Word List 7 Flashcards Preview

GRE Vocabulary > Word List 7 > Flashcards

Flashcards in Word List 7 Deck (102):
1

somatic

of, relating to, or affecting the body especially distinguished from the germplasm or the psyche
of or relating to the wall of the body; parietal

e.g. a somatic disorder that was once thought to be "all in patient's head"

2

somatic

of, relating to, or affecting the body especially distinguished from the germplasm or the psyche
of or relating to the wall of the body; parietal

e.g. a somatic disorder that was once thought to be "all in patient's head"

3

chronic

marked by long duration or frequent recurrence

e.g. chronic experiments
chronic petty warfare

4

chrysanthemum

a plant that has brightly colored flowers and that is often grown in gardens; also the flower of this plant

5

churlish

of, resembling, or characteristic of a churl; vulgar
marked by a lack of civility of graciousness; surly
difficult to work with or deal with; intractable

e.g. It would be churlish for any diner guest to express anything but gratitude for the host's generous hospitality.
churlish soil

6

chortle

to sing or chant exultantly
to laugh or chuckle especially in satisfaction or exultation

e.g. Audiences might chortle gently during the movie's amusing bits, but there are few knee-slappers.

7

complaisance

disposition to please or comply; affability

e.g. The complaisance of his girlfriend is such that she meekly goes along with everything he says.

8

cinder

the slag from a metal furnace; dross
a partly burned combustible in which fire in extinct

e.g. Cinders from the campfire floated through the air.

9

cipher

zero; one that has no weight, worth, or influence; nonentity
a method of transforming a text in order to conceal its meaning; a message in code

e.g. She was nothing more than a cipher.

10

circuitous

having a circular or winding course
not being forthright or direct in language or action

e.g. a circuitous explanation
Their logic seems a bit circuitous.

11

circumlocution

the use of an unnecessarily large number of words to express an idea
evasion in speech

12

loquacious

full of excessive talk; wordy
given to fluent or excessive talk; garrulous

e.g. a loquacious and glib politician

13

chronic

marked by long duration or frequent recurrence

e.g. chronic experiments
chronic petty warfare

14

chrysanthemum

a plant that has brightly colored flowers and that is often grown in gardens; also the flower of this plant

15

churlish

of, resembling, or characteristic of a churl; vulgar
marked by a lack of civility of graciousness; surly
difficult to work with or deal with; intractable

e.g. It would be churlish for any diner guest to express anything but gratitude for the host's generous hospitality.
churlish soil

16

chortle

to sing or chant exultantly
to laugh or chuckle especially in satisfaction or exultation

e.g. Audiences might chortle gently during the movie's amusing bits, but there are few knee-slappers.

17

cistern

an artificial reservoir (as an underground tank) or storing liquids and especially water

18

cinder

the slag from a metal furnace; dross
a partly burned combustible in which fire in extinct

e.g. Cinders from the campfire floated through the air.

19

cipher

zero; one that has no weight, worth, or influence; nonentity
a method of transforming a text in order to conceal its meaning; a message in code

e.g. She was nothing more than a cipher.

20

circuitous

having a circular or winding course
not being forthright or direct in language or action

e.g. a circuitous explanation
Their logic seems a bit circuitous.

21

circumference

the perimeter of a circle
the external boundary of surface of a figure or object; periphery

22

circumlocution

the use of an unnecessarily large number of words to express an idea
evasion in speech

23

circumscribe

to constrict the range or activity of definitely and clearly

e.g. fields circumscribed by tall trees
He circumscribed his enthusiasm so as not to make the losing side feel worse.

24

prescribe

to lay down a rule; dictate
to write or give medical prescriptions

e.g. a drug commonly prescribed to treat ashes
The people have no other rule of conduct, than what their priests are pleased to prescribe.

25

circumstantial

belonging to, consisting in, or dependent on circumstances
pertinent but not essential; incidental
marked by careful attention to details; abounding in factual details

e.g. circumstantial evidence
a circumstantial account of the meeting

26

circumvent

to hem in; to make a circuit around
to manage to get around especially ingenuity or stratagem

e.g. We circumvented the problem by using a different program.

27

cistern

an artificial reservoir (as an underground tank) or storing liquids and especially water

28

clairvoyance

keen perception or insight

29

clam

a freshwater mussel
a stolid or closemouthed person

30

clamor

noisy shouting; a loud continuous noise
insistent public expression (as of support or protest)

e.g. a public clamor for an arrest in the case

31

clipper

one that clips something; an implement for clipping especially hair or nails
one that moves swiftly; a fast sailing ship

32

clannish

of or relating to a clan
tending to associate only with a select group of similar background or status

e.g. The college faculty can be pretty clannish, so it's difficult to be an outsider here.

33

roil

to make turbid by stirring up the sediments or dregs of; to stir up, disturb, disorder
to make agitated and angry; rile, upset
to move turbulently

e.g. Financial markets have been roiled by the banking crisis.
The waters of the gulf tossed and roiled as the hurricane surged toward the shore.

34

obfuscate

darken; to make obscure
confuse

e.g. Their explanations only serve to obfuscate and confuse.

35

clasp

a device for holding together objects or parts of something
a strong hold with your hands or arms
to fasten (something) with a clasp
to hold tightly with your hands or arms

36

clout

a blow especially with the hand; also a hard hit in baseball
pull, influence

e.g. She used her political cloud to have another school built.
She gave the stubborn handle a solid clout to make it turn.

37

clause

a part of a sentence that has its own subject and verb
a separate part of a legal document; a stipulation in a document

38

cleft

a space or opening made by or as if by splitting; fissure
a usually V-shaped indented formation; a hollow between ridges or protuberances

39

clement

inclined to be merciful; lenient
mild

e.g. a clement judge
clement weather for this time of year

40

cloy

- cloying

e.g. A diet of cake and candy soon cloys.
The readers, therefore, will not suppose that we intend (supposing that we were able) to cloy them with sweets.

41

cloister

a monastic establishment

42

closet

closely private
being so in private

e.g. a closet racist

43

cloture

the closing or limitation of debate in legislative body especially by calling for a vote

44

cloudburst

a sudden, very heavy rain

45

clout

a blow especially with the hand; also a hard hit in baseball
pull, influence

e.g. She used her political cloud to have another school built.
She gave the stubborn handle a solid clout to make it turn.

46

impuissance

weakness, powerlessness

47

colt

a young horse; especially a male foal
a young untried person

e.g. a colt who looked to the team's more experienced players for advice

48

cloying

disgusting or distasteful by reason of excess
excessively sweet or sentimental

e.g. After a while, the softness of his voice becomes cloying.
a cloying romantic comedy

49

cloy

- cloying

e.g. A diet of cake and candy soon cloys.
The readers, therefore, will not suppose that we intend (supposing that we were able) to cloy them with sweets.

50

cobble

repair, make
to make or put together roughly or hastily

e.g. cobble shoes
cobble together an agreement

51

coalition

- coalesce; combination

e.g. The group is working in coalition with other environmental groups.
A multiparty coalition ruled the country.

52

coarse

of ordinary or inferior quality or value; common
loose or rough in texture
not precise or detailed with respect to adjustment or discrimination
crude or unrefined in taste, manners, or language
harsh, raucous, or rough in tone

53

coddle

to cook (as eggs) in liquid slowly and gently just below the boiling point
to treat with extreme or excessive care or kindness; pamper

e.g. The judges were accused of coddling criminals.

54

coax

to influence or gently urge by caressing or flattering; wheedle
to draw, gain, or persuade by means of gentle urging or flattering
to manipulate with great perseverance and usually with considerable effort toward a desired state or activity

e.g. coax him into going
unable to coax an answer out of him
coax a fire to burn

55

fastidious

having high and often capricious standards; difficult to please
reflecting a meticulous, sensitive, or demanding attitude
having complex nutritional requirements

e.g. critics so fastidious that they can talk only to a small circle of initiates
fastidious workmanship
fastidious microbes

56

hoax

to trick into believing or accepting as genuine something false and often preposterous

e.g. a skilled forger who hoaxed the art world into believing that the paintings were long-lost Vermeers

57

cob

a male swan
corncob

58

cobbler

a person who makes or repairs shoes
a dessert made of cooked fruit covered in a thick crust

59

cobble

repair, make
to make or put together roughly or hastily

e.g. cobble shoes
cobble together an agreement

60

lampoon

satire

e.g. Trump said such ridiculous things that he was often the target of lampoons in the press.

61

coda

final passage of a piece of music

62

coddle

to cook (as eggs) in liquid slowly and gently just below the boiling point
to treat with extreme or excessive care or kindness; pamper

e.g. The judges were accused of coddling criminals.

63

codify

to reduce to a code
systematize; classify

e.g. The convention codified the rules of war.
The author tries to codify important ideas about language.

64

coerce

to restrain or dominate by force
to compel to an act or choice
to achieve by force or threat

e.g. Religion in the past has tried to coerce the irreligious.
coerced into agreeing
coerce compliance

65

coercion

- coerce

e.g. A promise obtained by coercion is never binding.

66

coeval

of the same or equal age, antiquity, or duration

e.g. two stars thought to be coeval because they have nearly the same mass and brightness

67

cogent

having power to compel or constrain
appealing forcibly to the mind or reason
pertinent, relevant

e.g. cogent forces
The results of the DNA fingerprinting were the most cogent evidence for acquittal.

68

cogitate

to ponder or meditate on usually intently

e.g. cogitate about chances of failing
By the time he finishes cogitating what to do with his life, it will be almost over.

69

cognizance

a distinguishing mark or emblem
knowledge, awareness; notice, acknowledgement
jurisdiction, responsibility

e.g. They had no cognizance of the situation.
take cognizance of their achievement

70

colonnade

a series of columns supporting a roof structure

71

colander

a perforated pan

72

lapse

a slight error typically due to forgetfulness or inattention; a becoming less, decline
interruption, discontinuance
a passage of time; interval
also

e.g. a lapse in table manner
a lapse from grace/ into bad habits
He returned to college after a lapse of several years.
After a few polite exchanges, the conversation lapsed.

73

collate

to compare critically; also and in order to verify, often to integrate or arrange in order
to assemble in proper order, especially for binding

e.g. collate the data
collate the pages of the report

74

collateral

accompanying as secondary or subordinate; concomitant, ancillary
property (as securities) pledged by a borrower to protect the interests of the lender

e.g. digress into collateral matters

75

collected

gathered together
possessed of calmness and composure often through concentrated effort

76

colloquial

conversational

77

comity

friendly social atmosphere; social harmony
a loose widespread community based on common social institutions

e.g. group activities promoting comity

78

collude

conspire, plot

e.g. accused of colluding to keep the prices high

79

colonnade

a series of columns supporting a roof structure

80

variegate

to diversify in external appearance especially with different colors; dapple
to enliven or give interest to by means of variety

81

colossal

of a bulk, extent, power, or effect approaching or suggesting the stupendous or incredible
of an exceptional or astonishing degree

e.g. a colossal failure

82

colossus

a statue of gigantic size and proportions
a person or thing of immense size or power

83

coltish

not subjected to discipline; frisky, playful
of, relating to, or resembling a colt

e.g. Off camera the actor is high-spiritedly coltish, but turns serious once the camera starts rolling.

84

comatose

unconscious, torpid

85

comely

pleasurably conforming to notions of good appearance, suitability, or proportion

e.g. a comely young woman

86

comity

friendly social atmosphere; social harmony
a loose widespread community based on common social institutions

e.g. group activities promoting comity

87

commensurate

equal in measure or extent; coextensive
corresponding in size, extent, amount, or degree; proportionate

e.g. given a job commensurate with her abilities

88

preponderant

having superior weight, force, or influence
having greater prevalence

89

commingle

to blend thoroughly into a harmonious whole

e.g. Fact and fiction commingle in the story.

90

compass

to devise or contrive often with craft or skill; plot
encompass
bring about, achieve; obtain
boundary, circumference; range, scope

e.g. attempting more than his modest abilities could compass
within the compass of the city walls
the compass of my voice

91

commit

to put into charge or trust; entrust; to consign or record for preservation
to carry into action deliberately; perpetrate
obligate, bind

e.g. commit it to memory
commit a crime
a contract committing the company to complete the project on time

92

commodious

comfortably or conveniently spacious; roomy

e.g. a commodious closet

93

commodity

any article of commerce

94

commonwealth

an organization of independent states

95

commotion

a condition of civil unrest or insurrection
steady or recurrent motion
mental excitement or confusion

96

communal

of or relating to one of more communes or communities
characterized by collective ownership and use of property

e.g. communal huts
the communal experience of riding on the train

97

commune

to communicate intimately
a group of people living together and sharing responsibilities, possessions, etc.

e.g. a psychic who communes with the dead

98

commute

change, alter; exchange
to travel back and forth regularly (as between a suburb and a city)

e.g. The judge commuted his death sentence to life imprisonment.

99

compass

to devise or contrive often with craft or skill; plot
encompass
bring about, achieve; obtain
boundary, circumference; range, scope

e.g. attempting more than his modest abilities could compass
within the compass of the city walls
the compass of my voice

100

compatriot

person who was born in the same country

101

compelling

forceful; demanding attention; convincing

e.g. a compelling novel that I cannot put down
a compelling argument/reason

102

compendium

a brief summary of a larger work or of a field of knowledge; abstract
a list of a number of items; collection, compilation

e.g. a compendium of folk tales