Section 5A(i). Curius, Fulvia, and Cicero Flashcards Preview

Reading Latin: Text (Jones and Sidwell, 2nd edition) > Section 5A(i). Curius, Fulvia, and Cicero > Flashcards

Flashcards in Section 5A(i). Curius, Fulvia, and Cicero Deck (30):
1

sed in eā coniūrātiōne fuit Q. Curius, ...

But there was in that conspiracy Quintus Curius, ...

2

... nātus haud obscūrō locō, ...

... born in no obscure place ... [litotes!]

3

... libīdinibus adeō dēditus, ...

... given so much to pleasures, ...

4

... ut eum cēnsōrēs senātū mouērent.

... that the censors removed him from the Senate.

5

huic hominī tanta uānitās inerat ...

There was such great vanity in this person, ...

6

... ut nōn posset reticēre quae audierat;

... that he could not keep quiet about (the things) which he had heard;

7

tanta īnsolentia ut numquam sua ipse scelera cēlāret:

(there was) such great insolence that he never himself concealed his own crimes:

8

tanta audācia ut semper dīceret faceretque quaecumque uolēbat.

(there was) such great boldness that he always said and did whatever he wanted.

9

erat eī cum Fuluiā, muliere nōbilī, stuprī uetus cōnsuētūdō.

He had a long-standing intimacy (consisting of) sexual misconduct with Fulvia, a noble woman.

10

sed Curius tam pauper factus est ut eī minus grātus fieret.

But Curius was made (into) such a poor man that he became less attractive to her.

11

repente autem adeō glōriārī coepit ut maria montīsque Fuluiae pollicērētur.

Suddenly however he began to boast so much that he was promising (to) Fulvia the seas and the mountains.

12

et tam īnsolēns ferōxque fīēbat ...

And he was becoming so arrogant and fierce ...

13

... ut eī mortem interdum minārētur, ...

...that he would sometimes threaten her with death [threaten death to her], ...

14

... nisi sibi obnoxia esset.

... unless she were to be servile to him.

15

at Fuluia, īnsolentiae Curī causā cognitā, ...

But Fulvia, once the reason for Curio’s arrogance was known, ...

16

... rem reī pūblicae tam perīculōsam esse putābat, ...

... thought that the business was so dangerous to the commonwealth, ...

17

... ut, omnia, quae dē Catilīnae coniūrātiōne audierat, multīs nārrāret.

... that she reported (to) many (people) all the things she had heard about the conspiracy of Catiline.

18

eae rēs, ā Fuluiā nārrātae, ...

Those affairs, reported by Fulvia, ...

19

... in prīmīs effēcērunt ut cōnsulātus M. Tulliō Cicerōnī mandārētur.

... especially brought it about that that the consulship was entrusted to Marcus Tullius Cicero.

20

namque anteā plēraque nōbilitās tam inuida erat ...

For previously most of the nobility was so envious ...

21

... ut cōnsulātum nouō hominī mandāre nōllent.

... that they did not want to entrust the consulship to a new man.

22

nam “polluātur cōnsulātus,” inquiēbant, ...

For they would say “the consulship would be polluted, ...

23

... “sī eum quamuīs ēgregius homo nouus adipīscātur.”

“... if a new man, worthy though he is, should obtain it.”

24

sed ubi perīculum aduēnit, inuidia atque superbia post fuēre.

But when danger approached, envy and pride were subordinate.

25

igitur, comitiīs habitīs, cōnsulēs dēclārantur M. Tullius et C. Antōnius;

Therefore, after the elections have been held, Marcus Tullius and Gaius Antonius are declared consuls.

26

quod factum prīmō coniūrātōrēs concusserat.

Which fact first had shaken the conspirators.

27

neque tamen Catilīnae furor minuēbātur, ...

However, the fury of Catiline was not lessened, ...

28

... sed in diēs plūra agitāre, ...

... but he stirred up more things day by day, ...

29

... arma per Ītaliam locīs opportūnīs parāre, ...

... he prepared weapons throughout Italy in strategic places, ...

30

... pecūniam Faesulās ad Mānlium quendam portāre.

... (and) he carried money to Faesulae to a certain Manlius.

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