Chapter 16b. English to Latin Flashcards Preview

Wheelock's Latin Translation > Chapter 16b. English to Latin > Flashcards

Flashcards in Chapter 16b. English to Latin Deck (50):
1

1. Strong men and women were living before our age.

1. Fortēs virī et fēminae ante aetātem nostram vīvēbant.

2

2. Yesterday he was sending those one hundred sad old men (away) from Italy across difficult seas.

2. Eōs centum senēs miserōs ab Italiā trans maria difficilia heri mittēbat.

3

3a. Those two men expelled all (their) desires from themselves,

3a. Illī duo virī omnēs cupiditātēs ex sē ēiēcērunt,

4

3b. for they feared the nature of the body.

3b. nam nātūram corporis timuērunt.

5

4a. The powerful queen, because she held herself in high regard, shunned those (notorious) three (men) ...

4a. Potēns rēgīna, quoniam sē dīlēxit, istōs trēs vītāvit ....

6

4b. and never joined herself with them.

4b. et sē cum eīs numquam iūnxit.

7

5a. And so I was standing there among them ...

5a. Itaque inter eōs ibi stābam ....

8

5b. and for a long time I was waiting for the signal with a brave spirit.

5b. et signum cum animō fortī diū exspectābam.

9

6. A swift rumor was running without delay through the mouths and ears of all.

6. Celer rūmor per ōra aurēsque omnium sine morā currēbat.

10

7. The violence of war, however, changed his/her life in a few hours.

7. Vīs bellī acerbī autem vītam eius paucīs hōrīs mūtāvit.

11

8a. Five of the sailors dragged themselves out of the water ...

8a. Quīnque ex nautīs sē ex aquā trāxērunt ...

12

8b. and they entrusted themselves to mighty Caesar.

8b. sēque Caesarī potentī commīsērunt.

13

9. Caesar could not join his (own) forces with the king’s swift forces.

9. Caesar nōn poterat suās cōpiās cum celeribus cōpiīs rēgis iungere.

14

10a. Themistocles once was calling (on) all the citizens ...

10a. Themistoclēs omnēs cīvēs ōlim appellābat ...

15

10b. and with his sharp mind he would hold (on to) their names.

10b. et nōmina eōrum ācrī memoriā tenēbat.

16

11a. There are many clouds in the sky ...

11a. In caelō sunt multae nūbēs

17

11b. and the farmer’s animals do not do well in bad weather.

11b. et animālia agricolae tempestāte malā nōn valent.

18

12. Pater māterque saepe ad urbem veniēbant cum duo fīliīs [female] dulcibus.

12. The father and the mother often used to come to the city with (their) two sweet daughters.

19

13. Animī fortium virōrum fēminārumque numquam tempora difficilia timēbunt.

13. The souls of brave men and women will never fear difficult times.

20

14. Intellegitne nunc iūra omnia hōrum quattuor virōrum?

14. Does he now understand all the rights of these four men?

21

15a. Medicus fortem puellam adiūvāre nōn potuit,

15a. The doctor [male] could not help the brave girl,

22

15b. mors enim erat celer.

15b. for death was swift.

23

1. How sweet is freedom!

1. Quam dulcis est lībertās!

24

2. Work conquers everything [lit. “all things.”]

2. Labor omnia vīcit.

25

3. Fortune favors the brave (people).

3. Fortūna fortes̄ adiuvat.

26

4. How swift and sharp is the mind!

4. Quam celeris et ācris est mēns!

27

5. Polyphemus was an abhorrent monstrosity, hideous, huge.

5. Polyphēmus erat mōnstrum horrendum, īnfōrme, ingēns.

28

6. A woman is always a fickle and changeable thing.

6. Varium et mūtābile semper fēmina.

29

7a. It’s an easy thing to write epigrams prettily,

7a. Facile est epigrammata bellē scrībere,

30

7b. but it’s a difficult thing to write a book.

7b. sed librum scībere difficile est.

31

8. Anger is short madness: govern your spirit.

8. Īra furor brevis est; animum rege

32

9. The art of poetry is not to say everything.

9. Ars poētica est nōn omnia dīcere.

33

10. Nothing is happy on [lit. “from”] every side.

10. Nihil est ab omnī parte beātum.

34

11. My book nourishes people with sage advice.

11. Liber meus hominēs prūdentī cōnsiliō alit.

35

12. The mother of all the good arts is wisdom.

12. Māter omnium bonārum artium sapientia est.

36

13a. Clemency makes a king safe;

13a. Clēmentia rēgem salvum facit;

37

13b. for the love of all the citizens is an impregnable defence of a king.

13b. nam amor omnium cīvium est inexpugnābile mūnīmentum rēgis.

38

14. Life is short; art (is) long.

14. Vīta est brevis; ars, longa.

39

15. A short period of an age, however, is long enough for living will.

15. Breve tempus aetātis autem satis longum est ad bene vīvendum.

40

16. He/she lives and will live thanks to the memory of all the ages.

16. Vīvit et vīvet per omnium saeculōrum memoriam.

41

1. Will I always be (only) a listener?

1. Semper ego audītor erō?

42

2. There is a crowd of poets in this city—

2. Est turba poētārum in hāc urbe—

43

3. therefore I will always be a poet!

3. ego igitur erō poēta!

44

4. There are thousands of crimes in the city—

4. Sunt mīlia vitiōrum in urbe—

45

5. I will write about the crimes!

5. dē istīs vitiīs scrībam!

46

6. It is a difficult thing not to write satire.

6. Difficile est saturam nōn scrībere.

47

7. If nature can’t help me, indignation will make the poetry.

7. Sī nātūra mē adiuvāre nōn potest, facit indignātiō versum.

48

8. In my book will be all the deeds of people [“of humans”]—

8. In librō meō erunt omnia facta hominum—

49

9. fear, anger, pleasure, blame, desire, plots.

9. timor, īra, voluptās, culpa, cupiditās, īnsidiae.

50

10. There is now a full supply of crimes in this miserable city of Rome!

10. Nunc est plēna cōpia vitiōrum in hāc miserā urbe Romae!

Decks in Wheelock's Latin Translation Class (76):