Word List 47 Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Word List 47 Deck (68):
1

sanatorium

an establishment that provides therapy combined with a regimen for treatment or rehabilitation
an establishment for the treatment of the chronically ill

2

sangfroid

self-possession or imperturbability especially under strain

e.g. The professional gambler seemed to take both his wins and his losses with remarkable sangfroid.

3

sapling

a young tree
youth

4

sardonic

disdainfully or skeptically humorous; derisively mocking

e.g. a sardonic little jab that made her visitor quiet and subdued for the rest of the night

5

sate

to cloy with overabundance; glut
to appease (as a thirst) by indulging to the full

e.g. sate the appetite of vampire-hungry fans

6

scabrous

difficult, knotty
rough to touch
dealing with suggestive, indecent, or scandalous themes; salacious; also, squalid

e.g. a scabrous problem
scabrous paint/skin
a movie with scabrous humor

7

scad

(informal) a great number or quantity

8

paucity

smallness of number; fewness
smallness of quantity; dearth

e.g. a paucity of useful answers to the problem of traffic congestion at rush hour

9

scamper

to run nimbly and usually playfully about

10

scarp

a line of cliffs produced by faulting or erosion
a low steep slope along a beach caused by wave erosion

11

scintillate

to emit sparks; spark
to throw off as a spark or as sparkling flashes

e.g. star scintillating in the sky
scintillate witticisms

12

scission

a division or split in a group or union; schism

e.g. fears that the scission of the labor union will compromise the workers' bargaining power

13

scour

to rub or scrub
to clean by purging; purge
to move about quickly especially in search

e.g. They scoured the grounds for the missing keys.

14

screed

a lengthy discourse

e.g. In her screed against the recording industry, she blamed her producer for ruining her career.

15

scrumptious

delightful, excellent; especially, delicious

16

scud

to move or run swiftly especially as if driven forward
rush
loose vapory clouds driven swiftly by the wind
a slight sudden shower
a gust of wind

e.g. clouds scudding across the sky
A cold scud sent leaves skittering down from the trees.

17

scutter

scurry, scamper

18

seafaring

the use of the sea for travel or transportation

19

seclude

to remove or separate from intercourse or outside influence; isolate
shut off, screen

e.g. seclude themselves from the turmoil of secular affairs

20

sedition

incitement of resistance to or insurrection against lawful authority

e.g. The leaders of the group have been arrested and charged with sedition.

21

seditious

- sedition

e.g. Several dissidents were jailed for leading protests that the government branded as seditious.

22

senile

of, relating to, exhibiting, or characteristic of old age; especially, exhibiting a loss of cognitive abilities associated with old age

23

sententious

given to or abounding in aphoristic expression
given to or abounding in excessive moralizing
terse, aphoristic, or moralistic in expression; pithy, epigrammatic

e.g. a smug and sententious writer
a sententious crank who has written countless letters to the editor about the decline in family values

24

sequacious

intellectually servile; (of a person) lacking independence or originality of thought

e.g. The human race is gregarious and sequacious, rather than individual and adventurous.

25

sequela

an aftereffect of a disease, condition, or injury
a secondary result

26

serendipity

the faculty or phenomenon of finding valuable or agreeable things not sought for; also, an instance of this

e.g. They found each other by pure serendipity.

27

sermonize

to compose or deliver a sermon
to speak didactically or dogmatically

e.g. a teacher who can talk to her students about serious subjects without sermonizing

28

shanty

a small crudely built dwelling or shelter usually of wood

29

shawl

a square or oblong usually fabric garment or wrapper used especially as a covering for the head or shoulders

30

sheaf

a quantity of stalks and ears of a cereal grass or sometimes other plant material bound together
a large amount or number

e.g. contends that casino gambling would generate a sheaf of social problems for the state

31

sheen

a bright or shining condition; brightness

e.g. polished the metal until it had an even sheen

32

shibboleth

a word or saying used by adherents of a party, sect, or belief and usually regarded by others as empty of real meaning
a widely held belief; also, truism, platitude
a custom or usage regarded as distinct of a group

e.g. She repeated the old shibboleth that time heals all wounds.
Accent was a shibboleth of social class.

33

shuffle

to work into or out of trickily
to act or speak in a shifty or evasive manner

e.g. shuffle out of the difficulty

34

sidesplitting

extremely funny

35

sidle

to go or move with one side foremost especially in a furtive advance
to cause to move or turn sideways

e.g. sidle up to him and slip him a note
sidle through the narrow opening

36

simian

of, relating to, or resembling monkeys or apes
monkey, ape

37

skittish

lively or frisky in action; capricious
easily frightened; restive
coy, bashful; also, wary

e.g. a skittish horse
skittish about taking on such a large mortgage

38

skulduggery

underhanded or unscrupulous behavior; also, a devious device or trick

e.g. The company's apparently healthy bottom line was merely an illusion, the result of years of accounting skulduggery.

39

slapdash

haphazard, slipshod

e.g. The investigation of the charges against the mayor was slapdash and not very thorough.

40

slaver

drool, slobber
to fawn

e.g. a dog slavering over a bone
suburbanites slavering over drop-dead models

41

sleazy

lacking firmness of texture; flimsy
marked by low character or quality
squalid, dilapidated

e.g. a dancer in a sleazy outfit
a sleazy lothario who is always on the make

42

sleight

deceitful craftiness; also, stratagem
dexterity, skill

e.g. employ some sophisticated sleight to con that wary couple out of their money
a brilliant new theory that pays tribute to his remarkable sleight of mind

43

slobber

drool
to indulge the feelings effusively and without restraint
driveling, sloppy, or incoherent utterance

e.g. The baby just slobbered on the blanket.

44

sloven

one habitually negligent of neatness or cleanliness especially in personal appearance

45

slew

to turn about a fixed point
to cause to skid; veer

e.g. slew a car around a turn

46

slump

to fall or sink suddenly
also

e.g. slumping sales
The economy has been in a slump since last year.

47

snappish

given to curt irritable speech
arising from annoyance or irascibility
inclined to bite

e.g. a snappish remark/dog

48

snappy

quickly made or done
marked by vigor or liveliness
briskly cold
stylish, smart

e.g. a snappy decision
snappy dialogue / a snappy dresser

49

sojourn

a temporary stay

e.g. The family enjoyed a two-week sojourn in the mountains.

50

somnolent

sleep-inducing
inclined to or heavy with sleep; drowsy
sluggish

e.g. a somnolent sermon
somnolent rivers

51

souse

pickle
to plunge in liquid; immerse
to make drunk
something pickled
wetting
a habitual drunkard; also, a drinking spree; binge

52

spangle

small glittering object or particle
to set or sprinkle with or as if with spangles
to glitter as if covered with spangled; sparkle

53

spasmodic

relating to or resembling a spasm especially in sudden violence
acting or proceeding fitfully; intermittent

e.g. a spasmodic jerk
spasmodic attempts to lose weight

54

spoor

a track by which the progress of someone or something may be followed

55

spunk

spirit, courage, and determination

e.g. had the spunk to overcome a severe physical disability

56

spurn

to tread sharply or heavily upon; trample
to reject with disdain or contempt; scorn

e.g. Fiercely independent, the elderly couple spurned all offers of financial help.

57

star-crossed

not favored by the stars; ill-fated

58

stoop

to bend down or over
yield, submit
to descend from a superior rank, dignity, or status
debase, degrade

e.g. She stooped down to hug the child.
stooped to lying

59

stouthearted

courageous
stubborn

60

straggle

to move along slowly, typically in a small irregular group, so as to remain some distance behind the person or people in front
to grow, spread, or be laid out in an irregular, untidy way; trail
an untidy or irregularly arranged mass or group of something

e.g. The trees straggle over the countryside.
a straggle of cottages

61

stupendous

causing astonishment or wonder; awesome, marvelous
of amazing size or greatness; tremendous

e.g. a person with stupendous wealth
the stupendous engineering feats achieved by the ancient Romans

62

subscribe

sign
to pledge (a gift or contribution)
to assent to; support
to feel favorably disposed

e.g. unwilling to subscribe to the agreement
subscribe a large sum to the flood relief fund
I subscribe to your sentiments.

63

subsist

to have existence
persist, continue
to hold true

e.g. The author's right to royalties shall subsist for the term of the copyright.

64

substratum

an underlying support; foundation

e.g. drilled into the bedrock substratum

65

subvention

the provision of assistance or financial support

e.g. The committee receives an annual subvention from the foundation to run the museum.

66

sully

to make soiled or tarnished; defile

e.g. sully a reputation

67

sundry

miscellaneous, various
(all and sundry: everybody)

e.g. draw design inspirations from sundry cultures

68

superannuated

outmoded, old-fashioned
older than the typical member of a specified group

e.g. a periodical that insists on using largely superannuated terms like "editress" and "aviatrix"