Section 1G Latin to English Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Section 1G Latin to English Deck (113):
1

Euclio now looks around for a place to hide his gold safely outside the house. He settles on the shrine of Fidēs (‘Trust’, ‘Credit’) – but unknown to him, he is overheard by a neighbouring slave, Strobilus.



 



EVC.: “ecce! fānum uideō.


 



 



 



EUC. “Look! I see a shrine.”


2

“quis deus fānī est? ā. Fidēs est.

“Who is the god of the shrine? aha! It is Faith.

3

“dīc mihi, Fidēs, tūne uīs mihi custōs bona esse?

“Tell me, Faith, do you yourself wish to be a good guardian for me?

4

“nam nunc tibi ferō omne aurum meum;

“For now I am carrying to you all my gold;

5

“aulam aurī plēnam bene custōdī, Fidēs!

“guard well the pot full of gold, Faith!

6

“prohibē fūrēs omnēs.

“Stop all thieves.

7

“nunc fānō tuō aurum meum crēdō.

“Now I entrust my gold to your shrine.

8

“aurum in fānō tuō situm est.”

“The gold is placed in your shrine.”

9

(Eucliō in aedīs redit.)

(Euclio returns [in]to (his) house.)

10

(in scaenam intrat Strobīlus seruus.)

(On to the stage enters the slave Strobilus.)

11

(omnia Eucliōnis uerba audit)

(He hears all Euclio’s words.)

12

STROBĪLUS: “dī immortālēs! quid audiō?

STROBILUS: “Immortal gods! What do I hear?

13

“quid dīcit homo?

“What is the man saying?

14

“quid facit?

“What is he doing?

15

“aurumne fānō crēdit?

“Is he entrusting (his) gold to the shrine?

16

“aurumne in fānō situm est?

“Is the gold placed in the shrine?

17

“cūr in fānum nōn ineō et aurum hominī miserō auferō?”

“Why don’t I go into the shrine and steal the gold from [to the disadvantage of] the miserable man?”

18

(Strobīlus in fānum init.)

(Strobilus goes into the shrine.)

19

(Eucliō autem audit et domō exit.)

(Euclio, however, hears (him) and comes out of the house.)

20

(Strobīlum in fānō inuenit.)

(He finds Strobilus in the shrine.)

21

EVC. “ī forās, lumbrīce!

EUC.: “Come outside, worm!

22

“quārē in fānum clam inrēpis?

“Why are you secretly sneaking into the shrine?

23

“quid mihi ā fānō aufers, scelus?

“What are you taking from me [to my disadvantage] out of the shrine, criminal?

24

“quid facis?”

“What are you doing?”

25

(Eucliō statim hominī plāgās dat.)

(Euclio at once gives the man blows.)

26

STRO.: “quid tibi negōtī mēcum est?

STRO.: “What business do you have [is there to you] with me?

27

“cūr mē uerberās?”

“Why are you beating me?”

28

EVC.: “uerberābilissime, etiam mē rogās, fūr, trifūr?

“Most floggable (one), are you even asking me, (you) thief, (you) triple thief?

29

“quid mihi ā fānō aufers?”

“What are you taking from me [to my disadvantage] out of the shrine?”

30

STRO.: “nīl tibi auferō.”

STRO.: “I am taking nothing from you.”

31

EVC.: “age, redde statim mihi.”

EUC. “Come, give (it) back to me at once.”

32

STRO.: “quid uīs mē tibi reddere?”

STRO.: “What do you want me to give back?”

33

EVC.: “rogās?”

EUC.: “Do you ask?”

34

STRO.: “nīl tibi auferō.”

STRO.: “I take nothing from you.”

35

EVC.: “age, dā mihi.”

EUC.: “Come, give (it) to me.”

36

STRO.: “nīl habeō.

STRO.: “I have nothing.”

37

“quid uīs tibi?”

“What do you want [for yourself]?”

38

EVC.: “ostende mihi manum tuam.”

EUC. “Show [to] me your hand.”

39

STRO.: “tibi ostendō.”

STRO.: “I’m showing it to you.”

40

EVC.: “age, manum mihi ostende alteram.”

EUC.: “Come, show me your other hand.”

41

STRO.: “em tibi.”

STRO.: “There, (I show it) to you.”

42

EVC.: “uideō. age, tertiam quoque ostende.”

EUC.: “I see. Come, show me also your third (hand).”

43

STRO.: “homo īnsānus est!”

STRO.: “The man is crazy!”

44

EVC.: “dīc mihi, quid ā fānō aufers?”

EUC.: “Tell [to] me, what are you taking away from the shrine?”

45

STRO.: “dī mē perdunt!

STRO.: “The gods are destroying me!”

46

“nīl habeō, nīl ā fānō auferō!”

“I have nothing, I am taking nothing away from the shrine.”

47

EVC.: “age rūrsum mihi ostende manum dextram.”

EUC.: “Come show me your right hand again.”

48

STRO.: “em.”

STRO.: “Here!”

49

EVC.: “nunc laeuam quoque ostende.”

EUC.: “now show your left (hand) as well.”

50

STRO.: “ecce ambās prōferō.”

STRO. “Look I hold out both.”

51

EVC.: “redde mihi quod meum est!”

EUC.: “Return to me what is mine!”

52

STRO.: “dīc mihi, quid mē uīs tibi reddere?”

STRO.: “Tell [to] me, what do you want me to return to you?”

53

EVC.: “certē habēs.”

EUC.: “Without a doubt you have it.”

54

STRO.: “habeō ego? quid habeō?”

STRO.: “I have it? What do I have?”

55

EVC.: “nōn tibi dīcō.

EUC.: “I am not telling [to] you.”

56

“age, redde mihi.”

“Come, return it to me.”

57

STRO.: “īnsānus es!”

STRO.: “You are mad!”

58

(Euclio gives up) EVC.: “periī. nīl habet homo.

(Euclio gives up) EUC.: “I’m lost. The man has nothing.

59

“abī statim, scelus!

“Leave at once, criminal!”

60

“cūr nōn abīs?”

“Why do you not leave?”

61

STRO.: “abeō.”

STRO.: “I’m leaving.”

62

(Eucliō in fānum init.)

(Euclio goes into the shrine.)

63

(aurum inuenit, et ē fānō portat.)

(He finds the gold, and carries it out out of the shrine.)

64

(In alterō locō clam cēlat.)

(He hides it secretly in another place.)

65

But Strobilus, determined to get revenge on Euclio, has kept an eye on Euclio, and this time steals the gold without giving himself away. Euclio enters in a paroxysm of grief and anger. After vainly appealing to the spectators for help, he is met by Lyconides, the young man responsible for Phaedra’s pregnancy (though Euclio does not know it). Phaedra has, in fact, given birth, so the marriage with Megadorus is off, and Lyconides has decided it is time to confess all to Euclio and ask for Phaedra’s hand in marriage. A delightful misunderstanding arises as to who has ‘laid his hands’ on what.



 



EVC.: “occidī, periī!


 



 



 



 



EUC.: “I’m dead! I’m done for!


66

“quō currō? quō nōn currō?


“Where do I run [to]? Where do I not run?


67

(spectātōribus) “tenēte, tenēte fūrem!

(to the audience) “Hold (him), hold the thief!”

68

“sed quī fūr est?

“But who is the thief?”

69

“quem fūrem dīcō?

“Whom do I say is a thief?”

70

“nesciō, nīl uideō, caecus eō.

“I don’t know, I see nothing, I go blind.

71

“quis aulam meam aurī plēnam aufert mihi?

“Who is carring my pot full of gold to me?

72

(spectātōribus) “dīcite mihi, spectātōrēs, quis aulam habet?

(to the audience) “Tell me, audience, who has the pot?

73

“nescītis? ō mē miserum!”

“You don’t know? O miserable me!”

74

(in scaenam intrat Lyconidēs, iuuenis summā. pulchritūdine, nūllā.continentiā)

(Lyconides comes on stage, a young man of the greatest beauty, (and) no self-restraint.)

75

LYCŌNIDĒS: “quī homo ante aedīs nostrās plōrat?

LYCONIDES: “Who [what person] is weeping before our house?

76

“edepol, Eucliō est, Phaedrae pater.

“By Pollux, it is Euclio, Phaedra’s father.

77

“certē ego periī.

“Without a doubt I am done for.

78

“nam Eucliō uir summā.uirtūte est;

“For Euclio is a man of great uprightness;

79

“certō omnia dē fīliā scit.

“He knows everything about (his) daughter for a fact.

80

“quid mihi melius est facere?

“What is the better thing for me to do?

81

“melius est mihi abīre an manēre?

“Is it better for me to depart or to remain?

82

“edepol, nesciō.”

“By Pollux, I don’t know.”

83

EVC.: “heus tū, quis es?”

EUC.: “Hey you, who are you?”

84

LYC.: “ego sum miser.”

LYC.: “I am a miserable man.”

85

EVC.: “immō ego sum.”

EUC.: “Actually I myself am (a miserable man).”

86

LYC.: “es bonō animō.”

LYC.: “Be cheerful [of good mind].”

87

EVC.: “quid mihi dīcis?

EUC.: “What are you saying to me?

88

“cūr mē animō bonō esse uīs?:

“Why do you want me to be cheerful?”

89

LYC.: “facinus meum est, fateor, et culpa mea.”

LYC.: “The crime is mine, I confess, the fault is mine.”

90

EVC.: “quid ego ex tē audiō?”

EUC.: “What am I hearing from you?”

91

LYC.: “nīl nisi uērum.

LYC.: “Nothing except (what is) true.

92

“facinus meum est, culpa mea.”

“The crime is mine, the fault is mine.”

93

EVC.: “ō scelus, cūr tū tangis quod meum est?”

EUC.: “O (you) criminal, why are you touching what is mine?”

94

LYC.: “nesciō. sed animō aequō es!

LYC.: “I don’t know. But be cheerful.

95

“mihi ignōsce!”

“Forgive me.”

96

EVC.: “uae tibi! iuuenis summā audāciā, nūllā continentiā es!

EUC.: “Shame on you! You are a young man of great boldness, (and) no self-restraint!

97

“cūr tū quod meum est tangis, impudēns?”

“Why are you touching what is mine, shameless!”

98

LYC.: “propter uīnum et amōrem.

LYC.: “On account of wine and love.

99

“animō aequō es!

“Be cheerful!

100

“mihi ignōsce!”

“Forgive me!”

101

EVC.: “scelus, impudēns!

EUC.: “Criminal, shameless!

102

“nimis uīle uīnum et amor est, sī ēbriō licet quiduīs facere.”

“Wine and love are [is] an excessively cheap thing, if it is permitted to a drunkard to do anything at all [whatever you like].”

103

LYC.: “sed ego iuuenis summā uirtūte sum, et habēre uolō quod tuum est.”

LYC.: “But I am a young man of great uprightness, and I wish to have what is yours.”

104

EVC.: “quid dīcis mihi?

EUC.: “What are you saying to me?

105

“impudēns, statim mihi refer quod meum est.”

“Shameless, bring back at once what is mine.”

106

LYC.: “sed quid uīs mē tibi referre?”

LYC.: “But what do you want me to bring back to you?”

107

EVC.: “id quod mihi aufers.”

EUC.: “That which you are taking from me.”

108

LYC.: “sed quid est?

LYC.: “But what is it?

109

“nīl tibi auferō!

“I am taking nothing from you!

110

“dīc mihi, quid habeō quod tuum est?”

“Tell me, what do I have that is yours?”

111

EVC.: “aulam aurī plēnam dīcō!

EUC. “I’m talking (about) the pot full of gold!

112

“redde mihi!”

“Return (it) to me!”

113

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