Chapter 27a Latin to English Flashcards Preview

Wheelock's Latin Translation > Chapter 27a Latin to English > Flashcards

Flashcards in Chapter 27a Latin to English Deck (72):
1

1. Quisque cupit quam pulcherrima atque ūtilissima dōna dare.

1. Each (person) wants to give the most beautiful and useful gifts.

2

2. Quīdam turpēs habent plūrima ....

2. Some base (people) have very many (things) ...

3

2b. sed etiam plūra petunt.

2b. but they seek even more.

4

3. Ille orator, ab tyrannō superbissimō expulsus,

3. That orator, (having been) expelled by the extremely proud tyrant,

5

3b. ducem iūcundiōrem et lēges aequiōrēs dehinc quaesīvit.

3b. next sought [quaerō] a more pleasant leader and more equitable laws.

6

4. Summum imperium optimīs virīs semper petendum est.

4. Supreme power should always be sought [petō] by the best men. [passive periphrastic]

7

5. Senex nepōtibus trīstibus casam patefēcit ...

5. The old man opened (his) house to his sad grandsons ...

8

5b. et eōs trans līmen invītāvit.

5b. and invited them across the threshold.

9

6. Ostendit [perfect] ultimum signum lūce clārissmā ab hostibus illā nocte datum esse.

6. He/she showed [ostendō] that the final signal had been given by the enemy on that night with an extremely bright light.

10

7. Iste tyrannus pessimus negāvit sē virōs līberōs umquam oppressisse.

7. That extremely bad tyrant denied that he had ever oppressed free men.

11

8. Fidēlissimus servus plus cēnae ad mēnsam accipiēbat quam trēs peiōrēs.

8. The most faithful slave was receiving more of the dinner at [lit. “up to”] the table than three worse ones.

12

9. Āiunt hunc auctōrem vītam humillimam hīc agere.

9. They say that this author is living an extremely humble life here.

13

10. Cūr dī superī oculōs ā rēbus hūmānīs eō tempore āvertērunt?

10. Why did the gods above turn (their) eyes from human affairs at that time?

14

11. Habēsne pecūniam et rēs tuās prae rē pūblicā?

11. Do you consider [habeō] money and your [sg.] affairs before the commonwealth?

15

12. Sōlem post paucās nūbēs gracillimās in caelō hodiē vidēre possumus.

12. We can see the sun in the sky behind a few extremely thin clouds.

16

13. Some believe [putō] that very large cities are worse than very small ones.

13. Quīdam putant urbēs maximās peiōrēs esse quam minimās.

17

14. In return for the three rather small gifts,

14. Prō tribus minōribus donīs,

18

14b. the young man gave even more and prettier ones to his very sad mother.

14b. adulēscēns dedit etiam plūrima et pulchriōra trīstissimae mātrī.

19

15. Those very large mountains were higher than these.

15. Illī montēs maximī erant altiōrēs quam hī.

20

1. Trahit mē nova vīs:

1. A new force is dragging me:

21

1b. vidēo meliōra probōque,

1b. I see the better (things) and I approve them;

22

1c. sed peiōra tantum faciō et nescīo cūr.

1c. But I only do the worse and I don’t know why.

23

2. Quaedam carmina sunt bona; plūra sunt mala.

2. Some songs (poems) are good; more are bad.

24

3. Optimum est.

3. It’s (for the) best.

25

3b. Nihil melius, nihil pulchrius hōc vīdī.

3b. I have seen nothing better, nothing more beautiful, than this (or him).

26

4. Spērō tē et hunc nātālem et plūrimōs aliōs quam fēlīcissimōs āctūrum esse.

4. I hope that you [male, sg.] will have [lit: “do”] both this birthday and very many others as happy as possible. [= “Many happy returns of the day!]

27

5. Quoniam cōnsilium et ratio sunt in senibus,

5. Since counsel and reason are in old (men),

28

5b. maiōrēs nostrī summum concilium appellāvērunt “senātum.”

5b. our ancestors named the highest council “senate.”

29

6. Plūs operae studiīque in rēbus domesticīs nōbīs nunc pōnendum est etiam quam in rēbus mīlitāribus.

6. More (of) work and study should now be placed by us in domestic affairs even than in military affairs.

30

7. Neque enim perīculum in rē pūblicā fuit gravius umquam neque ōtium maius.

7. For never in the commonwealth was ever danger more serious nor leisure greater.

31

8. Sumus sapientiōrēs illīs,

8. We are wiser than those (people),

32

8a. quod nōs nātūram esse optimam ducem scīmus.

8b. because we (ourselves) know that nature is the best [feminine, agreeing with natūram] leader.

33

9. Nātūra minimum petit;

9. Nature seeks (a) very little (thing);

34

9a. nātūrae autem sē sapiēns accommodat.

9b. but the wise (person) accommodates himself/herself to nature.

35

10. Maximum remedium īrae mora est.

10. The greatest remedy for anger is delay.

36

11. Quī animum vincit et īram continet, eum cum summīs virīs nōn comparō ...

11. (He) who conquers his mind and contains anger, him I do not compare to the highest men ...

37

11a. sed eum esse simillimum deō dīcō.

11b. but I say he is most like to a god.

38

12. Dionȳsius, tyrannus urbis pulcherrimae,

12. Dionysius, the tyrant of a very beautiful city,

39

12b. erat vir summae in vīctū temperantiae ...

12b. was a man of the greatest temperance in (his) way of life ....

40

12c. et in omnibus rebus dīligentissimus et ācerrimus.

12c. and (he was) most diligent and eager in all affairs.

41

12d. Īdem tamen erat ferōx ac iniūstus.

12d. This same (person), however, was fierce and unjust.

42

12e. Quā ex rē, sī vērum dīcimus, vidēbatur miserrimus.

12e. For that reason, if we speak the truth, he seemed (to be) extremely miserable.

43

13. Nisi superōs vetere possum, Acheronta movēbō.

13. Unless I am able to turn the (gods) above, I will move Acheron.

44

1. review the hendecasyllabic meter

1. Hendecasyllabic (also called Phalaecian)

For practical purpose the scheme is: 

 

                                           -   -   -  ∪  ∪  - ∪  - ∪ - x

 

Sometimes either the first or the second beat can be short but we can ignore that and just assume the first three beats are always long.

45

2. read aloud and translate:

 

Caelī, Lesbia nostra, Lesbia illa,

2.

 

CAELEE LEHSia LEHSbih’ IHLLa

Caelius, our Lesbia, that Lesbia

46

3. read aloud and translate:

 

illa Lesbia, quam Catullus ūnam

3.

 

ILLAH LEHSia QUAM CatUHLLus OOnam

that Lesbia, whom alone Catullus ...

47

4. read aloud and translate:

 

plūs quam sē atque suōs amāvit omnēs,

4.

 

PLOOS QUAM SA’HTqueh suOSE amAHWit

loves more than (he loves) himself and all his (people)

48

5. read aloud and translate:

 

nunc in quadriviīs et angiportīs

5.

 

NUHNC IHN QUAHDriwihEESE eht AHNGihPORTEESE

Now in the crossroads and alleys

49

6. read aloud and translate:

 

glūbit magnanimī Remī nepōtēs.

 

(Catullus 58)

6.

 

GLOOBIHT MAHGnaniMEE RehMEE nehPOATAYS

peels the grandsons of great-hearted Remus.

 

 

the precise force of glubo is unclear, but it refers to a sexual act of some kind.

50

1. read aloud and translate:

 

Disertissime Rōmulī nepōtum,

 

The meter is hendecasyllabic

1.

 

DIHSSAIRTISSihmeh ROMEuhLEE nehPOATum

Most eloquent of Romulus’ descendents

51

2. read aloud and translate:

 

quot sunt quotque fuēre, Mārce Tullī,

2.

 

QUOHT SUNT QUOHtqweh fuhAYreh, MAHRkeh TUHLLEE

how(ever) many there are and how(ever) many there have been, Marcus Tullus.

52

3. read aloud and translate:

 

quotque post aliīs erunt in annīs,

3

 

QUOHTQWEH POST alihEESE ehRUHNT in AHNNEESE

and how(ever) many there will be in other years

53

4. read aloud and translate:

 

grātiās tibi maximās Catullus

4.

 

GRAHTEEAHS tihbih MAHXihMAHS CahTOOLLus

Catullus to you the greatest thanks ...

54

5. read aloud and translate:

 

agit, pessimus omnium poēta,

5.

 

AHGIHT PEHSSihmus OHMnihUHM pohAYtah

gives, the worst poet of all,

55

6. read aloud and translate:

 

tantō pessimus omnium poēta

6.

 

TAHNTOE PEHSSihmus OHMnihUHM pohAYtah

just as much the worst poet of all,

56

7. read aloud and translate:

 

quantō tū optimus omnium patrōnus.

 

(Catullus 49)

7.

 

KWAHNTOE TOO OHPtihmuhs OHMnihUHM pahtrOWNus

as much as you are the best patron of all.

57

1. Adulēscēns est cārior mihi quam ego ipse!

1. The young man is dearer to me me than I am myself!

58

2. Atque hic nōn est fīlius meus sed ex frātre meō.

2. And this (young man) is not by son but (the son) from my brother.

59

3. Studia frātris iam diū sunt dissimillima meīs.

3. The pursuits of (my) brother are now for a long time very different from mine.

60

4. Ego vītam urbānam ēgī et ōtium petīvī et,

4. I (myself) have lived a city life and I have sought leisure and

61

5. id quod quīdam fortūnātius putant,

5. —a thing which some (people) think is more fortunate—

62

6. uxōrem numquam habuī.

6. I have never had a wife.

63

7. Ille, autem, haec omnia fēcit:

7. That (one), however, has done all these things:

64

8. nōn in forō sed in agrīs vītam ēgit,

8. he has lived his life not in the forum but in the fields,

65

9. parvum pecūniae accēpit,

9. he has received a small (amount of) money,

66

10. uxōrem pudīcam dūxit,

10. he has married a chaste wife,

67

11. duōs fīliōs habuit.

11. he has had two sons.

68

12. Ex illō ego hunc maiōrem adoptāvī mihi,

12. From him I myself have adopted this older (one) for myself,

69

13. ēduxī ā parvō puerō,

13. I have raised (him) from a small boy,

70

14. amāvī prō meō.

14. I have loved him as though my own.

71

15. In eō adulēscente est dēlectātiō mea;

15. In this young man is my delight;

72

16. sōlum id est cārum mihi.

16. this is the only thing dear to me.

Decks in Wheelock's Latin Translation Class (76):