Word List 27 Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Word List 27 Deck (102):
1

pedestrian

commonplace, unimaginative
going or performed on foot
of, relating to, or designed for walking

e.g. pedestrian concerns like paying the bills and getting the kids to school on time
a pedestrian mall

2

peeve

to make peevish or resentful; annoy
also

e.g She is constantly peeved by his habit of humming show tunes while she is trying to focus on her work.
My main peeve with the animal welfare organization is the endless stream of unsolicited trinkets in my mailbox.

3

peevish

querulous in temperament or mood; fretful
perversely obstinate
marked by ill temper

e.g. I would rather figure things out myself than ask that peevish librarian for help.

4

pejorative

a word or phrase that has negative connotations or that is intended to disparage or belittle
having negative connotations; especially, tending to disparage or belittle; depreciatory

e.g. The reviewer used the pejorative word "versifier" to refer to the writer, whose poems had struck a responsive chord with the general public.

5

pelf

money, riches

e.g. a politician who seems more interested in pelf than in policy

6

pell-mell

in mingled confusion or disorder
in confused state

e.g. papers strewn pell-mell on the desk
ran pell-mell for the door

7

pellucid

admitting maximum passage of light without diffusion or distortion
reflecting light evenly from all surfaces
easy to understand

e.g. the pellucid waters that lap upon that island's beaches
a pellucid simplicity

8

pen

to shut in or as if in a pen
a small enclosure for animals; the animals in such enclosure
a small place of confinement or storage
a female swan

e.g. a pen of sheep

9

penance

an act of self-abasement, mortification, or devotion performed to show sorrow or repentance for sin
something (as a hardship or penalty) resembling an act of penance (as in compensating for an offense)

e.g. He did charitable work as a penance.

10

penchant

a strong and continued inclination; broadly, liking

e.g. a penchant for sitting by the window and staring moodily off into space

11

peninsula

a portion of land nearly surrounded by water and connected with a larger body by an isthmus; also, a piece of land jutting out into the water whether with or without a well-defined isthmus

12

penitent

feeling or expressing humble or regretful pain or sorrow for sins or offense; repentant

e.g. a penitent gossip who had come to ask for forgiveness

13

pennant

any of various nautical flags tapering usually to a point or swallowtail and used for identification or signalling
a flag emblematic of championship (as in a professional baseball league); also, the championship itself

e.g. pennants waving atop the tower
The Red Sox won the American League pennant in 2004.

14

penultimate

next to last
of or relating to the next to the last syllable of a word

e.g. the penultimate syllable of the word
a penultimate accent

15

penury

a cramping and oppressive lack of resources; especially, severe poverty
extreme and often niggardly frugality

e.g. lived in a time when single women like herself faced a lifetime of genteel penury

16

perambulate

to travel over or through especially on foot; traverse
to make an official inspection of (a boundary) on food
stroll

e.g. We decided to lazily perambulate the entire length of the esplanade and enjoy the fresh air.
long summer evenings spent perambulating up and down the tree-lined streets of the quaint village

17

peregrinate

to travel especially on foot; walk
to walk or travel over; traverse

e.g. a celebrated novel about penniless free spirits peregrinating the United States
a couple of backpacking college students who decided to spend the summer peregrinating around Ireland

18

peremptory

putting an end to or precluding a right of action, debate, or delay; admitting of no contradiction
expressive of urgency or command
characterized by often imperious or arrogant self-assurance

e.g. a peremptory mandamus
a peremptory call
peremptory disregard of an objection
The governor's peremptory personal assistant began telling the crowd of reporters and photographers exactly where they had to stand.

19

preempt

to acquire by preemption
to seize upon to the exclusion of others; take for oneself
to replace with something considered to be of greater value or priority; take precedence over
to gain a commanding or preeminent place in
to prevent from happening; forestall, preclude

e.g. The movement was then preempted by a lunatic fringe.
The program did not appear, having been preempted by a baseball game.
The state law was preempted by a federal law.

20

perennial

present at all seasons of the year
persistent, enduring
continuing without interruption; constant, perpetual
regularly repeated or renewed; recurrent

e.g. This variety of oregano is perennial.
the perennial quest for certainty
Flooding is a perennial problem for people living by the river.

21

perfervid

marked by overwrought or exaggerated emotion; excessively fervent

e.g. the perfervid prose of a romance novel

22

perfidious

not able to be trusted; showing that someone cannot be trusted

e.g. A perfidious campaign worker revealed the senator's strategy to his leading rival for the nomination.

23

perfidy

the quality or state of being faithless or disloyal; treachery
an act or an instance of disloyalty

24

perforate

to make a hole through
to pass through or into by or as if by making a hole

e.g. He perforated the sheet with his pencil and put it in his binder.

25

perfunctory

characterized by routine or superficiality; mechanical
lacking in interest or enthusiasm

e.g. The violinist delivered a perfunctory performance that displayed none of the passion and warmth he was once known for.

26

peripatetic

pedestrian, itinerant
(pl.) movement or journeys hither and thither
of, relating to, or given to walking
moving or traveling from place to place; itinerant

e.g. She worked as a peripatetic journalist for most of her life.
a peripatetic career

27

peripheral

auxiliary, supplementary

e.g If we focus too much on peripheral issues, we will lose sight of the goal.

28

periscope

a tubular optical instrument containing lenses and mirrors by which an observer obtains an otherwise obstructed field of view

29

perjury

the voluntary violation of an oath or vow either by swearing to what is untrue or by omission to do what has been promised under oath; false swearing

30

depose

to remove from a throne or other high position
to put down; deposit
to testify to under oath or by affidavit; affirm, assert
to take a deposition of

e.g. A military junta deposed the dictator after he had bankrupted the country.
depose a witness
She was nervous when the time to depose before the jury finally arrived.

31

perky

briskly self-assured; cocky
jaunty

e.g. He hasn't been his perky self lately.
She drove around in a perky little.

32

permissive

granting or tending to grant permission; tolerant
deficient in firmness or control; indulgent, lax
allowing discretion; optional

e.g. Some states have more permissive laws than others.
reduced the permissive retirement age from 65 to 62

33

pernicious

highly injurious or destructive; deadly

e.g. the pernicious effects of jealousy

34

perpetual

continuing forever; everlasting
valid for all time
occurring continually; indefinitely long-continued

e.g. The region is in a state of perpetual war.

35

perpetuate

to make perpetual or cause to last indefinitely

e.g. Fears about an epidemic are being perpetuated by the media.

36

perquisite

a privilege, gain, or profit incidental to regular salary or wages
gratuity, tip

e.g. Use of the company's jet is a perquisite of the job.

37

persecute

to harass or punish in a manner designed to injure, grieve, or afflict
to annoy with persistent or urgent approaches (as attacks, pleas, or importunities); pester

e.g. The country's leaders relentlessly persecuted those who fought against the regime.

38

persiflage

frivolous bantering talk; light raillery/ridicule

e.g. Their tongue-in-cheek persiflage is sometimes mistaken for an exchange of insults by people who don't know them.

39

personable

pleasant or amiable in person; attractive

e.g. a personable hostess

40

perspicacious

of acute mental vision or discernment; keen

e.g. No matter how perspicacious one may be, one will never be able to decide on anything to his disadvantage.

41

perspicuous

plain to understanding especially because of clarity and precision of presentation

e.g. Believing that poetry need not be as perspicuous as prose, he writes poems that are intentionally ambiguous.

42

perspire

to emit matter through the skin; specifically, to secret and emit perspiration

e.g. I was nervous and could feel myself start to perspire.

43

pertain

to belong as a part
to be appropriate to something
to have reference

e.g. books pertaining to the country's history
the destruction pertaining to war
the belief that quality medical care is a right that pertains to everyone

44

pertinacious

adhering resolutely to an opinion, purpose, or design
perversely persistent
stubbornly tenacious

e.g. a pertinacious little boy who was determined to catch and collect reptiles
a pertinacious salesman who would simply not take "no" for an answer

45

pertinent

having a clear decisive relevance to the matter in hand

e.g. He impressed the jury with his concise, pertinent answers to the attorney's questions.

46

immaterial

not consisting of matter; incorporeal
of no substantial consequence; unimportant

e.g. The fact that she is a woman is immaterial and irrelevant.

47

peruse

to examine or consider with attention and in detail; study
to look over or through in a casual or cursory manner

e.g. He perused the newspaper over breakfast.
perused the manuscript, checking for grammatical errors

48

pervade

to become diffused throughout every part of

e.g. A feeling of great sadness pervades the film.
Art and music pervade every aspect of their lives.

49

pervious

accessible
permeable

e.g. pervious to reason
The new road has a pervious surface that will cut down on the amount of water that collects on it during heavy rains.

50

pester

to harass with petty irritations; annoy

e.g. One resident pestered the condo board about every little thing.

51

pestilent

destructive of life; deadly
injuring or endangering society; pernicious
causing displeasure or annoyance
infectious, contagious

e.g. Proper hand washing will help prevent the spread of most pestilent diseases.
pestilent reporters hounding him night and day

52

pestle

a usually club-shaped implement for pounding or grinding substances in a mortar

53

petrify

to make rigid or inert like stone
to make lifeless or inactive; deaden
to confound with fear, amazement, or awe

e.g. slogans apt to petrify a man's thinking
a novel about an airline pilot that will petrify

54

petrology

a science that deals with the origin, history, occurrence, structure, chemical composition, and classification of rocks

55

petroglyph

a carving or inscription on a rock

56

petulant

insolent or rude in speech or behavior
characterized by temporary or capricious ill humor; peevish

e.g. a petulant and fussy man who is always blaming everyone else for his problems

57

philanthropic

of, relating to, or characterized by philanthropy; humanitarian
dispensing or receiving aid from funds set aside for humanitarian purposes

e.g. a philanthropic society that has been doing good for over a century

58

philately

the collection and study of postage and imprinted stamps; stamp collecting

59

phlegmatic

having or showing a slow and stolid temperament

e.g. a strangely phlegmatic response response to what should have been happy news

60

piano

at a soft volume; soft

61

pictorial

of or relating to a painter, a painting, or the painting or drawing of pictures
illustrated by pictures
suggesting or conveying visual images

e.g. a pictorial record of the trip
pictorial perspective
pictorial poetry

62

piddling

trivial, paltry

e.g. a piddling amount of money
He raised one final, piddling objection to the plan.

63

pied

of two or more colors in blotches; also, wearing or having in parti-colored coat

e.g. a pied horse

64

pilgrim

one who journeys in foreign lands; wayfarer
one who travels to a shrine or holy place as a devotee

e.g. Thousands of Muslim pilgrims traveled to Mecca.

65

pillar

a firm upright support for a superstructure; post
a supporting, integral, or upstanding member or part
a fundamental precept

e.g. The ancient Greek temple boasted graceful marble pillars with richly ornamented tops.
My father has been my pillar throughout this crisis.
the five pillars of Islam

66

pillory

a device formerly used for publicly punishing offender consisting of a wooden frame with holes in which the head and hands can be locked
a means for exposing one to public scorn
to set in a pillory as a punishment
to expose to public contempt, ridicule, or scorn

e.g. The press pilloried the judge for her decision.

67

pine

to lose vigor, health, or flesh (as through grief); languish
to yearn intensely and persistently especially for something unattainable

e.g. Steve pines for Bucky and Bucky pines for Steve.

68

pinnacle

a high mountain top; the tower on the roof or building that comes to a narrow point at the top
the highest point of development

e.g. a singer who has reached the pinnacle of success

69

pious

marked by or showing reverence for deity and devotion to divine worship
showing loyal reverence for a person or thing; dutiful

70

piquant

engagingly provocative; also, having a lively arch charm
agreeably stimulating to the palate; especially, spicy

e.g. piquant vegetables seasoned with pepper
a piquant bit of gossip

71

pique

a transient feeling of wounded vanity; resentment
to arouse anger of resentment in; irritate
to excite or arouse
pride

e.g. He slammed the door in a fit of pique.
Her seat companion piqued her by repeatedly poking her in the ribs.
Brightly colored objects pique a baby's interest.
He piques himself on his skill as a cook.

72

pirouette

a rapid whirling about of the body; also, a full turn on the toe or ball of one foot in ballet
also

73

pitfall

trap, snare; specifically, a pit flimsily covered or camouflaged and used to capture and hold animals or men
a hidden or not easily recognized danger or difficulty

e.g. He had dug a pitfall for unwary feet, and the great opportunist fell therein.

74

pith

the soft or spongy tissue in the stems of plants
the essential part; core
substantial quality (as of meaning)
importance

e.g. the pith of the discussion

75

pithy

consisting of or abounding in pith
having substance and point; tersely cogent

e.g. He captured the whole speech in one pithy sentence.
a pithy little Mother's Day card

76

prolix

unduly prolonged or drawn out; too long
marked by or using an excess of words

e.g. a person known for habitually transforming brief anecdotes into prolix sagas that exhaust their listeners

77

pitiful

deserving or around pity or commiseration
exciting pitying contempt (as by meanness or inadequacy)

e.g. She made a pitiful attempt to complete her work.
pitiful wages

78

pittance

a small portion, amount, or allowance; also, a meager wage or remuneration

e.g. The internship offers only a pittance for a salary, but it is great opportunity to gain experience.

79

placate

to soothe or mollify especially by concessions; appease

e.g. The administration placated protesters by agreeing to consider their demands.

80

placid

serenely free of interruption or disturbance
complacent

e.g. placid skies
a person with a sunny, placid disposition

81

plage

the beach of a seaside resort
a bright region on the sun cause by the light emitted by clouds of calcium or hydrogen and often associated with a sunspot

82

plagiotropic

having the longer axis inclined away from the vertical

83

plague

a disastrous evil or affliction; calamity
an epidemic disease causing a high rate of mortality; pestilence
a cause of irritation; nuisance
a sudden unwelcome outbreak
also

e.g. The country was hit by a plague of natural disasters that year.
Computer viruses plague internet users.
Crime plagues inner city.

84

plaintiff

a person who brings a legal action

e.g. The judge ruled that the plaintiff's lawsuit was groundless and dismissed it.

85

plaint

lamentation, wail
protest, complaint

e.g. The after the massacre, the plaints of bereaved mothers and wives could be heard throughout the village.
That taxes are too high is perhaps the most perennial of plaints.

86

plaintive

expressive of suffering a woe; melancholy

e.g. We could hear the plaintive cry of a wounded animal in the woods.
The puppy's plaintive expression after we put the toy away was rather amusing.

87

plait

a fold in cloth; pleat
a braid of material (as hair or straw); especially, pigtail
also

e.g. She wore a plait down her back that reached her waist.
how to plait my own hair
plait a basket

88

plane

to make smooth or oven; level
to remove by or as if by planing (oft. used with away or off)
a tool for smoothing or shaping a wood surface

89

plangent

having a loud reverberating sound
having an expressive and especially plaintive quality

e.g. a plangent roar
a plangent, haunting song about a long-ago love

90

plankton

the passively floating or weakly swimming usually minute animal and plant life of a body of water

91

plaster

a medicated or protective dressing that consists of a film (as of cloth or plastic) spread with a usually medicated substance; broadly, something applied to heal and soothe
a pasty composition that hardens on drying and is used for coating walls, ceilings, and partitions
also
to smooth down with a sticky or shiny substance
to affix to especially conspicuously or in quantity

e.g. Put a plaster on the burn and don't touch it.
We plastered and sanded the walls before painting them.
They plastered the walls with posters.

92

plateau

a usually extensive land area having a relatively level surface; tableland
a relatively stable level, period, or condition

e.g. a plateau covering hundreds of miles
The price of gas seems to have reached a plateau.

93

platitude

the quality or state of being dull and insipid
a banal, trite, or stale remark

e.g. His speech was filled with familiar platitudes about the value of hard work and dedication.

94

platonic

relating to or based on platonic love; also, experiencing or professing platonic love
of, relating to, or being a relationship marked by the absence of romance or sex
confined to words, theories, or ideals, and not leading to practical action

e.g. They had a platonic friendship, not a romantic one.
He wants his audience to wake up from their sleep, emerge from their platonic cave, and see the world as it truly is.

95

plaudit

an act or round of applause
enthusiastic approval (oft. pl.)

e.g. received many plaudits for her academic achievements

96

plead

to argue a case or cause in a court of law
to make an allegation in an action
to make a plea of a specified nature
to argue for or against a claim
to entreat or appeal earnestly

e.g. He begged and pleaded, but she would not change her mind.
She couldn't afford a lawyer to plead her case.

97

pleat

fold; especially, to arrange in pleats
a fold in cloth made by doubling material over on itself; also, something resembling such a fold

e.g. pleat a skirt
Her skirts has pleats at the waist.

98

pledge

a serious promise or agreement
a promise to give money
something left with another person as security for the performance of an act
to make a pledge of; especially, pawn
to drink to the health of
to bind by a pledge

e.g. He has promised to fulfill a campaign pledge to cut taxes.
Her family pledged $100000 toward the construction of a new school.

99

plenitude

the quality or state of being full; completeness
a great sufficiency; abundance

e.g. a plenitude of information on the topic
a plenitude of natural beauty

100

plenteous

fruitful, productive
constituting or existing in plenty

e.g. a plenteous harvest
The seasons had been plenteous in corn.
a plenteous supply of napkins

101

pliable

supple enough to bend freely or repeatedly without breaking
yielding readily to others; complaisant
adjustable to varying conditions

e.g. The leather is pliant, so it's easy to work with.
She sometimes takes advantage of her pliable parents.

102

pliant

yielding readily to others; pliable, complaisant
easily influenced; yielding
suitable for varied uses

e.g a pliant Congress that will do whatever the President wants
A pliant branch bent low with the weight of ripe fruit.