Word List 29 Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Word List 29 Deck (102):
1

privation

an act or instance of depriving; deprivation
the state or being deprived; especially, lack of what is needed for existence

e.g. The country has suffered through long periods of economic privation.
The constant privation of sleep was starting to affect my work.

2

probity

adherence to the highest principles and ideals; uprightness

e.g. The defense attorney questioned the probity of the witness.

3

turpitude

inherent baseness; depravity

e.g. Pictorial advertisements for chic clothing and fragrances in which drug addition and other forms of moral turpitude are depicted as alternative fashion statements.

4

scrupulous

having moral integrity; acting in strict regard for what is considered right or proper
punctiliously exact; painstaking

e.g. Less scrupulous companies find ways to evade the law.
scrupulous attention to detail

5

proboscis

the trunk of an elephant
the human nose especially when prominent
any of various elongated or extensible tubular processes (as the sucking organ of a butterfly) of the oral region

e.g. If there were a direct relation between mendacity and the length of one's proboscis, hers would be a mile long.

6

proceeds

the total amount brought in
the net amount received after deduction of any discount of charges

e.g. All proceeds from the special promotion will go to charity.

7

procession

a group of individuals moving along in an orderly often ceremonial way
succession, sequence
continuous forward movement; progression
emanation

e.g. a procession of children carrying candles
The cars moved in procession to the cemetery.

8

proctor

supervisor, monitor; especially, one appointed to supervise students (as at an exam)

9

procure

to get possession of; obtain by particular care and effort
bring about, achieve

e.g. She managed to procure a ticket to the concert.
procured the prisoner's release

10

prod

to thrust a pointed instrument into; prick
to incite to action; stir
to poke or stir as if with a prod

e.g. She prodded him in the ribs to get attention.
She was prodded into joining the team.

11

prodigal

characterized by profuse or wasteful expenditure; lavish
recklessly spendthrift
yielding abundantly; luxuriant

e.g. a prodigal feast
the prodigal prince

12

prodigious

exciting amazement or wonder
extraordinary in bulk, quantity, or degree; enormous

e.g. stage magicians performing prodigious feats for rapt audiences
a prodigious supply of canned food kept in the basement for emergencies

13

prodigy

a portentous event; omen
something extraordinary or inexplicable
a highly talented child or youth

e.g. a new drug that is being hailed as the latest prodigy of the medical world

14

profane

to treat (something sacred) with abuse, irreverence, or contempt; desecrate
to debase by a wrong, unworthy, or vulgar use

e.g. The once-lovely landscape had been profaned by ugly factories.
profaned his considerable acting talents by appearing in some wretched movies

15

proffer

to present for acceptance; tender, offer

e.g. He proffered advice on how best to proceed.
proffered his assistance in helping reach a compromise

16

proficient

well advanced in an art, occupation, or branch of knowledge

e.g. proficient in computer programming

17

profiteer

one who makes what is considered an unreasonable profit especially on the sale of essential goods during times of emergency

18

profligate

wildly extravagant
completely given up to dissipation and licentiousness

e.g. very profligate in spending
profligate movie producers hoping to create the next blockbuster
leading a profligate life

19

profundity

- profound

e.g. Her books are a mixture of playfulness and profundity.
the depth and profundity of her thoughts

20

profuse

pouring forth liberally; extravagant
exhibiting great abundance; bountiful

e.g. He offered profuse apologies for being late.
profuse in their thanks
a profuse harvest

21

progeny

descendants, children; offspring
outcome, product
a body of followers, disciples, or successors

e.g. Many Americans are the progeny of immigrants.
Their work is the progeny of many earlier works.

22

prognosis

the prospect of recovery as anticipated from the usual course of disease or peculiarities of the case
forecast, prognostication

e.g. The president had a hopeful prognosis about the company's future.

23

proliferate

to grow by rapid production of new parts, cells, buds, or offspring
to increase in number as if by proliferating; multiply

e.g. Rumors about the incident proliferated on the internet.

24

prolific

producing young or fruit especially freely; fruitful
marked by abundant inventiveness or productivity

e.g. Tony Stark is a famously prolific engineer.
a prolific author who could produce several works of fiction and nonfiction a year

25

prolix

unduly prolonged or drawn out; too long
marked by or using an excess of words

e.g. a person known for habitually transforming brief anecdotes into prolix sagas that exhaust their listeners

26

promenade

to take or go on a promenade
to perform a promenade in a dance
a place for strolling
a leisurely walk or ride especially in a public place for pleasure or display

e.g. They promenaded along the beach.
a beautifully landscaped park with a wide promenade along the riverside

27

promulgate

to make (as a doctrine) known by open declaration; proclaim
to make known or public the terms of (a proposed law)
to put (a law) into action or force

e.g. Her ideas have been widely promulgated on the internet.
The law was promulgated in April 1988.

28

prone

having a tendency or inclination being likely
having the front or ventral surface downward; lying flat or prostrate

e.g. prone to emotional outbursts under stress
quickly subdue the suspect and get him into a prone position

29

prop

something that props or sustains; support
to support by placing something under or against (oft. used with up)
to sustain, strength (oft. used with up)

e.g. She propped the rake against a tree.
a government propped up by the military

30

propagate

to cause to continue or increase
to cause to spread out and affect a greater number or greater area; extend
to foster growing knowledge of, familiarity with, or acceptance of (as an idea or belief); publicize

e.g. new ways to propagate plants without seeds
A new poetry flourished to develop and propagate the new ideal.
Sound cannot propagate in vacuum.

31

propensity

an often intense natural inclination or preference

e.g. a propensity for crime

32

prophetic

- prophet, prophecy

e.g. In retrospect, those lower-than-expected sales numbers were a prophetic indicator of the financial trouble the company would soon be in.

33

propitiate

to gain or regain the favor or goodwill of; appease

e.g. an offering to propitiate the angry gods

34

propitious

favorably disposed; benevolent
being a good omen; auspicious
tending to favor; advantageous

e.g. Now is a propitious time to start a business.
The success of CA:CW in May was a propitious start for the summer season of Marvel blockbusters.

35

proposition

proposal
the point to be discussed or maintained in argument

e.g. an attractive business proposition
Her theory rejects the basic proposition that humans evolved from monkeys.

36

proprietary

one that possesses exclusive right to something; specifically, proprietor
of, relating to, or characteristic of an owner of title holder
used, made, or marketed by one having the exclusive legal right
privately owned and managed and run as a profit-making organization

e.g. The investors have a proprietary interest in the land.
The computer comes with the manufacturer's proprietary software.
"Merriam-Webster" is a proprietary name.
a proprietary clinic

37

propriety

the quality or state or being proper or suitable; appropriateness
conformity to what is socially acceptable

e.g. They debated the propriety of the punishment that he was given.
certain proprieties while attending a wedding

38

prosaic

characteristic of prose as distinguished from poetry; factual
dull, unimaginative
everyday, ordinary

e.g. prosaic advice
heroic characters wasted in prosaic lives

39

proscribe

to condemn or forbid as harmful or unlawful; prohibit

e.g. acts proscribed by law
Regulations proscribe the use of electronic devices on board a plane while it is landing.

40

prosecute

to follow to the end; pursue until finished
to engage in; perform
to bring legal action against for redress or punishment of a crime or violation of law
to institute legal proceedings with reference to

e.g. She criticized the government for the way it has prosecuted the war.
The store's owner agreed not to prosecute if the boy returned the stolen goods.
The case is being prosecuted by the assistant district attorney.

41

prosecution

- prosecute

e.g. There has been an increase in prosecutions for gun-related crimes.
The defendant is awaiting prosecution.
The prosecution called their first witness.

42

proselytize

to induce someone to convert to one's faith
to recruit someone to join one's party, institution, or cause

e.g. He uses his position to proselytize for the causes that he supports.
The efforts of early missionaries to proselytize the Native Americans of Minnesota were largely unproductive.

43

prospect

an extensive view; a mental consideration; survey
the act of looking forward; anticipation
a mental picture of something to come; vision
to explore an area especially for mineral deposits
explore

e.g. the frightening prospect of going to war
Bankruptcy is an unlikely prospect for the company.
Soon all manner of people had arrived in the valley to prospect it for gold.

44

prostrate

stretched out with face on the ground in adoration or submission; also, lying flat
completely overcome and lacking vitality, will, or power to rise
trailing on the ground; procumbent (of a plant or stem)
to throw or put into a prostrate position
to reduce to submission, helplessness, or exhaustion

e.g. The police found the body in a prostrate position.
a country left prostrate by natural disasters
prostrate shrubs
They prostrated before the throne, asking for forgiveness.
an athlete prostrated for weeks by a bout of pneumonia

45

protean

having a varied nature or able to assume different forms
displaying great diversity or variety; versatile

e.g. a protean actor who is equally comfortable with light comedy and serious drama

46

prototype

an original model on which something is patterned; archetype
an individual that exhibits the essential features or a later type
a standard or typical example

e.g. a prototype of the new car
the prototype of a conservative businessman

47

protract

to prolong in time or space; continue
to extend forward or outward

e.g. The highway project was protracted by years of litigation.

48

protuberant

thrusting out from a surrounding or adjacent surface often as a rounded mass; prominent

e.g. protuberant eyes

49

provenance

origin, source
the history of ownership of a valued object or work of art or literature

e.g. The artifact is of unknown provenance.
the provenances of these paintings

50

provender

dry food for domestic animals; feed
food, victuals

e.g. a chef who prides himself on creating all of his dishes from local provender

51

provident

making provision for the future; prudent
frugal, saving

e.g. be provident without being miserly
Her provident measures kept us safe while we waited out the hurricane.

52

providential

happening at a good time because of luck
opportune, fortunate, lucky

e.g. He attended financially to all his children and saw to it that they had providential opportunities.

53

provincial

of, relating to, or coming from a province
limited in outlook; narrow
lacking the polish of urban society; unsophisticated

e.g. a provincial accent
an artist who has been criticized for being provincial and old-fashioned

54

provision

the ace or process of providing
the fact or state of being prepared
a measure taken beforehand to deal with a need or contingency; preparation

e.g. He made provisions to donate part of his fortune to charity after he died.
make provision for emergencies

55

provisional

serving for the time being; temporary

e.g. The government has given provisional approval for the use of the new drug.

56

provisory

containing or subject to a proviso; conditional
provisional

e.g. a provisory permit to block off the street while movie scenes were being shot
a provisory legal adviser who will be replaced by a court-appointed public defender

57

prowess

distinguished bravery; especially, military valor and skill
extraordinary ability

e.g. Captain America's military prowess

58

prowl

to move about or wander stealthily in or as if in search prey

e.g. a tiger prowling in the jungle
The police were prowling the streets in their patrol cars.

59

proximate

immediately preceding or following
very near; close
soon forthcoming; imminent

e.g. the proximate cause of the fire
the proximate publication of his novel

60

prudent

marked by wisdom or judiciousness
shrewd in the management of practical affairs
marked by circumspection; discreet
provident, frugal

e.g. prudent advice
prudent investors

61

prudish

- prude; priggish

e.g. By the prudish standards of 19th century, any depiction of the nude was scandalous.

62

prune

a plum dried or capable of drying without fermentation
to reduce especially by eliminating superficial matter
to remove as superfluous

e.g. prune the branches/trees
pruned the text/budget
prune away all ornamentation

63

pry

to look closely or inquisitively; also, to make a nosy or presumptuous inquiry
to raise, move, or pull apart with a lever; prize
to extract, detach, or open with difficulty

e.g. pried the secret out of my sister

64

psyche

soul, personality
mind

e.g. disturbing, enigmatic paintings that seem to embody the psyche of this brilliant but troubled artist

65

pucker

to become wrinkled or constricted
a fold or wrinkle in a normally even surface

e.g. His skin puckered a little around the scar.

66

puckish

impish, whimsical

e.g. a puckish smile on his face
He takes a puckish delight in teasing her about her love life, or lack thereof.

67

puerile

juvenile
childish, silly

e.g. He told the teenagers that such puerile behavior would not be tolerated during the ceremony.
allowed the company to be taken over by a bunch of puerile whippersnappers fresh out of business school

68

pugilism

boxing

69

pugilist

fighter; especially, a professional boxer

70

pugnacious

having a quarrelsome or combative nature; truculent

e.g. a movie reviewer who is spirited, even pugnacious, when defending her opinions

71

puissance

strength, power

e.g. The president pledged to put the full puissance of the nation into the war effort.

72

puissant

- puissance

e.g. one of the nation's most respected and puissant advocates for the rights of minorities

73

pulchritude

physical comeliness

74

pullet

a young hen

75

pulley

a wheel or set of wheels that is used with a rope, chain, etc., to lift or lower heavy objects

76

pulverize

to reduce to very small particles; atomize
annihilate, demolish

e.g. The mower pulverizes grass clippings.

77

punctilious

marked by or concerned about precise accordance with the details of codes or conventions

e.g. punctilious about grammar
old-money aristocrats with a punctilious sense of propriety

78

pundit

a learned man; teacher
a person who gives opinions in an authoritative manner usually through the mass media; critic

e.g. The new mini laptop has gotten a thumbs-up from industry pundits.

79

puny

slight or inferior in power, size, or importance; weak

e.g. I wouldn't mess with Bucky's boyfriend - he makes many bodybuilders look puny in comparison.
their puny attempt to trick us

80

purchase

an advantage (as a firm hold or position) used in applying one's power

e.g. clutching the steering wheel for more purchase

81

purgative

purging or tending to purge
a purging medicine; cathartic

82

purgatory

a place or state of temporary suffering or suffering

e.g. the purgatory of drug abuse
The marathons were jokingly referred to as one-day purgatory.

83

purlieu

(pl.) environs, neighborhood
a frequently visited place; haunt
(pl.) confines, bounds

e.g. The restaurant, the preferred purlieu of the theatergoing crowd, is always packed an hour or two before showtime.
We stopped at one of the several pubs in the purlieus of the stadium.

84

purloin

to appropriate wrongfully and often by a breach of trust

e.g. The studio stepped up security, fearing that someone might attempt to purloin a copy of the script for the show's season finale.

85

purported

reputed, alleged

e.g. the purported value of the estate

86

purvey

to supply (as provisions) usually as a matter of business
to be busy with trifles; peddle

e.g. a shop purveying handmade merchandise

87

pusillanimous

lacking courage and resolution; marked by contemptible timidity

e.g. pusillanimous politicians who vote according to whichever way the political wind is blowing

88

pylon

a massive gateway
any of various towerlike structures
traffic cone

e.g. The bridge is supported by concrete pylons.
a row of electricity pylons

89

pyre

a combustible heap for burning a dead body as a funeral rite; broadly, a pile of material to be burned

90

quack

charlatan
a pretender to medical skill
also

e.g. quack cancer cures

91

quaff

to drink deeply

e.g. We stopped at a bar and quaffed a few beers.

92

quail

a kind of small wild bird
to give way; falter
to recoil in dread or terror; cower

e.g. His courage never quailed.
Even the strongest quail before financial ruin.

93

quaint

marked by skillful design
marked by beauty or elegance
unusual or different in character or appearance; odd
pleasingly or strikingly old-fashioned or unfamiliar

e.g. a quaint fishing village
quaint customs of the natives

94

qualm

a sudden attack of illness, faintness, or nausea
a sudden access of usually disturbing emotion (as doubt or fear)
a feeling of uneasiness about a point especially of conscience or propriety

e.g. He accepted their offer without a qualm.
Laura has no qualms about downloading pirated music file from the internet.

95

quandary

a state of perplexity or doubt

e.g. The unexpected results of the test have created a quandary for researchers.
I'm in a quandary about ....

96

quarry

one that is sought or pursued; prey
an open excavation usually for obtaining building stone, slate, or limestone
a rich source

97

quash

to suppress or extinguish summarily and completely
to nullify especially by judicial action

e.g. quash a rebellion
quash an indictment

98

quaver

tremble
trill
to utter sound in tremulous tones
also

e.g. Her voice quavered during the speech.
speak in quavering tones
a quaver in his voice

99

quay

a structure build parallel to the bank of a waterway for use as a landing place

e.g. docked the ferry at the quay to let the passengers off

100

quell

to thoroughly overwhelm and reduce to submission or passivity
quiet, pacify

e.g. quell a riot
quell the student/fear

101

quench

put out, extinguish
to relieve or satisfy

e.g. quench the glowing coals with water
quenched the warmth he is showing toward you
quench the desire to read the book
quench a rebellion

102

querulous

habitually complaining
fretful, whining

e.g. car trips that were frequently spoiled by a couple of querulous passengers in the back