceed rapidly; dash
to dart off or away; flee

40

preposterous

contrary to nature, reason, or common sense; absurd

41

bombast

pretentious inflated speech or writing

e.g. The other world leaders at the international conference had little interest in being subjected to the president's bombast.

42

bonnet

a brimless Scottish cap of seamless woolen fabric
a metal covering

43

bonny

attractive, fair; fine, excellent

44

boon

benefit, favor, especially one that is given in answer to a request
a timely benefit; blessing

e.g. The couple's generous donation was a great boon to the charity's fundraising campaign.

45

boor

peasant
a rude or insensitive person

e.g. a loudmouthed boor who embarrassed his family at every social event they attended

46

bootless

useless, unprofitable

e.g. a bootless attempt to get tickets to the sold-out game

47

bore

to make a hole
to cause to fell boredom
a hole
a tiresome, dull person

48

boulder

a detached and rounded or much-worn mass of rock

49

bouquet

flowers picked and fastened together in a bunch; nosegay
medley
compliment
a distinctive and characteristic fragrance (as of wine); a subtle aroma or quality (as of an artistic performance)

e.g. The drama critics greeted her performance with bouquets.

50

coquet

to play the coquette; flirt
to deal with something playfully rather than seriously

51

bourgeois

of, relating to, or characteristic of the social middle class
marked by a concern for material interests and respectability and a tendency toward mediocrity
dominated by commercial and industrial interests; capitalist

52

bout

a spell of activity (as an athletic match); outbreak, attack, session

e.g. She is currently suffering from a bout of the flu.

53

boycott

to engage in a concerted refusal to having dealings with (as a person, store, or organization) usually to express disapproval or to force acceptance or certain conditions

e.g. We boycotted companies that were polluting the environment.

54

brace

to strengthen
prepare
fastener

e.g. Brace yourself for the shock.
He braced the gate with a piece of wood.

55

bracing

giving strength, vigor, or freshness

e.g. a chilly but bracing day
a bracing breeze

56

vapid

lacking liveliness, tang, briskness, or force; flat, dull

e.g. a gossipy, vapid woman, obsessed by her own elegance

57

bracket

wooden or metal angle shaped support

58

braggadocio

braggart
empty boasting; arrogant pretension, cockiness

e.g. His braggadocio hid the fact that he felt personally inadequate.

59

brake

a device for arresting or preventing motion
to retard or stop by or as if by a brake

60

brandish

to shake or wave (as a weapon) menacingly
to exhibit in an ostentatious or aggressive manner

e.g. I could see that he was brandishing a knife.
As with his Harvard degree, he didn't hesitate to brandish his pretty wife.

61

brash

brittle
heedless of the consequences; audacious, rash
full of fresh raw vitality
aggressively self-assertive; impudent

e.g. a brash adventurer/frontier town
a brash request to get something for free

62

brassy

shamelessly bold
resistant to control, marked by unruly or aggressive noisiness; obstreperous

e.g. A brassy customer insisted on arriving late and still being taken first.

63

bravado

blustering swaggering conduct
a pretense of bravery

e.g. His stories are always told with bravado.

64

bravura

a musical passage requiring exceptional agility and technical skill in execution
a florid brilliant style; a show of daring or brilliance
marked by a dazzling display of skill
ornate, showy

e.g. A truly bravura performance of the ballet brought the crowd to its feed.

65

brawl

a rough, noisy quarrel or fight
also

66

brazen

marked by contemptuous boldness

e.g. a brazen demand for special treatment just because she is rich

67

brazier

one who works in brass
a pan for holding burning coals

68

bricklayer

a person who lays bricks

69

bridle

a headgear with which a horse is governed
curb, restraint
to restrain, check, or control
to show hostility or resentment (as to an affront to one's pride or dignity)

e.g. set a bridle on his power
try to bridle your criticism next time so that it is helpful and not hurtful

70

brink

the edge of a steep place; verge, border

71

brisk

keenly alert; lively
fresh, invigorating (brisk weather)
energetic, quick; marked by much activity

e.g. a brisk walk
Business was brisk.

72

bristle

a short stiff coarse hair or filament
to rise and stand stiffly erect
to take on an aggressively defensive attitude (as in response to a slight or criticism)
to be full of something specified

e.g. Electricity makes your hair bristle.
He bristled at the accusations of corruption.
a recent college grad thrilled to be starting a new life in a city bristling with possibilities

73

gristle

cartilage
tough cartilaginous, tendinous, or fibrous matter especially in table meats

74

broach

to draw (beer, liquor, etc.) as by tapping
to make known for the first time; to open up (a subject) for discussion

e.g. Some of his supporters remain so passionate that the subject can be difficult to broach.

75

broker

one who acts as an intermediary

76

bromide

a commonplace or tiresome person; bore
a commonplace or hackneyed statement or notion

e.g. a newspaper editorial offering the timeworn bromide that people should settle their differences peacefully

77

brood

the young of an animal or a family of young
a group having a common nature or origin
to think anxiously or gloomily about; ponder

e.g. He brooded over his mistake.

78

brook

a small stream

79

browbeat

to intimidate or disconcert by a stern manner or arrogant speech; bully

e.g. They browbeat him into signing the document.

80

bruit

noise
to voice abroad; rumor (usually used passively with about)

e.g. Word of his imminent dismissal was bruited about.

81

brunt

the principal force, shock, or stress
the greater part

e.g. The brunt of the responsibility fell on her shoulders.

82

brusque

markedly short and abrupt
blunt in manner or speech often to the point of ungracious harshness

e.g. She asked for a cup of coffee and received a brusque reply: "We don't have any."

83

buck

to oppose; resist
a male deer or antelope

84

bucolic

of or relating to shepherds or herdsmen; pastoral
relating to or typical of rural life; idyllic

e.g. a bucolic region where farms are still common

85

buffoon

a ludicrous figure; clown
a gross and usually ill-educated or stupid person

86

bulb

an underground but as in a lily, onion, etc.

87

bulge

to swell; protrude or project
also

88

bumptious

presumptuously, obtusely, and often noisily self-assertive; obtrusive

e.g. a bumptious young man whose family wealth gave him a sense of entitlement

89

bungle

to act or work clumsily and awkwardly
mishandle, botch

e.g. She bungled the job the first tie she tried to do it.

90

buoy

support, uplift
to raise the spirits of (usually used with up)

e.g. The tax breaks should help to buoy the economy.
Hope buoys him up.

91

buoyant

cheerful
capable of maintaining a satisfactory high level

e.g. The actors were buoyant as they prepared for the evening's performance.
a buoyant economy

92

burgeon

to bloom
to grow and expand rapidly; flourish

e.g. The trout population in the stream is burgeoning now that the water is clean.

93

burlesque

parody
derisive caricature

94

burly

strongly and heavily built; husky

95

burnish

to make shiny or lustrous especially by rubbing; polish
luster, gloss

e.g. He burnished the floor of the ballroom to a soft luster.
After some much-needed polishing, the silver tea set had a brilliant burnish.

96

bust

a sculptured representation of the upper part of the human figure, including the head and neck and usually part of the shoulders and breast

97

buttress

a structure built against a wall to support it
something that supports or strengthens
to support, strengthen, or defend

e.g. The mother had always been the buttress of our family in trying time.
The treaty will buttress the cause of peace.

98

byline

a line identifying the writer

99

contravene

to go or act contrary to; violate
to oppose in argument; contradict

e.g. The unauthorized reproduction of the image contravenes copyright laws.
contravene a proposition

100

bystander

one present but not taking part in a situation or event

101

byzantine

of, relating to, or characterized by a devious and usually surreptitious manner of operation
intricately involved; labyrinthine

e.g. a byzantine power struggle
rules of byzantine complexity

102

cabal

a conspiratorial group of plotters

e.g. a conspiracy theory about the existence of an international cabal devoted to world domination

103

cache

a hiding place especially for concealing and preserving provisions or implements
a secure place of storage
to place, hide, or store in a cache

e.g. They cached the fugitive slaves in their cellar until they could make their way to Canada.

104

cacophony

harsh, jarring sound

105

mellifluous

having a smooth rich flow
filled with something (as honey) that sweetens

e.g. a mellifluous voice

106

dulcet

sweet to the taste
pleasing to the ear
generally pleasing or agreeable

e.g. the dulcet tones of her voice
Although she flashed a dulcet smile, she was secretly seething with resentment.

107

cadet

a student at a military school

108

cadge

beg, sponge

e.g. cadge a free cup of coffee

109

cajole

to persuade with flattery or gentle urging especially in the face of reluctance; coax
to obtain from someone by gentle persuasion

e.g. He cajoled her into doing his laundry for him.
cajole money from his parents