Chapter 9a. Latin to English Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Chapter 9a. Latin to English Deck (37):
1

1. Hic tōtus liber multōs locōs litterārum Rōmānārum laudat.

1. This whole book praises many passages of Roman literature.

2

2. Hī igitur illīs deābus heri grātiās agēbant.

2. These (men, people) therefore were giving thanks to those goddesses yesterday.

3

3a. Illud dē vitiīs istīus rēgīnae nunc scrībam,

3a. I will now write that (thing) about the queen’s faults,

4

3b. et ista poenās dabit.

3b. and that (despicable) one [female] will pay the penalty [lit. pl.].

5

4. Neuter alterī plēnam cōpiam pecūniae tum dabit.

4. Neither (person) will then give an abundant supply of money to the other.

6

5. Potestne laus ūllīus terrae esse perpetua?

5. Can the praise of any land be lasting?

7

6. Labor ūnīus numquam poterit hās cōpiās vincere.

6. The work of one (person) will never be able to defeat these forces.

8

7. Mōrēs istīus scrīptōris erant nimis malī.

7. The character of that (wretched) writer was excessively evil.

9

8. Nūllī magistrī, tamen, sub istō vēra docēre audēbant.

8. No teachers [male], however, dared to teach truth [lit. “true things”] under that dreadful [man].

10

9. Valēbuntne pāx et lībertās in patria nostrā post hanc victōriam?

9. Will peace and freedom fare well in our native land after this victory?

11

10. Dum illī ibi remanent, aliī nihil agunt, aliī discunt.

10. While those (men, people) are staying there, some do nothing, others learn.

12

11. Cicero was writing about the glory of the other man and (of his) wife.

11. Cicerō scrībēbat dē glōria alterīus virī et uxōris.

13

12. The whole state was thanking this man’s brother alone.

12. Tōta cīvitās gratiās agēbat sōlī frātrī huius virī.

14

13. On account of that courage (of yours) those (men) will lead no troops into these places tomorrow.

13. Propter istam virtūtem illī nūllās cōpiās dūcent in haec loca heri.

15

14. Will either new book be able to point out and overcome the faults of these times?

14. Poteritne uter liber dēmōnstrāre superāreque vitia hōrum temporum?

16

15. Ubi illās nunc vidēre possum?

15. Where can I see them [female] now?

17

16. Hic illam virginem in mātrimōnium dūcet.

16. This (man) will marry that maiden.

18

17. Huic cōnsiliō palmam dō.

17. I give the palm to this advice.

19

18. Vīrtūtem enim illīus virī amāmus.

18. For we love the courage of that man.

20

19. Sōlus hunc iuvāre potes.

19. You [sg., male] alone can help.

21

20a. Poena istīus unīus hunc morbum cīvitātis relevābit ...

20a. Punishment of this one (wretched) (person, man, woman) will relieve the sickenss of the city ...

22

20b. sed perīculum semper remanēbit.

20b. but the danger will always remain.

23

21. Hī enim dē exitiō huius cīvitātis et tōtīus orbis terrārum cōgitant.

21. For these (men) are thinking about the destruction of this state and of the whole world.

24

22. Est nūllus locus utrī hominī in hāc terrā.

22. There is no place for either person in this land.

25

23. Nōn sōlum ēventus hoc docet—iste est magister stultōrum!—sed etiam ratiō.

23. Not only does the outcome teach this (thing)—it is the teacher [male] of stupid (people)—but also reason.

26

The scansion of Martial 12.10.

This poem is written in “limping iambs."  Each line has five iambs ( ∪  -–) followed by either a trochee (– - ∪) or a spondee (– - - –).   The first short syllable of the first and third iambs can be replaced by a long.   Thus:
             _             _
             ∪ -  ∪  - ∪ - ∪ - ∪ - ∪ -  - x

In the first line of Martial 12.10 the first syllable of the first iamb is apparently replaced by two shorts; I cannot find this phenomenon discussed in the literature.

 

Limping iambs are also called "scazons" ("Greek for "limpings") or "choliambics" (Greek for "angry iambs").   The meter is particularly associated with the archaic Greek poet Hipponax of Ephesus, famous for the poetry of insult and mockery.   Limping iambs are also used occasionally by Catullus, most famously in his poem 8, miser Catulle, desinas ineptire, where the poet is apparently mocking himself.

27

24b. read in meter:

 

Habet Āfricānus mīliēns, tamen captat.

24b. Hăbĕt AHFrĭCAHnŭs MEELĭAYNS, tăMEHN CAHPTat

28

24c. read in meter:

 

Fortūna multīs dat nimis, satis nūllī.

24c. ForTOONah MULTEES DAHT nimIHSS satISS NOOLEE.

29

24d. read Martial 12.10

 

                                   Habet Āfricānus mīliēns, tamen captat.

                                   Fortūna multīs dat nimis, satis nūllī.

24d.

 

                                       Hăbĕt Āfrĭcānus mīliēns, tămen captăt.
                                       Fŏrtūna multīs dat nĭmis, sătis nūlli.

30

25. Sī vīs studēre philosophiae animōque,

25. I you want to pursue philosophy and the mind,

31

26. hoc studium nōn potest valēre sine frūgālitāte.

26. this pursuit cannot fare well without frugality.

32

27. Haec frūgālitās est paupertās volutāria.

27. This frugality is voluntary poverty.

33

28. Tolle, igitur, istās excūsātiōnēs:

28. Therefore, take away those excuses of yours.

34

39. “Nōndum satis pecūniae habeō.

29. “I don’t yet have enough money.

35

30. Si quando illud ‘satis’ habēbō,

30. If I ever will have that ‘enough,’

36

31. tum mē tōtum philosophiae dabō.”

31. then I will give myself entirely to philosophy.”

37

32. Incipe nunc philosophiae, nōn pecūniae, studēre.

32. Begin now to pursue philosophy, not money.

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