Section 1D Latin to English Flashcards Preview

Reading Latin: Text (Jones and Sidwell, 2nd edition) > Section 1D Latin to English > Flashcards

Flashcards in Section 1D Latin to English Deck (68):
1

est uīcīnus Eucliōnis.

There is a neighbor of Euclio.

2

nōmen uīcīnī Megadōrus est.

The name of the neighbor is Megadorus.

3

Megadōrus sorōrem habet.

Megadorus has a sister.

4

nōmen sorōris Eunomia est.

The name of the sister is Eunomia.

5

Megadōrus igitur frāter Eunomiae est, Eunomia soror Megadōrī.

Therefore Megadorus is Eunomia’s brother, Eunomia is Megadorus’ sister.

6

Eunomia fīlium habet.

Eunomia has a son.

7

nōmen fīlī Lycōnidēs est.

The name of (her) son is Lyconides.

8

amat Lycōnidēs Phaedram, Eucliōnis fīliam.

Lyconides is in love with Phaedra, Euclio's daughter.

9

Lycōnidēs Phaedram amat, Phaedra Lycōnidem.

(And while) Lyconides is in love with Phaedra, Phaedra (is in love) with Lyconides.

10

(Eunomia Megadōrum ex aedibus in scaenam dūcit)

(Eunomia leads Megadorus out of the house onto the stage.)

11

MEGADŌRVS: “optima fēmina, dā mihi manum tuam.”

MEGADORUS: “Best woman, give [to] me your hand.”

12

EVNOMIA: “quid dīcis, mī frāter?

EUNOMIA: “What are you saying, my brother?

13

“quis est optima?

“Who is the best (woman)?

14

“fēminam enim optimam nōn uideō.

“For I do not see a best woman.

15

“dīc mihi.”

“Tell [to] me.”

16

MEG. “tū optima es, soror mea.

MEG. “You are the best, my sister.

17

“tē optimam habeō.”

“I regard you as [hold you to be] the best.”

18

EVN. “egone optima?

“I am the best?

19

“tūne mē ita optimam habēs?”

“You yourself regard me as so excellent? [so much the best]”

20

MEG. “ita dīcō.”

“That’s what I say [I speak thus].”

21

EVN. “ut tū mē optimam habēs fēminam, ita ego tē frātrem habeō optimum.

EUN. “As you yourself regard me as the best woman, so I myself regard you as the best brother.

22

“dā igitur mihi operam.”

“Therefore pay attention to me.”

23

MEG. “opera mea tua est.

MEG. “You have my attention.

24

“iubē, soror optima, et monē: ego audiō.

“Command (me), best sister, and advise (me); I am listening.

25

“quid uīs?

“What do you want?

26

“cūr mē ab aedibus dūcis?

“Why are you leading me from the house?

27

“dīc mihi.”

“Tell [to] me.”

28

EVN. “mī frāter, nunc tibi dīco.

EUN. “My brother, now I’m telling [to] you.

29

uxōrem nōn habēs.”

“You do not have a wife.”

30

MEG. “ita est.

MEG. “(That) is so.

31

“sed quid dīcis?”

“But what are you saying?”

32

EVN. “sī uxōrem nōn habēs, nōn habēs līberōs.

EUN. “If you don’t have a wife, you don’t have children.

33

“sed uxōrēs uirōs semper cūrant seruantque et pulchrī līberī monumenta pulchra uirōrum sunt.

“But wives always take care of (their) husbands and protect them, and beautiful children are the memorials of their husbands.

34

“cūr uxōrem domum nōn statim dūcis?”

“Why don’t you marry [lit: lead home] a wife at once?”

35

MEG. “periī, occidī! tacē, soror.

MEG. “I’m lost, I’m done for! Be silent, sister.

36

“quid dīcis? quid uīs?

“What are you saying? What do you want?

37

“ego dīues sum; uxōrēs uirum dīuitem pauperem statim faciunt.”

“I am a rich (man); wives instantly make a rich man a poor one.”

38

EVN. “ut tū frāter es optimus, ita ego fēmina sum optima, sororque optima tua.

EUN. “As you are an excellent brother, so I am an excellent woman, and your excellent sister.

39

“tē ita iubeō moneōque : dūc domum uxōrem!”

“I bid you and advise you thus: marry a wife!”

40

MEG. “sed quam in animō habēs?”

MEG. “But whom do you have in mind?”

41

EVN. “uxōrem dīuitem.”

EUN. “(I have in mind) a wife (who is) rich.”

42

MEG. “sed dīues sum satis, et satis pecūniae aurīque habeō.”

MEG. “But I am a rich enough, and I have enough [of] money and [of] gold.

43

“praetereā uxōrēs dīuitēs domī nimis pecūniae aurīque rogant.

“Furthermore rich wives at home ask (for) too much [of] money and [of] gold.

44

“nōn amō uxōrum dīuitum clāmōrēs, imperia, eburāta uehicula, pallās, purpuram. sed . . .”

“I do not love the shouts, the commands, the wagons adorned with ivory, the garments, (and) the purple of rich wives. But ....”

45

EVN. “dīc mihi, quaesō, quam uīs uxōrem?”

EUN. “Tell [to] me, please [lit.: I ask], what wife do you want?”

46

MEG. (sēcum cōgitat, tum . . .) “puella uīcīna, Phaedra nōmine, fīlia Eucliōnis, satis pulchra est . . .”

MEG. (he thinks to [with] himself, then...) “The girl next door, Phaedra by name, Euclio’s daughter, is quite pretty [lit.: pretty enough] ...

47

EVN. “quam dīcis? puellamne Eucliōnis?

EUN. “Whom do do you say? Euclio’s girl?

48

“ut tamen pulchra est, ita est pauper.

“But she is as poor as she is pretty. [lit.: as, however, she is pretty, so she is poor]

49

“nam pater Phaedrae pecūniam habet nūllam.

“For Phaedra’s father has no money.

50

“Eucliō tamen, quamquam senex est nec satis pecūniae aurīque habet, nōn malus est.”

“Euclio, however, although he is an old man and does not [lit.: nor] have enough [of] money and [of] gold, is not a bad (man).”

51

MEG. “sī dīuitēs uxōrēs sunt dōtemque magnam habent, post nūptiās magnus est uxōrum sūmptus:

MEG. “If wives are rich and have a large dowry, after the marriage-rites the expenditure of wives is great:

52

“stant fullō, phrygiō, aurifex, lānārius, caupōnēs flammāriī;

“there are [lit.: there stand} the fuller, the embroiderer, the goldsmith, the woolworker, shopkeepers (and) makers of bridal-veils;

53

“stant manuleāriī, stant propōlae, linteōnēs, calceolāriī;

“there are the makers of sleaves, there are retailers, linen-weavers, shoemakers;

54

“strophiāriī adstant, adstant simul sōnāriī.

“sellers of breast-bands are standing there, at the same time sash-makers are standing there.

55

“pecūniam dās, abeunt.

“You give money, they go away.

56

“tum adstant thȳlacistae in aedibus,

“Then collectors of offerings are standing there in the house,

57

“textōrēs limbulāriī, arculāriī.

“(and) weavers concerned with making ornamental hems, chest-makers.

58

“pecūniam dās, abeunt.

“You give money, they go away.

59

“intolerābilis est sūmptus uxōrum, sī dōtem magnam habent.

“The expense of wives is unendurable, if they have a large dowry.

60

“sed sī uxor dōtem nōn habet, in potestāte uirī est.”

“But if a wife does not have a dowry, she is in the power of her husband.”

61

EVN. “rēctē dīcis, frāter.

EUN. “You speak rightly, brother.

62

“cūr nōn domum Eucliōnis adīs?”

“Why do you not approach the Euclio’s home?”

63

MEG. “adeō.

MEG. “I approach (it).

64

“ecce, Eucliōnem nunc uideō.

“Look, now I see Euclio.

65

“ā forō redit.”

“He is returning from the forum.”

66

EVN. “ualē, mī frāter.”

EUN. “Goodby, my brother.”

67

(exit ē scaenā soror Megadōrī)

(Megadorus’ sister leaves [from] the stage.)

68

MEG. “et tū ualē, soror mea.”

MEG. “And goodbye to you, my sister.”

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