Section 1A. Latin to English Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Section 1A. Latin to English Deck (80):
1

 

(The scene moves back in time many years. Euclio’s grandfather, Demaenetus on the day of his daughter’s wedding, fearful that his gold will be stolen amid the confusion of the preparations, entrusts it to the safe keeping of his household god (the Lar). He puts it in a pot and hides it in a hole near the altar.)

drāmatis persōnae

 

 

 

Characters of the play.

 

2

Dēmaenetus: Dēmaenetus senex est, Eucliōnis auus.

Demaenetus: Demaenetus is an old man, Euclio’s grandfather.

3

seruus: seruī nōmen est Dāuus.

a slave: the name of the slave is Davus.

4

serua: seruae nōmen est Pamphila.

a slave woman: the name of the slave woman is Pamphila.

5

coquus et tībīcina.

a cook and a pipe-girl

6

(seruus in scaenam intrat.)

(A slave enters onto the stage.)

7

(ante iānuam Dēmaenetī stat et clāmat.)

(He stands before Demaenetus’ door and shouts.)

8

(cūr clāmat?)

(Why does he shout?)

9

(clāmat quod seruam uocat)

(He shouts because he is calling a slave woman.)

10

SERVVS: “heus, Pamphila! ego Dāuus tē uocō!”

SLAVE: “Hey, Pamphila! I, Davus, am calling you!

11

SERVA: “quis mē uocat? quis clāmat?”

SLAVEWOMAN: “Who is calling me? Who is shouting?”

12

SERVVS: “ego Dāuus tē uocō.”

SLAVE: “I, Davus, am calling you.”

13

SERVA: “quid est? cūr mē uocās?”

SLAVEWOMAN: “What is it? Why are you calling me?”

14

(seruus ad iānuam appropinquat, sed iānua clausa est.)

(The slave approaches [to] the door, but the door is closed.)

15

(seruus igitur iānuam pulsat.)

(Therefore the the slave knocks on the door.)

16

SERVVS: “heus tū, serua! ego iānuam pulsō, at tū nōn aperīs: iānua clausa est.”

SLAVE: “Hey you, slavewoman! I am knocking on the door, but you do not open (it): the door is closed.”

17

SERVA: (iānuam aperit) “cūr clāmās?

SLAVEWOMAN: (Opens the door.) “Why are you shouting?

18

“ego hūc et illūc cursitō, tū autem clāmās.

“I run about here and there, (and) you, however, are shouting.

19

“ego occupāta sum, tū autem ōtiōsus es.

“I am busy, (and) you, however, are idle.

20

“seruus nōn es, sed furcifer.”

“You are not a slave, but a rascal.”

21

SERVVS: “ego ōtiōsus nōn sum, Pamphila.

SLAVE: “I am not idle, Pamphila.

22

“nam hodiē Dēmaenetus, dominus meus, fīliam in mātrimōnium dat: nūptiae fīliae sunt!”

“For today Demaenetus, my master, is giving his daughter in [lit.: to] marriage: (they are) the marriage rites of (his) daughter!”

23

(Dēmaenetus, dominus serui et seruae, in scaenam intrat)

(Demaenetus, the master of the slave and the slavewoman, comes onto the stage.)

24

DĒMAENETVS: “cūr clāmātis, Dāue et Pamphila?

DEMAENETUS: “Why are you shouting, Davus and Pamphila?

25

“cūr stātis?

“Why are you standing?

26

“cūr ōtiōsī estis?

“Why are you idle?

27

“nam hodiē nūptiae fīliae meae sunt.

“For today are the marriate rites of my daughter.

28

“cūr nōn in aedīs intrātis et nūptiās parātis?

“Why don’t you enter [into] the house and prepare marriage rites?”

29

(in aedīs intrant seruus et serua, et nūptiās parant.)

(The slave and the slavewoman enter [into] the house, and prepare the marriage rites.”

30

(in scaenam intrant coquus et tībīcina.)

(Onto the stage enter a cook and a pipe-girl.)

31

(Dēmaenetus coquum et tībīcinam uidet.)

(Demaenetus sees the cook and the pipe-girl.)

32

DĒM. “heus uōs, quī estis?

DEM.: “Hey you, who are you?

33

“ego enim uōs nōn cognōuī.”

“For I do not know you.”

34

COQVVS ET TĪBĪCINA: “coquus et tībīcina sumus.

COOK AND PIPE-GIRL: “We are a cook and a pipe-girl.

35

“ad nūptiās fīliae tuae uenīmus.”

“We’re coming to your daughter’s marriage rites.”

36

DĒM. “cūr nōn in aedīs meās intrātis et nūptiās parātis?

DEM. “Why do you not enter [into] my house and prepare the marriage rites?”

37

(coquus et tībīcina in aedīs Dēmaenetī intrant)

(The cook and the pipe-girl enter [into] Demaenetus’ house.)

38

(Dēmaenetus corōnam et unguentum portat.)

(Demaenetus carries a garland and ointment.)

39

(aulam quoque portat.)

(He also carries a pot.)

40

(aula aurī plēna est)

(The pot is full of gold.)

41

DĒM. ”heu! hodiē nūptiās fīliae meae parō.

DEM: “Alas, today I am preparing my daughter’s marriage rites.

42

“cūncta familia festīnat.

“The whole household hurries (about).

43

“hūc et illūc cursitant puerī et puellae, ego coquōs et tībīcinās uocō.

“Here and there boys and girls are running (about), (and) I am calling cooks and pipe-girls.

44

“nunc aedēs plēnae sunt coquōrum et tībīcinārum, et cūnctī coquī et tībīcinae fūrēs sunt.

“Now the house is full of cooks and pipe-girls, and all cooks and pipe-girls are thieves.

45

“heu! homo perditus sum, immō, perditissimus hominum.

“Alas! I am a man (who is) done for—more precisely, I am the most done for of men.

46

“nam aulam habeō aurī plēnam.

“For I have a pot full of gold.

47

“ecce! aulam portō.”

“Look! I am carrying the pot.

48

(senex aulam mōnstrat.)

(The old man shows the pot.)

49

“nunc aulam sub ueste cēlō.

“Now I hide it under my clothing.

50

“nam ualdē timeō.

“For I am very much afraid.

51

(Sniffs air) “aurum enim olet; et fūrēs aurum olfactant.

“For gold gives off a smell; and thieves sniff out gold.

52

“aurum autem nōn olet, sī sub terrā latet.

“Gold, however, does not give off a smell, if it lies hidden under the earth.

53

“sī aurum sub terrā latet, nūllum coquum nūllam tībīcinam nūllum fūrem timeō.

“If gold lies hidden under the earth, I fear no cook, no pipe-girl, no thief.

54

“aulam igitur clam sub terrā cēlō.

“Therefore I am secretly hiding the pot under the earth.

55

“ecquis mē spectat?”

“Is anyone looking at me?

56

(Dēmaenetus circumspectat.)

(Demaenetus looks around.)

57

(nēmo adest.)

(No one is present.)

58

(Dēmaenetus igitur nēminem uidet.)

(Demaenetus therefore sees no one.)

59

“bene. sōlus sum.

“Good! I am alone.

60

“sed prius ad.Larem appropinquō et unguentum corōnamque dō, et supplicō.”

“But first I approach [to] the Lar and I give (him) ointment and a garland, and I pray.

61

(ad Larem appropinquat.)

(He approaches [to] the Lar.)

62

(unguentum dat et corōnam.)

(He gives oitment and a garland.)

63

(deinde Larī supplicat)

(Then he prays to the Lar.)

64

“ō Lar, tūtēla meae familiae, tē ōrō et obsecrō.

“O Lar, guardian of my household, I beg you and beseech you.

65

“ego tē semper corōnō, semper tibi unguentum dō, semper sacrificium et honōrem.

“I always garland you, I always give you ointment, I always (give you) sacrifice and honor.

66

“tū contrā bonam Fortūnam dās.

“You in return give good Luck.

67

“nunc ad tē aulam aurī plēnam portō.

“Now I carry the pot full of gold to you.

68

“sub ueste autem aulam cēlō.

“Under my clothing, however, I hide the pot.

69

“familia dē aulā ignōrat.

“The household does not know about the pot.

70

“sed hodiē sunt nūptiae fīliae.

“ but today are my daughter’s marriage rites.”

71

“plēnae sunt aedēs coquōrum et tībīcinārum.

“The house is full of cooks and pipe-girls.

72

“immō, fūrum plēnae sunt, aurum olet.

“More precisely, it is full of thieves, (and) it smells of gold.

73

“ego igitur fūrēs timeō.

“Therefore I am afraid of thieves.

74

“ō Lar, tē ōrō et obsecrō.

“O Lar, I beg and beseech you.

75

“aulam seruā!”

“protect (my) pot!

76

(senex ad focum appropinquat.)

(The old man approaches [to] the hearth.)

77

(prope focum fouea est.)

(Near the hearth is a hole.)

78

(in foueā aulam cēlat)

(He hides the pot in the hole.)

79

“ecce. saluum aurum est, saluus quoque ego.

“Look, the gold is safe, (and) I also (am) safe.

80

“nunc enim tū aulam habēs, Lar.”

“For now you have the gold, Lar.”

Decks in Reading Latin: Text (Jones and Sidwell, 2nd edition) Class (80):